Acknowledgments

As in the case of all my books, I am indebted to many people for help and encouragement. First, to my business partner, sailing associate, and lifelong friend, Russell Spencer, my thanks for suggesting the topic and encouraging me along the way. Russell, Erik Oistad, Captain Al Gravallese (U.S. Navy, retired), and Jay Winter served as an informal advisory committee and were instrumental in assisting me with many important contacts in the navy, merchant marine, and oceanography fields.

To the many outstanding captains, sailors, and crew who kindly took time to share their expertise and knowledge with me, I offer my most profound thanks: Captain Karl Adams; Captain Jerry Aspland, president, California Maritime Academy (retired); Captain Ernie Barker; Admiral Joe Barth, U.S. Navy (retired); Matthew G. Brown, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Bent Christiansen, chief port pilot, Port of Los Angeles; Admiral Bill Cross, U.S. Navy (retired); Captain Scott Culver, Foss Maritime; Bob Degnan, ChevronTexaco; Grant Donesley, voyage manager, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Jerry Fee, U.S. Navy (retired); Captain Skip Gallimore, Skipper Keith Garrison, Captain Jon Harrison, American Ship Management, Lieutenant Ray Holdsworth, U.S. Navy



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Extreme Waves Acknowledgments As in the case of all my books, I am indebted to many people for help and encouragement. First, to my business partner, sailing associate, and lifelong friend, Russell Spencer, my thanks for suggesting the topic and encouraging me along the way. Russell, Erik Oistad, Captain Al Gravallese (U.S. Navy, retired), and Jay Winter served as an informal advisory committee and were instrumental in assisting me with many important contacts in the navy, merchant marine, and oceanography fields. To the many outstanding captains, sailors, and crew who kindly took time to share their expertise and knowledge with me, I offer my most profound thanks: Captain Karl Adams; Captain Jerry Aspland, president, California Maritime Academy (retired); Captain Ernie Barker; Admiral Joe Barth, U.S. Navy (retired); Matthew G. Brown, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Bent Christiansen, chief port pilot, Port of Los Angeles; Admiral Bill Cross, U.S. Navy (retired); Captain Scott Culver, Foss Maritime; Bob Degnan, ChevronTexaco; Grant Donesley, voyage manager, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Jerry Fee, U.S. Navy (retired); Captain Skip Gallimore, Skipper Keith Garrison, Captain Jon Harrison, American Ship Management, Lieutenant Ray Holdsworth, U.S. Navy

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Extreme Waves (retired); Captain Jan Jannsen, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Giuseppe Mazzoleni, Chevron Transport Corporation Ltd.; Captain J. Michael Miller, ChevronTexaco Shipping Company LLC; Captain Mark D. Remijan, American Ship Management; Bill Watkins, vice commodore, California Yacht Club; and Tod and Linda White, S/V Seascape. Eric Akiskalian and Dan Moore told me about the latest developments in tow-in surfing and close encounters with giant waves, while Kent A. Smith provided background material on surfing in general. My colleagues at Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall and affiliated companies made port visits possible and provided background information; I particularly thank Clyde Garrison, Greg Hess, and Mike Gasparro, as well as Ms. Behjat Zanjani, president, IEM Corp. Other technical specialists were generous with their help, including Professor George Pararas-Carayannis, former director of the International Tsunami Information Center (under the auspices of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization–Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission) and chief scientist for various missions sponsored by the United Nations Development Program, Dr. Henry Chen, president, Ocean Systems, Inc.; Alf Cook, Merchant Marine (retired); Hany Elwany, Coastal Environments, Inc.; Gordon Fulton, president, Concept Marine Associates, Inc.; Antonio Gioiello, chief harbor engineer, Port of Los Angeles; Professor Peter Joubert, University of Melbourne; Marion Lyman-Mersereau, Punahou School, Honolulu; John McLaurin, Pacific Merchant Shipping Association; Thomas Russell, general counsel, Port of Los Angeles; Rick Shema, weatherguy.com; Dr. Ray Schmitt, Ocean Studies Board, National Academy of Sciences; and Grant Stewart, American Ship Management. Tom Cain, my master’s swimming program colleague and skilled sailor, provided many useful leads on rogue waves. He and Mitzi Wells read early drafts of the manuscript and gave much helpful advice regarding portions that would either overwhelm or bore the general reader. I am grateful to Ronald Holle, meteorologist, for reviewing weather-related material; Professor Chris Garrett, School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, for reviewing materials concerning rogue wave theories and tides; and John Odea and his col-

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Extreme Waves leagues at the U.S. Navy Carderock Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, for reviewing materials concerning ship design. I thank Michael S. McDaniel of the law firm Countryman and McDaniel for permission to quote from their database of ship casualties at www.cargolaw.com/presentations_casualties.html. Meaghan and Brad Van Liew kindly shared with me the behind-the-scenes effort to mount his “Around the World Alone” race and Brad’s experiences during this challenging ordeal. I’m grateful to Peter Lewis, Brisbane, Australia, for providing background on the Sydney-Hobart races and for recounting his experiences in several races, including the 1998 race. Pete was always ready to take my e-mails and calls, in spite of the difference in time zones. Jen Hanson shared with me her recollections of the long night when the MV Explorer battled a North Pacific storm and the aftermath of being struck by a rogue wave that disabled the ship. I gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of the staff at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center, Ewa, Hawaii. I want to thank the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Center Director Dr. Charles McCreery for granting me access. I thank Marilyn Ramos for making arrangements, and a very special thanks to Barry Hirshorn and Stuart Weinstein for patiently answering my questions and for providing me with detailed insight into the operation of the center. Faye Wachs and Eugene Kim told me their incredible story of survival under the December 26, 2004, Southeast Asia tsunami. The staff at the Balboa Branch of the Newport Beach Public Library (Phyllis Scheffler, librarian, assisted by Barbara Zinzer and Michael Payne), with its special collection of maritime literature, were wonderful to work with, as was the Nautical Museum at Newport Beach. I thank Kurt Mueller for providing the illustrations, Anne Elizabeth Powell for her usual insightful manuscript review, and Dr. Susanne Lehner for patiently responding to my questions and for writing the Foreword. As always, my wife Nancy, frequently first mate on my sailing ventures, freely gave her support, encouragement, proofreading, and research assistance. Finally, to my agent, Ron Goldfarb, and to Jeff Robbins, Dick Morris, and the wonderful team at Joseph Henry Press, my gratitude.

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