TABLE 1-1 Eligible,a Actual, and Additional Donors, 2002 and 2003

Parameter

2002

2003

Eligible deathsa

12,015

12,031

Consents for donation

6,370

6,630

Actual deceased donorsb

5,743

5,908

Donation rate (%)c

48.7

49.8

Additional deceased donorsd

444

547

Total deceased donors

6,187

6,455

aEligible deaths include any individuals with a heartbeat meeting or imminently meeting death by neurologic criteria and aged 70 years or younger who have not been diagnosed with exclusionary medical conditions.

bAt least one organ recovered for transplantation from deceased donors who meet the definition of an eligible death.

cExcludes additional donors (Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients analysis, May 2004).

dAt least one organ recovered for transplantation from deceased donors that do not meet the definition of an eligible death.

SOURCE: HRSA and SRTR (2005).

TABLE 1-2 Deceased Organ Donors, Potential Versus Actual

Criteria Used to Determine Death

Annual Number of Estimated Potential Donors

Actual Number of Donors, 2003a

Circulatory determination of death

 

 

Uncontrolled

22,000b

17c

Controlled

Unknown

236

Neurologic determination of death

12,000d

6,178

aData provided by OPTN-UNOS as of September 8, 2005 (see Chapter 5, Table 5-2) include an additional 17 DCDD donors in 2003 with unknown circumstances of death.

bEstimate of annual out-of-hospital cardiac arrest deaths meeting criteria for uncontrolled DCDD (see Chapter 5).

cOPTN data indicate that most of the uncontrolled DCDDs were Maastricht Category IV deaths.

dBased on 2003 data on eligible donors (Table 1-1; HRSA and SRTR, 2005; see also Guadagnoli et al., 2003; Sheehy et al., 2003 for estimates ranging from 10,500 to 16,800 potential donors with neurologic determination of death).

Transplant Recipients

Transplant recipients probably know best the real value of increasing the numbers of donated organs: an extended lifetime, improved quality of life, and a chance to resume activities that would have been precluded without a transplant. A 10-year overall increase in life expectancy is reported for kidney transplant recipients compared with the life expectancy



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