Appendix A
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

John J. Magnuson (Chair) is Professor Emeritus of Zoology and Limnology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. degree in Zoology with a minor in Oceanography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. Magnuson was formerly Director of the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Limnology and North Temperate Lakes Long-term Ecological Research Program. His research interests include long-term regional ecology, climate change effects on lake ecological systems, fish and fisheries ecology, and community ecology of lakes and islands. Previously a member of the Ocean Studies Board, Dr. Magnuson has a long and distinguished history of contributions to NRC projects including the OSB’s Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries, the Committee on Fisheries, and the U.S. National Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research.


Dorinda G. Dallmeyer is Associate Director of the Dean Rusk Center of International and Comparative Law at the University of Georgia. She holds three degrees from the University of Georgia: B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology and a J.D. Prior to attending law school, Ms. Dallmeyer conducted research for over three years in tropical marine biology and ecology and collaborated on a number of scientific articles. Currently, Ms. Dallmeyer’s primary research areas cross a broad spectrum of international law, with a particular emphasis on the role of negotiation and dispute resolution. She served as a principal investigator for the National



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Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS John J. Magnuson (Chair) is Professor Emeritus of Zoology and Limnology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Minnesota and his Ph.D. degree in Zoology with a minor in Oceanography from the University of British Columbia. Dr. Magnuson was formerly Director of the University of Wisconsin’s Center for Limnology and North Temperate Lakes Long-term Ecological Research Program. His research interests include long-term regional ecology, climate change effects on lake ecological systems, fish and fisheries ecology, and community ecology of lakes and islands. Previously a member of the Ocean Studies Board, Dr. Magnuson has a long and distinguished history of contributions to NRC projects including the OSB’s Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries, the Committee on Fisheries, and the U.S. National Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research. Dorinda G. Dallmeyer is Associate Director of the Dean Rusk Center of International and Comparative Law at the University of Georgia. She holds three degrees from the University of Georgia: B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology and a J.D. Prior to attending law school, Ms. Dallmeyer conducted research for over three years in tropical marine biology and ecology and collaborated on a number of scientific articles. Currently, Ms. Dallmeyer’s primary research areas cross a broad spectrum of international law, with a particular emphasis on the role of negotiation and dispute resolution. She served as a principal investigator for the National

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Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options Science Foundation grant supporting the development of environmental ethics for global marine ecosystems. As a member of the University of Georgia Environmental Ethics Certificate Program, Ms. Dallmeyer instructs courses in environmental dispute resolution and marine environmental ethics. Richard B. Deriso is currently an Associate Adjunct Professor of Biological Oceanography at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Chief Scientist of the Tuna-Billfish Program at the Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission (IATTC). He received his Ph.D. in Biomathematics from the University of Washington. Dr. Deriso’s research interests include population dynamics, quantitative ecology, and fishery stock assessment. A former member of the Ocean Studies Board, he has also served as Co-chair for the NRC Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods and as a member of two other NRC committees: a Review of Atlantic Bluefin Tuna, and Cooperative Research in the National Marine Fisheries Service. James H. Cowan, Jr., is a professor in both the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences and the Coastal Fisheries Institute at Louisiana State University. He received an M.S. in Biological Oceanography from Old Dominion University, and both an M.S. in Experimental Statistics and a Ph.D. in Marine Sciences from Louisiana State University. His current research interests include fisheries ecology, biological and fisheries oceanography, biometrics, food-web dynamics, and population demographics and genetics. Dr. Cowan has served as a U.S. delegate both to the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Pacific Marine Sciences Organization. He was Chairman of the Reef Fish Stock Assessment Panel from 1992 to 2004 and is currently a member of the Scientific and Statistical Committee for the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. Dr. Cowan also previously served on the NRC Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas. Larry B. Crowder is Professor of Marine Ecology at the Nicholas School for the Environment at Duke University. He completed his doctoral studies in Zoology at Michigan State University. Dr. Crowder’s research centers on predation and food-web interactions, mechanisms underlying recruitment variation in fishes, and population modeling in conservation biology. He has studied food-web processes in estuaries and lakes and has used observational, experimental, and modeling approaches to understand these interactions in an effort to improve fisheries management. Recently Dr. Crowder has begun developing more extensive programs in marine conservation, including research on bycatch, nutrients and low oxygen, marine invasive species, and integrated ecosystem management. Dr. Crowder is a former member of the Ocean Studies Board and has served on the NRC’s U.S. National Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research and the Committee on the Alaska Groundfish Fishery and Steller Sea Lions.

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Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options Robert T. Paine recently retired (1998) from his position as Professor and former Chairman of the Zoology Department at the University of Washington, where he had worked since 1962. Dr. Paine earned his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1961. His research interests include experimental ecology of organisms on rocky shores, interrelationships between species in an ecosystem, and the organization and structure of marine communities. He has examined the roles of predation and disturbance in promoting coexistence and biodiversity. Dr. Paine is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the Ocean Studies Board and was previously a member of the Board on Life Sciences. He has had extensive experience with the National Research Council; his most recent committee service includes the Committee on Protection of Ecology and Resources of the Caspian Sea and chairing the Committee on the Alaska Groundfish Fishery and Steller Sea Lions. Ana M. Parma is a research scientist with CONICET—the Argentine Council for Science & Technology, working at the Centro Nacional Patagónico in the south of Argentina. She earned her Ph.D. in Fisheries Science in 1989 from the University of Washington and worked as an assessment scientist at the International Pacific Halibut Commission until 2000. Dr. Parma’s research interests include fish stock assessment, population dynamics, and adaptive management of fisheries resources. The main focus of her work is on small-scale coastal reef and shellfish fisheries, where she is involved in the evaluation and implementation of spatially explicit management approaches in several fisheries in South America. Among her many prestigious honors, Dr. Parma was awarded a Pew Fellowship in Marine Conservation in 2003 and was appointed Mote Eminent Scholar in 2003. Her previous experience with the Ocean Studies Board includes service on three committees: the Committee on Evaluation, Design, and Monitoring of Marine Reserves and Protected Areas in the United States; the Committee on Fish Stock Assessment Methods; and the Committee to Review Northeast Fishery Stock Assessments. Andrew A. Rosenberg is a Professor of Natural Resources and Earth, Oceans, and Space at the University of New Hampshire. He received his Ph.D. from Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dr. Rosenberg explores marine sciences, marine policy, and fisheries in his research projects. Even before joining the University of New Hampshire, he engaged in a distinguished career involving marine sciences. As former Deputy Director of the National Marine Fisheries Service, Dr. Rosenberg was a key policy maker for that agency and served as a liaison to Congress, senior levels of the administration, resource management partners, and the public. Prior to the deputy director post, he served the National Marine Fisheries Service for ten years, where he was the Northeast Regional Administrator and Chief of Research Coordination in Maryland and Massachusetts. Most recently, Dr. Rosenberg served as a member of the President-appointed U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy.

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Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options James E. Wilen is Director of the Center for Natural Resource Policy Analysis and Professor of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Wilen received his B.A. degree from California State University and his Ph.D. from the University of California, Riverside. His research focuses broadly on natural resource economics. His specific interests include bioeconomic modeling of fisheries systems, dynamics of exploitation patterns, factor distortion under regulated open access, natural resource damage analysis, and spatial models of fisheries systems. His most recent research focuses on the economics of marine reserves, spatial fisheries management, and comparative analysis of fisheries policies. Dr. Wilen previously served on the Ocean Studies Board Committee on Evaluation, Design, and Monitoring of Marine Reserves and Protected Areas in the United States. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF Christine Blackburn worked as a program officer with the Ocean Studies Board until early 2006. She earned her Ph.D. in oceanography from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Since receiving her doctorate, Dr. Blackburn has been working in science policy, first as a Sea Grant Policy Fellow at the California Resources Agency. She then received an AAAS Science Policy Fellowship which brought her to Washington, DC to work at the National Institutes of Health. In 2003, Dr. Blackburn became a policy associate for the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy where she helped with the monumental task of preparing the Commission’s 500+ page report (and 6 separate volumes of appendixes). She is currently the Ocean Program Project Manager at the California Coastal Conservancy. Susan Park is an associate program officer with the Ocean Studies Board. She earned a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Delaware in 2004. Her dissertation focused on the range expansion of the nonnative Asian shore crab Hemigrapsus sanguineus. In the summer of 2002, she participated in the Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Graduate Policy Fellowship with the Ocean Studies Board. During her fellowship, she worked on the OSB study on Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Prior to joining the Ocean Studies Board in 2006, Dr. Park spent time working on aquatic invasive species management with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management and the Northeast Aquatic Nuisance Species Panel. Nancy Caputo is a research associate at the Ocean Studies Board, where she has worked since 2001. Ms. Caputo received an M.P.P. (Master of Public Policy) from the University of Southern California, and a B.A. in political science/international relations from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her interests include marine policy, science, and education. During her tenure with OSB, Ms. Caputo has assisted with the completion of six reports: A Review of the

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Dynamic Changes in Marine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options Florida Keys Carrying Capacity Study (2002), Emulsified Fuels—Risks and Response (2002), Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters—Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003), Enabling Ocean Research in the 21st Century: Implementation of a Network of Ocean Observatories (2003), River Basins and Coastal Systems Planning Within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2004), and Charting the Future of Methane Hydrate Research in United States (2004). She is also the assistant editor of Oceanography, the professional magazine of The Oceanography Society. Phillip Long earned a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in History from the University of Portland. During college, Mr. Long was a student teacher in calculus, physics, and chemistry, and spent one summer working as a research assistant in an inorganic chemistry lab at Texas A&M University. Since graduating in May 2003, he worked as a medical research assistant at the Oregon Health Sciences University and then wandered north to Alaska where he worked in the Moose’s Tooth Pub in Anchorage. Adventure, ironically, brought Mr. Long east where he worked as a Program Assistant for the Ocean Studies Board starting in December 2004. Mr. Long commenced another position within the National Academies in February 2006 as a Senior Program Assistant with the Board on Physics and Astronomy.

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