APPENDIX B
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SPEAKERS AND SUMMARY AUTHORS

Vicki L. Colvin is professor of chemistry and chemical engineering at Rice University, where she has taught since 1996. In addition, she is director of the university’s Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, a nanoscience and engineering center funded by the National Science Foundation. Previously, she completed postdoctoral work at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Colvin is the recipient of numerous awards for both teaching and research, including Phi Beta Kappa’s Teaching Prize (1998-1999); the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award (2002); an Alfred P. Sloan fellowship; and the Victor K. LaMer Award from the American Chemical Society for her work in colloid and surface chemistry. In 2002, she was named one of Discover magazine’s Top 20 Scientists to Watch. Dr. Colvin is a frequent contributor to many peer-reviewed journals, including Advanced Materials and Physical Review Letters, and holds four U.S. patents.


Crystal M. Cunanan is vice president for development and operations at ReVision Optics, where her responsibilities include the development of novel biomaterials for intracorneal refractive procedures. She also provides technical input into the company’s strategy, its intellectual portfolio, and its clinical and regulatory activities. Concurrently, she serves as scientific advisor to a start-up company, Arbor Surgical Technologies, where she was previously the director of operations with responsibility for establishing the manufacturing process for the company’s bioprosthetic heart valve. Prior to her work at Arbor Surgical Technologies, she spent 6 years at Edwards Lifesciences and 11 years at Allergan. At Edwards, she served as chief technical expert in tissue products, processes, and materials and was responsible for developing new analytical test methods and animal implant models as well as writing U.S. and European regulatory submissions and patent applications. At Allergan, she served as project leader on numerous refractive projects in the surgical division, developed and qualified new material platforms, conducted testing required to commercialize products, and designed and executed animal toxicology studies to demonstrate product safety. Ms. Cunanan is the author of 14 U.S. patents and 13 published patent applications. She is the author or coauthor of over 20 published abstracts, articles, and book chapters. She has been active in numerous professional societies, including the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the Surfaces in Biomaterials Foundation, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs and has chaired the Industry Advisory



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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies APPENDIX B BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF SPEAKERS AND SUMMARY AUTHORS Vicki L. Colvin is professor of chemistry and chemical engineering at Rice University, where she has taught since 1996. In addition, she is director of the university’s Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, a nanoscience and engineering center funded by the National Science Foundation. Previously, she completed postdoctoral work at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Colvin is the recipient of numerous awards for both teaching and research, including Phi Beta Kappa’s Teaching Prize (1998-1999); the Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award (2002); an Alfred P. Sloan fellowship; and the Victor K. LaMer Award from the American Chemical Society for her work in colloid and surface chemistry. In 2002, she was named one of Discover magazine’s Top 20 Scientists to Watch. Dr. Colvin is a frequent contributor to many peer-reviewed journals, including Advanced Materials and Physical Review Letters, and holds four U.S. patents. Crystal M. Cunanan is vice president for development and operations at ReVision Optics, where her responsibilities include the development of novel biomaterials for intracorneal refractive procedures. She also provides technical input into the company’s strategy, its intellectual portfolio, and its clinical and regulatory activities. Concurrently, she serves as scientific advisor to a start-up company, Arbor Surgical Technologies, where she was previously the director of operations with responsibility for establishing the manufacturing process for the company’s bioprosthetic heart valve. Prior to her work at Arbor Surgical Technologies, she spent 6 years at Edwards Lifesciences and 11 years at Allergan. At Edwards, she served as chief technical expert in tissue products, processes, and materials and was responsible for developing new analytical test methods and animal implant models as well as writing U.S. and European regulatory submissions and patent applications. At Allergan, she served as project leader on numerous refractive projects in the surgical division, developed and qualified new material platforms, conducted testing required to commercialize products, and designed and executed animal toxicology studies to demonstrate product safety. Ms. Cunanan is the author of 14 U.S. patents and 13 published patent applications. She is the author or coauthor of over 20 published abstracts, articles, and book chapters. She has been active in numerous professional societies, including the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, the Surfaces in Biomaterials Foundation, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Artificial Internal Organs and has chaired the Industry Advisory

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies Board for the Washington Engineered Biomaterials Engineering Research Center. She is a member of the NRC Committee to Review the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Susan B. Foote is associate professor and head of the Health Services Research and Policy Division at the School of Public Health, University of Minnesota. She is the policy director of the Medical Technology Leadership Forum, a nonprofit think tank on medical technology issues, and serves on its board. In addition, she is on the board of directors of two medical technology companies. From 1990 to 1995, Ms. Foote served as a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellow and senior health policy advisor to U.S. Senator David Durenberger (R-Minn.). She has published widely in the field of medical technology and health policy and has served as an advisor to many national organizations, including the neurological devices panel of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the Office of Technology Assessment, the General Medicine Institute of the National Institutes of Health, the Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, and to numerous projects and committees of the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Sciences. James L. Harden is assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, where he has worked since 1997. His research interests include engineered artificial proteins for biomaterials applications, the multiscale modeling of the role of the glycocalyx in microcirculation physiology and mechanical signal transduction, and the structural and rheological properties of soft materials and complex fluids. Currently, his work involves a combination of materials design, experiment, theory, and simulation. Since joining the faculty at Hopkins, he has developed programs in biomaterials, protein engineering, biophysical aspects of microcirculation physiology, and soft glassy materials. Prior to joining Hopkins, he completed postdoctoral work at Nagoya University in Japan, at the Ecole Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles in Paris, and at Cambridge University. He is the author or coauthor of numerous publications and presentations and is associate editor of Soft Materials. He is active in several professional societies, including the Society of Rheology and the American Institute of Chemical Engineers. Annabelle R. Hett is a risk expert in the Risk Engineering Services Division of Swiss Re, a global reinsurance company, where she has worked since 2002. She is in charge of Swiss Re’s risk perception system, SONAR, and is involved in projects related to the identification, assessment, and communication of risk. After obtaining a degree in veterinary medicine with a thesis in

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies radiology and nuclear medicine, Dr. Hett worked as a veterinarian in an equine clinic. She then joined the division for epidemiology at the Swiss Federal Veterinary Office, where she focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy and conducted research projects in collaboration with the Swiss Reference Laboratory for Spongiform Encephalopathies in Animals. She attended further training in risk communication before joining Swiss Re. Larry G. Kessler is director of the Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories (OSEL) at the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH). OSEL plays a crucial role in identifying key scientific questions and solutions concerning device safety and effectiveness. Since taking over as director of OSEL in 2002, when it was still the Office of Science and Technology, Dr. Kessler has overseen the efforts of the CDRH laboratories and the Standards Coordination Program. From 2001 to 2002, he was a visiting scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, working on research projects involving prostate cancer trends, the National Emphysema Treatment Trial, and studies of colorectal and lung cancer. Dr. Kessler originally joined CDRH in 1995, as director of the Office of Surveillance and Biometrics. Under his leadership, the office implemented the medical device reporting regulation for user reporting, developed a program for reducing the burden on industry caused by repetitive reporting, and completed a pilot program to develop a sentinel system for user facility reporting of adverse events. From 1996 to 2001, he served as chair of Study Group 2 of the Global Harmonization Task Force, concentrating on postmarket vigilance and surveillance. Prior to joining CDRH, Dr. Kessler served for 9 years as chief of the Applied Research Branch at the National Cancer Institute. His research has concentrated on applications of quantitative methods and health services research to problems in surveillance and public health. He has published more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles as well as numerous book chapters and government reports. Michael A. Laflamme is acting instructor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Washington (UW) and physician with the UW Medical Center. His current research focuses on the regenerative potential of cardiomyocytes derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in a rodent model of myocardial infarction. Dr. Laflamme completed the Medical Scientist (MD/PhD) Training Program at Emory University School of Medicine in 1999, with graduate work examining the role of b-adrenergic signal transduction and homeostasis in ventricular myocytes. He completed his residency training in anatomic pathology at UW in Seattle, with subsequent training in diagnostic cardiovascular pathology. He completed postdoctoral work in the UW Department of Pathology, investigating the potential of both endogenous and exogenous stem cells in cardiac repair. In December 2005,

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies Dr. Laflamme became a principal investigator in the new UW Center for Cardiovascular and Regenerative Medicine. In addition to continuing to examine the potential of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes in rodent preclinical models of cardiac injury, his laboratory will address the electrophysiological properties of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes as well as strategies to derive specialized pacemaking and cardiac conduction system cells from hESC cultures. Charles R. Martin is Colonel Allen R. and Margaret G. Crow Professor of Chemistry, professor of anesthesiology, and director of the Center for Research at the Bio/Nano Interface at the University of Florida. His research interests are in nanomaterials, the bio/nano interface, and bioanalytical chemistry. His research group pioneered a novel approach for preparing nanomaterials—called the template method—that is now practiced in laboratories throughout the world. He has published over 250 papers on these topics and is one of the most highly cited authors in nanotechnology. Dr. Martin was the winner of the 1999 Carl Wagner Memorial Award of the Electrochemical Society and serves on the editorial advisory boards of Advanced Materials, Electrochimica Acta, and Small Times. Edward K. Moran is director of the tristate innovation practice of the Technology, Media, and Telecommunications Group at the New York office of Deloitte & Touche. In addition, he heads up the nanotech industry practice and is a leader of the tristate venture-capital-backed company practice. He provides clients with consultative assistance in securing financing, strategic planning, product innovation, market segmentation, competitive positioning, and industry analysis. As part of the product innovation process, he also assists clients with the identification of strategic partners and consults on the management of these relationships. Prior to joining Deloitte & Touche, Mr. Moran was managing partner of a Manhattan law firm serving technology and entertainment clients. He also cofounded a multidisciplinary consultancy that targeted high-tech and entertainment companies and was a managing director of a Manhattan investment and advisory company that specializes in technology and media investments. Mr. Moran speaks widely on the topics of product innovation, business strategy, nanotechnology, technology transfer, and the financing of technology companies. He is executive director and serves on the board of directors of the New York State NanoBusiness Alliance, the first industry association founded to advance the emerging business of nanotechnology and microsystems. He is the author or coauthor of several publications on the impact of nanotechnology. James S. Murday is chief scientist at the Office of Naval Research and executive secretary to the U.S. National Science and Technology Council’s

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies Subcommittee on Nanometer Science Engineering and Technology. He joined the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in 1970, led the surface chemistry effort from 1975 to 1987, and has been superintendent of the Chemistry Division since 1988. From May to August 1997 he served as acting director of research for the Department of Defense, Research, and Engineering. Dr. Murday is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Chemical Society, and the Materials Research Society, as well as a fellow of the American Vacuum Society (AVS) and the Institute of Physics in the United Kingdom. For the AVS, he has served as trustee (1981 to 1984), director (1986 to 1988), representative to the American Institute of Physics’ governing board (1986 to 1992), president (1991 to 1993), and representative to the Federation of Materials Societies (1998 to present). His research interest in nanoscience began in 1983 as an Office of Naval Research program officer and continues through the NRL Nanoscience Institute. He has organized numerous conferences and conference proceedings on scanning tunneling microscopy and nanoscience. Under his direction, both the AVS and the International Union for Vacuum Science, Technology, and Applications created a nanometer science/technology division. Stephen N. Oesterle is senior vice president for medicine and technology at Medtronic, Inc., where he provides executive leadership for scientific research, formation of technological strategies, and continued development of strong cooperative relationships with the world’s medical communities. Prior to joining Medtronic in 2002, he served as associate professor of medicine at the Harvard University Medical School and director of invasive cardiology services at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. Dr. Oesterle has been an advisor and consultant to medical device companies, financial institutions, and Internet service providers. He has international experience in clinical research and has trained many physicians in interventional cardiology, traveling widely to teach and demonstrate modern techniques in Europe and Asia. He has made more than 200 invited presentations to regional, national, or international medical symposia and workshops. Dr. Oesterle received his medical doctorate from Yale University, completed his internship and residency years at Massachusetts General Hospital, and completed a fellowship in interventional cardiology at Stanford University. Virgil Percec is P. Roy Vagelos Chair and professor of chemistry at the University of Pennsylvania. His research experience has been directed to a wide range of fundamental issues of polymer synthesis and modification, particularly the development of new polymerization reactions and understanding reaction mechanisms. He has applied Williamson and Wittig phase-transfer catalyzed reactions to the preparation of new classes of functional polymers and sequential copolymers, as well as novel alternating block

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies copolymers and liquid crystalline polyethers. His research interests include living metathesis polymerization on acetylenic monomers; a novel method for the synthesis of thermally stable polyethersulfones and polyetherketones; cyclic, hyperbranched, and dendrimeric liquid crystalline polymers; and a living radical polymerization process initiated by arenesulfonyl chlorides and metal catalysts. Most recently, his work has focused on the design of molecular-recognition-directed, self-assembled supramolecular systems and other aspects of supramolecular chemistry. He is editor of the Journal of Polymer Science: Part A: Polymer Chemistry and serves on the editorial boards of 11 journals. Mark F. Pittenger is vice president for research at Osiris Therapeutics, where he has worked since 1994. Dr. Pittenger has 20 years of research experience in cellular and molecular biology and has spent the past decade leading research activities in the isolation and characterization of adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). His research group has studied the differentiation of MSCs to many lineages, including cartilage, bone, fat, marrow stroma, and cardiomyocytes. The results of this research have been published in leading scientific journals and have become benchmarks in stem cell research. Dr. Pittenger served as the principal investigator for several grant awards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. Prior to joining Osiris Therapeutics, Dr. Pittenger was a staff associate with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories. He completed postdoctoral work at Yale University after receiving his Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Nik Rokop is president and chief executive officer of nLake Technology Partners, a management, business development, and technology commercialization group specializing in nanotechnology. In addition, he is president and a founding member of the Chicago Microtechnology and Nanotechnology Community. He has 25 years of entrepreneurial experience in engineering, manufacturing, sales, marketing, and international operations, with experience in the iron and steel industries, manufacturing, and the Internet. Mr. Rokop has lectured widely on the impact of nanotechnology and was named one of i-Street Magazine’s Top 100 in Technology and Economic Development in 2002. He is a founding member of the BIG Idea Forum and was the project executive on the U.S.-Israel NanoBiotechnology seminar series in 2004. Bonnie A. Scarborough is a program officer with the National Materials Advisory Board and the Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design of the National Research Council (NRC), where she has worked since 1995. Her responsibilities include developing and directing policy studies in

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies biomedical engineering, materials science, and manufacturing. She is the project director for the Roundtable on Biomedical Engineering Materials and Applications (BEMA) and was editor of the first BEMA workshop proceedings, Science-Based Assessment: Accelerating Product Development of Combination Medical Devices (2004). She has served as study director for a number of NRC publications, including Decreasing Energy Efficiency in Manufacturing (2005), Use of Lightweight Materials in 21st Century Army Trucks (2003), Defense Manufacturing in 2010 and Beyond (1999), and Separation Technologies for the Industries of the Future (1998), and has contributed to many others. Previously, she worked for the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology at the NRC and for Hampshire Research Associates, an environmental consulting firm specializing in industrial process analysis. Philip H. Schwartz is director of the National Human Neural Stem Cell Resource at Children’s Hospital of Orange County, as well as associate research biologist at the Developmental Biology Center of the University of California at Irvine, and visiting associate professor in the Stem Cells and Regeneration Program of the Burnham Institute. Dr. Schwartz’s early research included studies of models of energy-failure-induced brain damage and preclinical and clinical studies of pharmacologic agents aimed at maintaining cerebral perfusion and/or neuroprotection. For the past 8 years, he has been involved in the harvesting of human brains from patients with neurogenetic diseases, and his current research is directed at understanding the factors influencing the behavior of human central nervous system (CNS) stem cells and multipotent CNS progenitor populations in the normal and neurogenetically diseased brain. He is also interested in novel ways to derive human embryonic stem cell lines and has established neural stem cell lines from transgenic pigs and cats. Dr. Schwartz’s recent manuscripts on human stem cells include techniques for the harvest and characterization of postmortem cerebrocortical neural stem cells, studies of asymmetric cell division in neural stem cells, and techniques for the harvest and characterization of postmortem neural retina stem cells. In addition, he has been involved in studies of stem cells taken from patients with the fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome, Rett syndrome, and mitochondrial disease. As principal investigator for a T15 human embryonic stem cell culture training course funded by the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Schwartz trains scientists from all over the world in current embryonic and neural stem cell techniques. Nadrian C. Seeman holds the Margaret and Herman Sokol Chair and is professor in the Department of Chemistry at New York University, where he has taught for 16 years. His research laboratory is investigating unusual DNA molecules in model systems that use synthetic molecules. A major effort is

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies devoted to DNA nanotechnology. The attachment of specific sticky ends to a DNA branched junction enables the construction of sticky figures, whose edges are double-stranded DNA. This approach has been used to assemble a cube, a truncated octahedron, nanomechanical devices, and two-dimensional crystals from DNA. Potential applications include the assembly of a biochip computer, nanorobotics, and the rational synthesis of periodic matter. Previously, Dr. Seeman worked at the State University of New York at Albany and completed postdoctoral training at Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Science and Technology Award from Popular Science (1993); the Feynman Prize in Nanotechnology (1995); the Emerging Technology Award from Discover (1997); and the Tulip Award in DNA-Based Computing (2004). He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and founding president of the International Society for Nanoscale Science, Computation, and Engineering. Steven L. Stice holds a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar endowed chair and is professor in the Animal and Diary Science Program at the University of Georgia. In addition, he is director of the university’s Regenerative Bioscience Center. He has over 16 years’ experience in biotechnology research and development with a focus on developing innovative stem cell technologies for curing diseases. Dr. Stice produced the first cloned rabbit in 1987 and the first cloned transgenic calves (George and Charlie) in 1998. In 1997 his group produced the first genetically modified embryonic-stem-cell-derived pigs and cattle. This research led to publications in Science and Nature, national news coverage, and the first U.S. patents on cloning animals and cattle embryonic stem cells. In 2001, Dr. Stice announced a breakthrough in the cloning process and the first animal cloned from an animal that had been dead for 48 hours. Dr. Stice is a cofounder of five biotechnology companies, including CytoGenesis, Inc., later purchased by BresaGen. He helped BresaGen develop four of the human embryonic stem cell lines approved for National Institutes of Health funding. Dr. Stice was also a cofounder and chief scientific officer at Advanced Cell Technology, a company developing cloning and stem cell technology. He was named one of the top 40 entrepreneurs under 40 years old in Georgia (2000) and was named one of the 100 Most Influential Georgians in 2002 by Georgia Trend. Throughout his career he has published and lectured on cloning and stem cell technologies. Jennifer L. West is Isabel C. Cameron Professor of Bioengineering and professor in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at Rice University. Her research in biomaterials and tissue engineering focuses on the synthesis and development of novel biofunctional materials and on the

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Proceedings from the Workshop on Biomedical Materials at the Edge: Challenges in the Convergence of Technologies use of biomaterials and engineering approaches to the study of biological problems. Her current research includes work on tissue-engineered vascular grafts, nitric-oxide-releasing polymers, and mechanisms of restenosis. She is the author or coauthor of over 60 publications and has made more than 25 presentations in the field.