Appendix
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Edward E. Leamer (Chair) is director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, which provides quarterly economic projections for the nation and the state of California. Dr. Leamer holds the Chauncey J. Medberry chair in management at UCLA Anderson, along with joint academic appointments in the departments of statistics and economics at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and a frequent visiting scholar at the International Monetary Fund and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He served on California Governor Pete Wilson’s Council of Economic Advisors from 1995 to 1998 and, more recently, he advised California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.


Gary Gereffi is professor of sociology and director of the Center on Globalization, Governance, and Competitiveness at Duke University, where he teaches courses in economic sociology, globalization and comparative development, and international competitiveness. Dr. Gereffi has published several books and numerous articles on business-government relations in various parts of the world. Dr. Gereffi’s research interests deal with social and environmental certification in global industries, the competitive strategies of global firms, and industrial upgrading in East Asia and Latin America. His three major ongoing research projects are: (1) industrial up-



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Analyzing the U.S. Content of Imports and the Foreign Content of Exports Appendix Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Edward E. Leamer (Chair) is director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, which provides quarterly economic projections for the nation and the state of California. Dr. Leamer holds the Chauncey J. Medberry chair in management at UCLA Anderson, along with joint academic appointments in the departments of statistics and economics at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Econometric Society, and a frequent visiting scholar at the International Monetary Fund and the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. He served on California Governor Pete Wilson’s Council of Economic Advisors from 1995 to 1998 and, more recently, he advised California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Gary Gereffi is professor of sociology and director of the Center on Globalization, Governance, and Competitiveness at Duke University, where he teaches courses in economic sociology, globalization and comparative development, and international competitiveness. Dr. Gereffi has published several books and numerous articles on business-government relations in various parts of the world. Dr. Gereffi’s research interests deal with social and environmental certification in global industries, the competitive strategies of global firms, and industrial upgrading in East Asia and Latin America. His three major ongoing research projects are: (1) industrial up-

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Analyzing the U.S. Content of Imports and the Foreign Content of Exports grading in East Asia, North America, and Eastern Europe/Central Asia; (2) a comparative analysis of global restructuring in the apparel, automotive, computer, and retail sectors; and (3) a study of the emergence of public and private governance systems in the Americas. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University. Gene Grossman is the Jacob Viner professor of international economics at Princeton University, the chair of Princeton’s Department of Economics, and the director of the International Economics Section. He also holds a joint appointment in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Dr. Grossman has received numerous professional honors and awards, including the Harry G. Johnson from the Canadian Economics Association and fellowships from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. He has written extensively on international trade, focusing on the determinants of international competitiveness in dynamic, research-intensive industries, the likely environmental effects of the North American Free Trade Agreement, as well as many other aspects of U.S. and developing countries’ trade policies. His most recent work examines the political forces that shape modern trade policy. He received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lawrence F. Katz is Elisabeth Allison Professor of economics at Harvard University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on broad issues of labor economics and the economics of social problems, including wage and income inequality; unemployment; theories of wage determination; the economics of education; the impact of globalization and technological change on the labor market; and the evaluation of the effectiveness of social and labor market policies. His recent research explores the patterns and determinants of recent changes in the U.S. wage structure and rising labor market inequality in a historical and international comparative context. He is currently examining the history of economic inequality in the United States and the roles of technological changes and how the pace of advancement in education affects the wage structure. He is editor of the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Previously, he served as the chief economist of the U.S. Department of Labor and was the first director of the Program on Children at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Analyzing the U.S. Content of Imports and the Foreign Content of Exports Catherine L. Mann is a senior fellow at the Institute for International Economics. Previously, she served as assistant director of the International Finance Division at the Federal Reserve Board of Governors; senior international economist on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers; and adviser to the chief economist at the World Bank. Her current work focuses on the economic and policy issues of global information, communications, and technology, particularly with reference to the U.S. economy, labor market, and international trade. She also studies broader issues of U.S. trade, the sustainability of the current account, and the exchange value of the dollar. In addition to her work at the Institute, Dr. Mann taught for 10 years as adjunct professor of management at the Owen School of Management at Vanderbilt University and two years at the Johns Hopkins Nitze School for Advanced International Studies, among other university courses. She received her Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Robert H. McGuckin, III, is the director of economic research at The Conference Board in New York. He was the chief of the Center for Economic Studies at the U.S. Bureau of the Census of the Department of Commerce, where he guided development of longitudinal research and a broad research program in both statistics and economics and microdata approaches to economic theory and policy. Previously, he was with the Antitrust Division at the U.S. Department of Justice as a senior economist, assistant director of the Economic Policy Office, and director of research for the Economic Analysis Group. Dr. McGuckin is an expert in industrial organization, productivity, economic indicators and statistics, and the author of numerous articles on economic and statistical issues. His recent work has focused on diffusion of information and communication technology, mergers and acquisitions, China’s economic reforms and their effects on business performance, and business cycle indicators. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Robert E. Scott is the director of international programs at the Economic Policy Institute. His areas of expertise include trade, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), global finance, international economic comparisons, and trade effects on the U.S. textile, apparel, and steel industries. Previously, he was an assistant professor with the College of Business and Management of the University of Maryland at College Park. In addition to his scholarly publications, Dr. Scott has written editorial pieces for

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Analyzing the U.S. Content of Imports and the Foreign Content of Exports The Los Angeles Times, Newsday, USA Today, The Baltimore Sun, and other newspapers. He has represented U.S. industries as an expert witness on the economic effects of imports in several cases concerning unfair trade complaints before the U.S. International Trade Commission. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Matthew J. Slaughter is associate professor of business administration at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. His area of expertise is the economics and politics of globalization. Much of his recent work has focused on the global operations of multinational firms, in particular how knowledge is created and shared within these firms and how their cross-border production arrangements are structured. He has also studied the labor-market effects of international trade, investment, and immigration as well as the political-economy question of individual preferences over globalization policies. In addition to his scholarly publications, his work has been featured in Business Week, The Economist, Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post,The Washington Times, and on the Marketplace Morning Report on National Public Radio. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Slaughter resigned from the committee on being nominated for the President’s Council of Economic Advisors in the fall of 2005. Michael Storper is professor of regional and international development in the Department of Urban Planning at the University of California at Los Angeles and centennial professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics. His major research interests and areas of supervision are globalization and local and regional economic development processes; the effects of liberalized trade and technology flows on global location patterns; the role of local economic policies in influencing the effects of globalization in local and regional economies; the overall geography of the global economy: changes and continuities in location and specialization patterns; face-to-face contact as a source of urbanization economies; the effects of new communications technologies on face-to-face contact and delocalization; and comparative regional development processes. He has published widely on these and related topics. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.