References

Brent, D. (2005). Adolescent depression: Developing treatments and treating development. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2003). National longitudinal study of adolescent health. Available: http://www.cpc.unc.edu/addhealth [accessed 2006].

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2004). Surveillance summaries of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2003. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 53(SS-2), 1-29.


DiClemente, R. (2005). Exposure to media and its affect on adolescent decision making: Does life imitate art? Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC.


Flay, B. (2005). Integrating theories of adolescent behavior: The theory of triadic influence. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html.

Flay, B.R., and Petraitis, J. (1994). The theory of triadic influence: A new theory of health behavior with implications for preventive interventions. In G.S. Albrecht (Ed.), Advances in medical sociology, Vol. IV: A reconsideration of models of health behavior change (pp. 19-44). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.


Hall, G.S. (1904). Adolescence: Its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology, sociology, sex, crime, religion, and education. New York: D. Appleton.

Harris, J.R. (1998). The nurture assumption: Why children turn out the way they do. New York: Free Press.



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A Study of Interactions: Emerging Issues in the Science of Adolescence - Workshop Summary References Brent, D. (2005). Adolescent depression: Developing treatments and treating development. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2003). National longitudinal study of adolescent health. Available: http://www.cpc.unc.edu/addhealth [accessed 2006]. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2004). Surveillance summaries of the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance—United States, 2003. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 53(SS-2), 1-29. DiClemente, R. (2005). Exposure to media and its affect on adolescent decision making: Does life imitate art? Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Flay, B. (2005). Integrating theories of adolescent behavior: The theory of triadic influence. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html. Flay, B.R., and Petraitis, J. (1994). The theory of triadic influence: A new theory of health behavior with implications for preventive interventions. In G.S. Albrecht (Ed.), Advances in medical sociology, Vol. IV: A reconsideration of models of health behavior change (pp. 19-44). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press. Hall, G.S. (1904). Adolescence: Its psychology and its relations to physiology, anthropology, sociology, sex, crime, religion, and education. New York: D. Appleton. Harris, J.R. (1998). The nurture assumption: Why children turn out the way they do. New York: Free Press.

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A Study of Interactions: Emerging Issues in the Science of Adolescence - Workshop Summary Institute of Medicine. (2005). Preventing childhood obesity: Health in the balance. Committee on Prevention of Obesity in Children and Youth. J.P. Koplan, C.T. Liverman, and V.I. Kraak (Eds.). Food and Nutrition Board and Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Institute of Medicine. (2006). Food marketing to children and youth: Threat or opportunity? Committee on Food Marketing to Children and Youth. J.M. McGinnis, J.A. Gootman, and V.I. Kraak (Eds.). Food and Nutrition Board. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. Kahn, J. (2005). Adolescent decision making and health behaviors: The influence of contextual factors on the use of new technologies to prevent HPV-related diseases. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html. Kaiser Family Foundation. (2005). Sex on TV: A Kaiser Family Foundation report (executive summary). Washington, DC: Author. Lerner, R., and Steinberg, L. (2004). The scientific study of adolescent development past, present, and future. In R. Lerner and L. Steinberg (Eds.), Handbook of adolescent development. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. Millstein, S.G., Ozer, E.J., Ozer, E.M., Brindis, C.D., Knopf, D.K., and Irwin, C.E., Jr. (1999). Research priorities in adolescent health: An analysis and synthesis of research recommendations. San Francisco: National Adolescent Health Information Center, University of California. Millstein, S.G., and Halpern-Felsher, B.L. (2002). Judgments about risk and perceived invulnerability in adolescents and young adults. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 12(4), 399-422. National Research Council. (2002). Youth pornography and the Internet. Committee to Study Tools and Strategies for Protecting Kids from Pornography and Their Applicability to Other Inappropriate Internet Content. R. Thornburgh and H.S. Lin (Eds.). Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2000). From neurons to neighborhoods: The science of early childhood development. Committee on Integrating the Science of Early Childhood Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families. J. Shonkoff and D. Phillips (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2002). Community programs to promote youth development. Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. J. Eccles and J.A. Gootman (Eds.). Washington, DC: National Academy Press. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2004). Reducing underage drinking: A collective responsibility. Committee on Developing a Strategy to Reduce and Prevent Underage Drinking, Board on Children, Youth, and Families. R.J. Bonnie and M.E. O’Connell (Eds.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. National Research Council and Institute of Medicine. (2005). Growing up global: The changing transitions to adulthood in developing countries. Committee on Population and Board on Children, Youth, and Families. C. Lloyd (Ed.). Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

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A Study of Interactions: Emerging Issues in the Science of Adolescence - Workshop Summary Shirtcliff, E.A. (2005). Neuroendocrine contributions to pubertal development. Presented to the Workshop on the Synthesis of Research on Adolescent Health and Development, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, September 8-9, Washington, DC. Available: http://www.bocyf.org/090805.html. U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. (1991). Adolescent health: Volumes 1, 2, and 3. (OTA-H-468). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Available: http://www.wws.princeton.edu/ota/disk1/1991/9102_n.html, http://www.wws.princeton.edu/ota/disk1/1991/9103_n.html, and http://www.wws.princeton.edu/ota/disk1/1991/9104_n.html.

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