Appendix B
Biographies of Committee Members and Staff

ALAN SCHRIESHEIM (Chair) consults on research productivity issues for corporate and government clients, strategic planning of research programs, and corporate-academic research partnerships. He also consults on issues related to the energy and utility sector.

Dr. Schriesheim is director emeritus of the Argonne National Laboratory. He was previously the chief executive officer of Argonne National Laboratory, having served as the director of Argonne from 1983 to 1996. He joined Argonne after a long career with Exxon Corporation. Dr. Schriesheim was the first national laboratory director to be recruited from industry, and he successfully launched a series of initiatives to diversify Argonne’s core competencies, broaden its research scope, and expand its relationships with other government, academic, and industrial organizations, both nationally and internationally. During his tenure, Argonne undertook programs spanning the full range of science from high-temperature superconductors to developing biological microchips and sequencing the human genome to establishing a virtual-reality advanced parallel-processing computer center. Dr. Schriesheim was the driving force behind the establishment of ARCH, a separate entity between the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory designed to commercialize technology from both institutions. He is the author or coauthor of numerous publications and holds 22 U.S. patents.

Dr. Schriesheim is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the National Academy of



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities Appendix B Biographies of Committee Members and Staff ALAN SCHRIESHEIM (Chair) consults on research productivity issues for corporate and government clients, strategic planning of research programs, and corporate-academic research partnerships. He also consults on issues related to the energy and utility sector. Dr. Schriesheim is director emeritus of the Argonne National Laboratory. He was previously the chief executive officer of Argonne National Laboratory, having served as the director of Argonne from 1983 to 1996. He joined Argonne after a long career with Exxon Corporation. Dr. Schriesheim was the first national laboratory director to be recruited from industry, and he successfully launched a series of initiatives to diversify Argonne’s core competencies, broaden its research scope, and expand its relationships with other government, academic, and industrial organizations, both nationally and internationally. During his tenure, Argonne undertook programs spanning the full range of science from high-temperature superconductors to developing biological microchips and sequencing the human genome to establishing a virtual-reality advanced parallel-processing computer center. Dr. Schriesheim was the driving force behind the establishment of ARCH, a separate entity between the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory designed to commercialize technology from both institutions. He is the author or coauthor of numerous publications and holds 22 U.S. patents. Dr. Schriesheim is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a member of the National Academy of

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities Engineering, and a past chairman of the National Conference on the Advancement of Research. He has been active in community, educational, and cultural affairs, placing emphasis on developing the scientists of tomorrow. Dr. Schriesheim holds a bachelor’s degree from Brooklyn Polytechnic University and a Ph.D. in chemistry from Pennsylvania State University. MEYER (MIKE) BENZAKEIN received his mechanical engineering degree in 1960. He received an M.S.M.E. in 1963 and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics in 1967. He joined General Electric in 1967, where he served in a number of positions in advanced technology, project and product engineering. He led the CFM56 Engineering Program from 1984 to 1993 and the GE90 Engineering Program from 1993 to February 1995. In February 1995, Dr. Benzakein became general manager for engine systems design and integration, and in this capacity he had the responsibility for engineering leadership and technical oversight of GE Evendale Commercial and Military Aircraft Engines. In January 1996, Dr. Benzakein took over the position of general manager, advanced engineering programs, and held that position until he retired in October 2004. As leader of technology development efforts, he was responsible for GEAE front-end initiatives in driving technology maturation, strengthening the linkage between preliminary design, engine systems, and production hardware design. In 2004 he joined the faculty of the Ohio State University, where he is Wright Brothers Institute professor, chair of the Aerospace Engineering Department, and codirector of the Ohio Center for Advanced Propulsion and Power. Dr. Benzakein has served on several National Academies’ committees, including the Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee, the Committee on Review of NASA’s Next Generation Launch Technology Program, and the Transportation Research Board’s Committee for Developing an Aviation Environmental Design Tool. Dr. Benzakein was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2001. In that year he also received the Gold Medal Award from the Royal Aeronautical Society. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society in 2002. WILLIAM E. COYNE began a more than 30-year career with 3M Corporation in 1968 as a research chemist. From 1996 to his retirement in 2000, he was the senior vice president of research and development at 3M. He had responsibility for 30 technology platforms of the company. During

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities his tenure as senior architect of 3M’s R&D, the company invested more than $1 billion a year in research and significantly raised its new product targets. Each year, 3M now expects to derive 40 percent of its sales revenues from products that are new within the past four years. In 1999, 3M set a record of greater than $1 billion in first-year new product sales. In 1995, 3M was presented with the U.S. Medal of Technology by President Clinton. Dr. Coyne served as sponsor of the 3M Technical Forum, an organization of thousands of 3M researchers who meet periodically in close to 30 chapters to share research, technologies, and ideas. One of 3M’s greatest strengths has been its ability to combine and recombine technologies to create new families of products. In 2001-2002, Dr. Coyne served as a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Future Environments for the National Institute of Standards and Technology. He holds a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Virginia, an M.S. in pharmaceutical chemistry from the University of Toronto, and a B.S. in pharmacy from the University of Toronto. JEROME (JERRY) J. GASPAR was until his recent retirement senior vice president, engineering and technology, and a corporate officer of Rockwell Collins. He was responsible for its engineering and technology organization, including the Advanced Technology Center, the Displays Center, and the Engineering Services Center. He was appointed to the position in June 2001. Previously, Mr. Gaspar served as vice president of engineering and technology, a position he was appointed to in 1999. Prior to that he was appointed to develop the Enterprise Center of Excellence for flat panel display technology products. He joined the company in 1967 and has held positions of increasing responsibility in engineering, operations, and marketing, including vice president of programs for air transport systems. Mr. Gaspar has served as a member of the Industrial Advisory Board of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and is a member of the Industrial Advisory Board of Iowa State University. He is also a member of the Product Development and Management Association and the Project Management Institute. He earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from South Dakota State University and an M.B.A. from the University of Iowa. STANLEY KANDEBO has spent nearly 20 years as a reporter covering aerospace and defense issues. He was educated as an engineer at the United

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities States Military Academy at West Point, the New Jersey Institute of Technology, and the University of Pennsylvania. Early in his career he worked in the aerospace industry as a design engineer on several weapons projects, including the Harpoon and Tomahawk cruise missile programs. At the time of his committee service he was group director for editorial content development and assistant managing editor at Aviation Week & Space Technology. He also created and edits the magazine’s annual Aerospace Source Book. Mr. Kandebo holds an M.S. in chemical and biochemical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and a B.S. in chemical engineering from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. GLENN MAZUR has been disseminating and instructing quality function deployment (QFD) and related product development and innovation methods since their first introduction into the United States in the mid-1980s. His work has been recognized by the founders of these methods; he received the Akao Prize® in 1998 and was selected as one of only two non-Japanese QFD Red Belts® (highest level) in 2000. His current positions include president of Japan Business Consultants, Ltd.; executive director of the QFD Institute (volunteer) and International Council for QFD (volunteer); chairman of the North American Symposia on QFD (volunteer); and faculty of total quality management at the University of Michigan College of Engineering (ret.). His other affiliations include senior member of the American Society for Quality and the Japan Society for Quality Control. In addition to QFD, he has taught TRIZ (theory of inventive problem solving), analytic hierarchy process (prioritization and decision optimization), Kansei engineering (sensory and emotional requirements), Hoshin planning (strategic policy formation and deployment), total quality management (TQM), design for six sigma, and voice of customer analysis. Mr. Mazur holds an M.B.A. from the University of Michigan. HENRY (HARRY) MCDONALD is distinguished professor, chair of excellence in computational engineering, at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, where he is engaged in establishing a research and educational activity in the field of computational engineering. Previously, he was director of the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California (1996-2002). He was responsible for defining and executing the role of NASA Ames as a Center of Excellence for Information Technologies, including all research programs, approximately 1,500 civil servants, and 3,000 contractor employees. The center is heavily

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities involved in supercomputing, information technologies, and aerospace and space science research. Dr. McDonald received a D.Sc. in engineering from the University of Glasgow (Scotland) in 1985 and a B.Sc. with honors in aeronautical engineering from the University of Glasgow. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, an honorary fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. DUNCAN T. MOORE is the chief executive officer of Infotonics Technology Center, one of five Centers of Excellence in New York State since 2002. In addition, he is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake professor of optical engineering and professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Rochester. From 1995 to 1997, he was dean of engineering and applied sciences at the University, and in 1996 he also served as president of the Optical Society of America. The U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Moore in the fall of 1997 as associate director for technology in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, where he served in December 2000. In this position he worked with Dr. Neal Lane, President Clinton’s science adviser, to advise the president on U.S. technology policy. Dr. Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and governmental arenas of science and technology. He is an expert in gradient-index optics, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems, as well as the founder and former president of Gradient Lens Corporation of Rochester, NY, a company that manufactures the Hawkeye boroscope. Dr. Moore’s National Academies experience includes service as a member of the Committee on Capitalizing on Science, Technology and Innovation: An Assessment of the Small Business Innovation Research Program and chair of the Panel for Physics of the Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs. Dr. Moore holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in optics from the University of Rochester, and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Maine. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. JOSEPH MORONE was named president of Albany International in August 2005 and became chief executive officer in 2006.

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities Prior to joining Albany International, he served as president of Bentley College for eight years and, before Bentley, as dean of the Lally School of Management and Technology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Morone’s primary professional interest is in the relationship between technology and competitive advantage, particularly in the role that general business management plays in that relationship. During his tenure as president, Bentley College established itself as a national leader in integrating information technology and business education. Prior to joining Rensselaer, Morone worked for the Keyworth Company, a consulting firm that specialized in technology management and science policy, General Electric’s Corporate Research and Development, and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. His publications include Winning in High-Tech Markets (Harvard Business School Press) and The Demise of Nuclear Power: Lessons for Democratic Control of Technology (Yale University Press with E. Woodhouse). Dr. Morone has a Ph.D. from Yale University in political science. He is a member of the board of directors of both the Albany International Corporation and the TransWorld Entertainment Corporation and until July 2005 served as chairman of the board of trustees at Tufts-New England Medical Center and its Floating Hospital for Children. MARK B. MYERS is visiting executive professor in the Management Department at the Wharton Business School of the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies, with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development and technology competencies. Dr. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 36-year career in its research and development organizations. He was the senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the corporate research centers: PARC in Palo Alto, CA; Webster Center for Research & Technology near Rochester, NY; Xerox Research Centre of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario; and the Xerox Research Centre of Europe in Cambridge, UK and Grenoble, France. During this period he was a member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. He is chairman of the board of trustees of Earlham College and has held a visiting faculty position at the Stanford University and an adjunct

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities position at the University of Rochester. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Earlham College and a doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Myers served for 10 years as a member of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) and during that time was co-chair of its Committee on Intellectual Property Rights in the Knowledge-Based Economy. He is also a member of the STEP Committee on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. His other Academies experience includes service on the Board on Assessment of National Institute of Standards and Technology Programs. NICHOLAS VONORTAS is professor of economics and international affairs at the George Washington University. He is director of both the Center for International Science and Technology Policy and of the graduate program in International Science and Technology Policy at GWU’s Elliott School of International Affairs. His teaching and research interests are in industrial organization, the economics of technological change, and science and technology policy. He specializes in strategic partnerships, innovation networks, technology transfer, technology and competition policy, and the appraisal of the economic returns of R&D programs. Professor Vonortas is a founding member and serves on the steering committee of the Washington Research Evaluation Network (WREN). He is a research associate of CESPRI at Luigi Bocconi University in Milano, Italy, of LIEE at the National Technical University of Athens, and of MSL at the Athens University of Economics and Business in Greece. He has served as a consultant to many government agencies in the United States, the European Union, the Republic of Korea, and Japan, as well as to several international organizations on issues related to strategic partnerships, R&D program evaluation, science and technology indicators, innovation systems, and technology, competition, and intellectual property policy. Professor Vonortas received a Ph.D. and an M.Phil. in economics from New York University, an M.A. in economic development from Leicester University (U.K.), and a B.A. in economics from the University of Athens. TODD A. WATKINS is an associate professor of economics in the College of Business and Economics at Lehigh University and director of the Institute for the Study of Regional Political Economy. He holds Ph.D. and M.P.P. degrees from Harvard University and a B.S. from the University of Rochester.

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities His research and teaching focus on the intersection of technology, public policy, business, and economics. He has more than 40 related professional publications. His research on technology policy, defense industries, dual-use manufacturing, and the economics of innovation has been published in various journals, including Science, Technology Review, IEEE Engineering Management Review, Defence & Peace Economics, Technovation, Governance, and Research Policy. He has worked as a technology policy analyst for the Commission of the European Union and the U.S. General Accounting Office. Prior to his graduate studies, he was a practicing engineer, working in optical design and manufacturing for the Eastman Kodak Company. He has been a consultant to the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Advanced Technology Program, the U.S. Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, Arthur D. Little, the Semiconductor Research Corporation, and was a research team member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lean Aircraft Initiative, a consortium of 20 major aerospace companies. He has been a visiting scholar at the Centre for Defence Economics, University of York, England, a center associate of the Center for Trade & Commercial Diplomacy, Monterey Institute of International Studies, and a research fellow in the Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard University. DEBORAH L. WINCE-SMITH has been president of the Council on Competitiveness since December 2001. She is an internationally recognized expert on science and technology policy, innovation strategy, technology commercialization, and global competition, as well as a frequent speaker and author on these topics. Ms. Wince-Smith serves on boards, committees and policy councils of numerous high-technology companies, national nonprofits, and other organizations, including the Woodrow Wilson Center, the University of California President’s Council on National Laboratories, the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, the National Inventors Hall of Fame, the Pilgrims of the United States, and the International Women’s Forum. Most recently, Ms. Wince-Smith was appointed by the U.S. Department of Energy to be a member of the Secretary’s Task Force on the Future of Science Programs. Prior to joining the Council on Competitiveness as a senior fellow in 1993, Ms. Wince-Smith was the first assistant secretary for technology policy in the U.S. Department of Commerce. Previously, she served as assistant director for international affairs and competitiveness in the White

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities House Office of Science and Technology Policy and as a program manager at the National Science Foundation from 1976 to 1984. Trained as a classical archaeologist, Ms. Wince-Smith graduated phi beta kappa and magna cum laude from Vassar College, received her master’s degree from King’s College, Cambridge University, and conducted fieldwork in Greece. STEPHEN A. MERRILL (Project Director) has been executive director of the National Academies’ Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy (STEP) since its formation in 1991. He has directed several STEP projects in the areas of intellectual property, technical standards, taxation, human resources, and statistical as well as research and development policies. For his work on the report A Patent System for the 21st Century (2004) he was named one of the 50 most influential people worldwide in the intellectual property field by Managing Intellectual Property magazine and was awarded the Academies’ Distinguished Service Award in 2005. Prior to his appointment to the Academies’ staff, Dr. Merrill was a fellow in international business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies and served on various congressional staffs, most recently that of the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee, where he organized the first congressional hearings on international competition in the semiconductor and biotechnology industries. He holds degrees in political science from Yale (M.A., Ph.D.), Oxford (M.Phil.), and Columbia (B.A.) universities.

OCR for page 85
Aeronautics Innovation: NASA’s Challenges and Opportunities This page intentionally left blank.