LIST OF FIGURES

1.1

 

Evolution of the Arctic Observing Network,

 

8

3.1

 

Distribution of Argo floats, drifting buoys, and moored buoys in the world’s northern oceans on September 13, 2005,

 

21

3.2

 

Global distribution of stations in a network that measures ozone concentration in the atmosphere (data years 2002-2005),

 

22

6.1

 

Flow diagram showing how the four essential functions of the AON relate to each other and the broader stakeholders,

 

89

LIST OF BOXES

S.1

 

General Recommendations that Relate to Network Implementation and Operation,

 

4

1.1

 

Evidence of Climate Change in the Arctic,

 

6

1.2

 

History of Arctic Observations,

 

7

1.3

 

International Polar Year (2007-2008),

 

12

1.4

 

Global Earth Observation System of Systems,

 

12

3.1

 

Example of System-wide Gap: Albedo,

 

23

4.1

 

An Imaginary Journey Through the Arctic Observing Network Portal,

 

63

4.2

 

Comparison of Centralized and Distributed Data Holding Approaches,

 

65

4.3

 

Open Geospatial Consortium,

 

66

4.4

 

Metadata Concerns and How the AON Data Management System Could Help Address Them,

 

67

4.5

 

Desirable Traits for a Long-term Archiving System,

 

69

5.1

 

The Human Dimension of the Arctic Observing Network: Perspectives from Human Dimension of the Arctic System,

 

72

5.2

 

General Guidance on Incorporating Local and Traditional Knowledge into Observing Networks,

 

75

5.3

 

European Network for Arctic-Alpine Environmental Research,

 

77

5.4

 

Arctic Coastal Dynamics,

 

80

5.5

 

The Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring Network: Lessons in Data Harmonization,

 

82



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