APPENDIX D
WORKSHOP PARTICIPANT BIOGRAPHIES

Ronald Birk is the Director of the Earth Science Applications Division for the Office of Earth Science at NASA. He is responsible for oversight of integrated system solutions that use Earth system science observations and model predictions of weather, climate and natural hazards for national and international applications enabling decision support through partnerships with federal agencies and national organizations. Ron has over 18 years of experience in the development and management of integrating remote sensing systems and related science and technology research and development results into practical applications to serve society. His representative current roles include: CCTP, Chair of the Measurement and Monitoring Working Group; CCSP, Lead for Synthesis and Assessment Reports 5-1, Co-Lead for 5-2; IWGEO, Co-Chair of the Planning and Integration Team; GEO, Alternate Chair for the Architecture SubGroup; and CRSSP, Senior Steering Committee.


Kenneth Bridbord is Director of International Training and Research in the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. He is a graduate of Cooper Union (Bachelors in Chemical Engineering), University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine (M.D.), and Harvard School of Public Health (M.P.H.). He is clinically trained in pediatrics. For nearly 33 years, he has been involved in public health research and preventive medicine with the U.S. federal government. Dr. Bridbord began his federal career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and later joined the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 1983, Dr. Bridbord has been with the Fogarty International Center, where for the past nine years he has been Director of the Division of International Training and Research.


In 1975, Dr. Bridbord was awarded a Silver Medal from the EPA for his work developing the health basis for reducing lead in gasoline and for his contributions to the regulations that began the process of phasing lead out of gasoline. At NIOSH, Dr. Bridbord made important contributions to the development of strategies and policies to limit occupational exposures to lead, reproductive hazards, and carcinogens. Dr. Bridbord has contributed substantially to the development of a wide range of international training and research capacity-building programs in developing countries to combat global health threats, beginning in 1988 with the AIDS International Training and Research Program, which trains developing country scientists to address the AIDS epidemic primarily through prevention research, combining biomedical and behavioral interventions. In 2001, Dr. Bridbord was honored with the American Association for the Advancement of Science Award for International Scientific Cooperation. Dr. Bridbord was honored for his decisive impact in training researchers worldwide for productive and collaborative public health research, and for significantly expanding training and collaborative research on AIDS.



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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop APPENDIX D WORKSHOP PARTICIPANT BIOGRAPHIES Ronald Birk is the Director of the Earth Science Applications Division for the Office of Earth Science at NASA. He is responsible for oversight of integrated system solutions that use Earth system science observations and model predictions of weather, climate and natural hazards for national and international applications enabling decision support through partnerships with federal agencies and national organizations. Ron has over 18 years of experience in the development and management of integrating remote sensing systems and related science and technology research and development results into practical applications to serve society. His representative current roles include: CCTP, Chair of the Measurement and Monitoring Working Group; CCSP, Lead for Synthesis and Assessment Reports 5-1, Co-Lead for 5-2; IWGEO, Co-Chair of the Planning and Integration Team; GEO, Alternate Chair for the Architecture SubGroup; and CRSSP, Senior Steering Committee. Kenneth Bridbord is Director of International Training and Research in the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. He is a graduate of Cooper Union (Bachelors in Chemical Engineering), University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine (M.D.), and Harvard School of Public Health (M.P.H.). He is clinically trained in pediatrics. For nearly 33 years, he has been involved in public health research and preventive medicine with the U.S. federal government. Dr. Bridbord began his federal career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and later joined the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 1983, Dr. Bridbord has been with the Fogarty International Center, where for the past nine years he has been Director of the Division of International Training and Research. In 1975, Dr. Bridbord was awarded a Silver Medal from the EPA for his work developing the health basis for reducing lead in gasoline and for his contributions to the regulations that began the process of phasing lead out of gasoline. At NIOSH, Dr. Bridbord made important contributions to the development of strategies and policies to limit occupational exposures to lead, reproductive hazards, and carcinogens. Dr. Bridbord has contributed substantially to the development of a wide range of international training and research capacity-building programs in developing countries to combat global health threats, beginning in 1988 with the AIDS International Training and Research Program, which trains developing country scientists to address the AIDS epidemic primarily through prevention research, combining biomedical and behavioral interventions. In 2001, Dr. Bridbord was honored with the American Association for the Advancement of Science Award for International Scientific Cooperation. Dr. Bridbord was honored for his decisive impact in training researchers worldwide for productive and collaborative public health research, and for significantly expanding training and collaborative research on AIDS.

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop James L. Buizer is on loan from NOAA’s Office of Global Programs to the Arizona State University where he serves as Executive Director of Sustainability Initiatives and Special Advisor to the President. He also serves as Director for Science Applications with the Office of the Vice President for Research and Economic Affairs. He is responsible for the design and implementation of university-wide sustainability research, education, and applications initiatives. At NOAA he served as Director of the Climate and Societal Interactions Program of the Office of Global Programs, where he built a number of programs that bridge science and society. He received his degrees in Oceanography, Marine Resource Economics, and Science Policy from the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. William Clark is Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy, and Human Development at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Clark was trained as an ecologist, and now works on the linkages between environmental change and economic development. He has recently completed a large collaborative study on “Learning to Manage Global Environmental Risks” (MIT Press), tracing the history of how countries around the world came to address the problems of acid rain, ozone depletion, and climate change. For the last five years, he has co-directed the Global Environmental Assessment Project, a research and training effort to improve the effectiveness of scientific advice in international environmental policy making. Clark has been involved in research on sustainability issues since his early work with Buzz Holling on “Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management” (Wiley Publishers, 1979) and Bruce Johnston on “Redesigning Rural Development: A Strategic Perspective” (Hopkins University Press, 1982). Before joining Harvard in 1987, he led the program on sustainable development of the biosphere at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Austria. More recently he co-chaired (with Bob Kates) the U.S. National Research Council’s study Our Common Journey: A Transition Toward Sustainability (National Academy Press, 1999). He is now deeply involved in the international Initiative on Science and Technology for Sustainability. Jeffrey Cochrane is an information technology specialist for the US Agency for International Development, with 15 years experience focusing on access to basic telecommunications for poor communities around the world. He is currently Coordinator of USAID’s Last Mile Initiative, which seeks to transform rural economies by extending the world’s telecommunications networks to reach those not presently well served, with a particular emphasis on innovative applications of wireless technologies, and on innovative business models for low-income consumers. Dr. Cochrane holds a Ph.D. in resource economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has taught economics at the University of Sierra Leone, and has personally lived and worked overseas for extensive periods in Kenya, Sierra Leone, and the Central African Republic. Robert A. Frosch is Senior Research Associate in the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University. He is a theoretical physicist by education. (A.B., Columbia College; Ph.D., Columbia University). He conducted research in ocean acoustics at Columbia and later served as Director for Nuclear Test Detection, and Deputy Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency in the Department of Defense, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research and Development, Assistant Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme, Associate Director for Applied Oceanography of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Administrator of NASA, President of the American Association of

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Engineering Societies, and Vice President of General Motors Corporation (GM) in charge of research laboratories. He retired from GM in 1993 before joining the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Foreign Member of the U.K. Royal Academy of Engineering, and a fellow or member of a number of professional societies. Laura Holliday serves as Senior Program Associate for the National Academies’ Science and Technology for Sustainability Program. In this role, she staffs the workshop series “Strengthening Science-Based Decision-Making in Developing Countries” and the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability, including its task force “Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development.” Ms. Holliday also provides research support for the study “Science and Technology to Support Foreign Assistance: Imperatives for AID and its Partners.” Previous Academies’ projects she has worked on include the Committee on Toxicological Effects of Methylmercury, the Standing Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, Health, and the Environment, and the Committee on Biological Threats to Agricultural Plants and Animals. Prior to her experience at the National Academies, Ms. Holliday researched and translated German environmental regulations and technical documents for Argonne National Laboratory and worked as an intern the Salzburg Seminar in Austria. Laura graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa from Middlebury College with a B.A. in International Politics and French. She was a Max Kade Fellow at the Institute for Contemporary Germanic Studies at Indiana University and has an M.S. in Environmental Sciences and Policy from Johns Hopkins University. She speaks fluent German, French, and conversational Mandarin Chinese. Gerald T. Keusch is Assistant Provost of the Medical Campus and Associate Dean of the School of Public Health at Boston University. Dr. Keusch is a graduate of Columbia College and Harvard Medical School, and he is Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases. He has been involved in clinical medicine, teaching and research for his entire career, most recently as Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine and Senior Attending Physician and Chief of the Division of Geographic Medicine and Infectious Diseases, at the New England Medical Center in Boston, MA. His research has ranged from the molecular pathogenesis of tropical infectious diseases to field research in nutrition, immunology, host susceptibility, and the treatment of tropical infectious diseases and HIV/AIDS. Prior to joining the National Institutes of Health as Associate Director for International Research and Director of the Fogarty International Center in October 1998, he was a Faculty Associate at Harvard Institute for International Development and Director of the Health Office. Dr. Keusch is the author of over 300 original publications, reviews and book chapters, and he is the editor of 8 scientific books. He is the recipient of the Squibb, Finland and Bristol awards of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and has delivered numerous named lectures including the Health-Clark Lecture at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Wesley Spink Lecture at the University of Minnesota, and the William Kirby Lecture at the University of Washington. He is involved in international health research and policy issues within the NIH, the Institute of Medicine, and the World Health Organization. Under his leadership, the programs of the Fogarty International Center have greatly expanded to address not only the pressing global issues in infectious diseases and the growing burden of non-communicable diseases, but also such critical cross-cutting issues as the ethical conduct of

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop research, intellectual property rights and global public goods, stigma, and the impact of improved health on economic development. Stephen Lingle is currently the Director of the Environmental Engineering Research Division in the National Center for Environmental Research at the US Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC. He directs competitive extramural research in the physical and chemical sciences, technology development, economics and social sciences. The primary focus of this research is to establish a scientific basis for more sustainable products and processes in industrial and other sectors of the economy. Research is conducted principally through two competitive extramural programs, the Science to Achieve Results (STAR) program and the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. Prior to this position, Mr. Lingle served in EPA’s Superfund program, Office of Solid Waste and Office of Water. Mr. Lingle holds a BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Illinois and an MBA from Indiana University. James R. Mahoney is the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and NOAA Deputy Administrator, US Department of Commerce and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration since 2002. He received a B.S. degree in Physics from LeMoyne College and a Ph.D. degree from MIT. His career since college has involved more than 40 years of continuous focus on environmental management and the Earth sciences, with an emphasis on the atmospheric, climate, hydrological and oceanographic areas. He has undertaken diverse responsibilities in academic, corporate, national government and international settings. Drawing upon his Harvard experience, Mahoney co-founded the environmental management company Environmental Research & Technology Inc. in 1968. In 1984, Mahoney moved to the position of director of the Environmental Industries Center at the Bechtel Group, Inc., in San Francisco. In this position he supervised Bechtel’s domestic and international environmental programs. Mahoney entered full-time public service in 1988 as director of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, working in the Executive Office of the President. His service as NAPAP director included the completion of the ten-year program involving the work of more than 2,000 technical and economic specialists; the publication of a major, internationally reviewed acid rain science and technology compendium; and extensive issue analyses supporting the development of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mahoney was senior vice president of the IT Group Inc., an international environmental management firm, from 1991 to 1999. During 2000 and 2001, Mahoney worked as an environmental advisor on several domestic and international matters. Mahoney has worked in more than 50 other nations in several different roles: negotiating and overseeing international joint venture technical companies, representing the U.S. government in specialist exchanges, advising government agencies (particularly in developing nations) on sustainable industry, fishery, and agricultural practices, and advising several United Nations and other international agencies. Mahoney is a Fellow and former president of the 12,000-member American Meteorological Society. As a result of a strategic review initiated during his term as president, AMS committed to a long-term program of support for science education at all levels, encouragement of technical careers for minority students, and the application of sound science to complex public issues.

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Pamela Matson is Naramore Dean of the School of Earth Sciences and Goldman Professor of Environmental Science at Stanford University. Her current research interests include biogeochemical processes in forest and agricultural systems. Dr. Matson was the first to show that geographic variation in biogeochemistry of terrestrial ecosystems controls variation in the production of the important greenhouse gas N2O. That discovery provided the foundation for her development of global budgets of natural and anthropogenic sources of this and other radiatively significant trace gases. Dr. Matson has served on numerous National Academies’ committees, including the Board on Sustainable Development, the Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA, the Board on Global Change, and others. She is President of the Ecological Society of America, a member of the Aspen Global Change Institute Advisory Board, and a member of the Institute of Ecosystem Studies Advisory Board. Selected publications include Ecosystem Approach for the Development of a Global Nitrous Oxide Budget; Agricultural Intensification and Ecosystem Properties; and Integration of Environmental, Agronomic, and Economic Aspects of Fertilizer Management. Dr. Matson received her B.S. in Biology from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire; her M.S. in Environmental Science from Indiana University; and her Ph.D. in Forest Ecology from Oregon State University. J. Todd Mitchell is President of Houston Advanced Research Center. He has served as chairman of the Board since August 2000 and was elected president of HARC on May 24, 2001. Mr. Mitchell is also president of GPM, Inc. of Houston, a private company that manages a variety of assets, including oil and gas properties, ranching, timber, real estate, and hospitality businesses. From 1987 to 1998, Mitchell was president of Dolomite Resources, Inc., an investment company that focuses on oil and gas exploration and geoscience technology. In addition, Mitchell serves on the Board of Directors of Mitchell Energy and Development Corp., and the Center for the Performing Arts at The Woodlands (home of The Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion) and has served on the State Advisory Board of the Nature Conservancy of Texas. Claudia Nierenberg is the Acting Director for the Climate and Societal Interactions Division in NOAA’s Office of Global Programs. She has served as the Program Manager for both the Human Dimensions of Global Change Program and the Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessment Program. Claudia served as a lead author for the CCSP Decision Support chapter and is a past co-chair of the USGCRP Human Dimensions interagency committee. She has held positions on Capitol Hill and at the Department of the Treasury. She holds a Masters degree in International Political Economy from Columbia University, and a Bachelors degree in English Literature from the University of Virginia. Bhavani Pathak is currently a Biotechnology Advisor in the Office of Environment and Science Policy at USAID’s Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade Bureau. She has been with USAID since 2000, initially as a AAAS Diplomacy Fellow, and joined as staff in 2003. She provides technical assistance to USAID offices and field mission on a wide range of biotechnology research and policy issues. She also oversees the Agricultural Biotechnology Support Project II, the Agency’s lead technology development project, led by Cornell University. Prior to this appointment, she was with the American Association for the Advancement of Science for two years working on science education issues. Bhavani holds a Ph.D. from the University of Cincinnati in molecular biology, and obtained post-doctoral training at the Frederick Cancer Research and Development Center, Frederick, Maryland.

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Vernon W. Ruttan is Regents’ Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Economics and Applied Economics at the University of Minnesota. His research has been in the field of agricultural development, resource economics, and research policy. Dr. Ruttan is the author of several books including Agricultural Research Policy (1982); Agricultural Development: An International Perspective (1985); Agriculture, Environment, and Health: Sustainable Development in the 21st Century (1994); United States Development Assistance Policy: The Domestic Politics of Foreign Economic Aid (1996); and Technology, Growth and Development (2002). Dr. Ruttan has been elected a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1976), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1986), and a member of the National Academy of Sciences (1990) for his development of a function showing how agricultural research responds to particular national land and labor scarcities. Dr. Ruttan has served on the National Academies’ Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, Health, and the Environment; Board on Sustainable Development; Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change; and many other National Academies’ committees. He attended Yale University (B.A., 1948) and the University of Chicago (M.A., 1952; Ph.D, 1954). Joel D. Scheraga is the National Program Director for the Global Change Research Program in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Research and Development. He is responsible for managing a $22.6 million research program and over 45 personnel in five laboratories and centers. Dr. Scheraga directs policy-relevant assessments of the potential impacts of global change (particularly climate change and climate variability) on air quality, water quality, ecosystems, and human health. Dr. Scheraga was Chair of the U.S. Global Change Research Program’s National Assessment Workgroup from 2000 to 2002 and Vice Chair from 1998 to 2000. The workgroup was responsible for managing the U.S. National Assessment process which resulted in the report to Congress entitled, Climate Change Impacts on the United States: The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change. Dr. Scheraga is actively involved in international research and assessment activities. He is a co-editor and lead author of the book, Climate Change and Human Health: Risks and Responses, released by the World Health Organization in December 2003. He co-authored a white paper in 2003 on the effects of climate change on water quality in the Great Lakes region for the US/Canada International Joint Commission’s Water Quality Board. He was a lead author of the 1997 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) North American Regional Assessment, and an Assisting Lead Author for the 1994 IPCC Technical Guidelines for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Adaptations. Prior to joining EPA, he was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Rutgers University from 1981 to 1987, and a Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics at Princeton University from 1985 to 1986. He has published numerous articles on global climate change, environmental economics, public policy, the integration of science and policy in multidisciplinary programs, and applied microeconomics and microeconomic theory. He has received five EPA Bronze Medals. Most recently, he received a Bronze Medal for Commendable Service in September 2003 in recognition of “outstanding, sustained contributions to lasting environmental protection of the Great Lakes—the world’s largest freshwater lake system—through a US/Canada partnership.” Dr. Scheraga received an A.B. degree in geology-mathematics/physics from Brown University in 1976, an M.A. in economics from Brown University in 1979, and a Ph.D. in economics from Brown University in 1981.

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Ed Sheffner is Program Manager in the Earth Science Applications Division of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. He is currently responsible for managing three national application areas—carbon sequestration, invasive species, and agricultural efficiency. Prior to coming to NASA Headquarters, Sheffner was a Research Scientist and Adjunct Faculty with California State University Monterey Bay. His career includes four years as the site manager for the TGS Technology support contract for the Earth Science Division at the Ames Research Center, an appointment with the University Space Research Association in Washington, DC providing technical support to NASA on the Landsat 7 Program, technical consultant on remote sensing for the UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific in Bangkok, Thailand, research on remote sensing applications for local projects in California and the West, and regional projects such as the NASA LACIE and AgRISTARS programs. Sheffner received a B.A. in History and a M.A. in Geography from the University of California. Emmy Simmons is Assistant Administrator for the Bureau for Economic Growth, Agriculture and Trade at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Ms. Simmons was a Deputy Assistant Administrator and Director of USAID’s Center for Economic Growth and Agricultural Development in the Global Bureau before assuming her present position. Ms. Simmons has been with USAID since 1977. Her positions have included overseas posts as a Regional Agricultural Economist with the Sahel Development Planning Team in Mali; Supervisory Agricultural Officer, also in Mali; Director of the Regional Program Economics Office for REDSO in Kenya; and Director of the Office for Program and Project Development in Russia. Ms. Simmons holds a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics from Cornell University and a B.A. in International Relations from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Stacey Speer is the Senior Project Assistant for the Science and Technology for Sustainability Program and the Science, Technology, and Law Program. She joined The National Academies in September 2002, as the Christine Mirzayan Intern. Ms. Speer received her M.S. in Forensic Science from George Washington University in 2004. Miss Speer received her B.S. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Tennessee in May 2002. Gregory H. Symmes serves as Associate Executive Director of the Division on Earth and Life Studies of the National Academies. In this capacity, Dr. Symmes is responsible for coordinating the activities of the National Academies in the area of global change science and technology and for managing the review of over 75 reports each year. Dr. Symmes also serves as Director of the Coordinating Committee on Global Change and as Director of the Roundtable on Science and Technology for Sustainability. Dr. Symmes has directed National Academies’ studies in the following areas of science and technology policy: climate change science; peer review processes and science and technology needs for the Department of Energy’s radioactive waste management efforts; regulation of hardrock mining on federal lands; and competitive research within the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Before joining the National Academies in 1995, Dr. Symmes served as a research assistant professor and postdoctoral associate in the Department of Earth and Space Sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He received his Ph.D. in Geology from Johns Hopkins University and his B.A. summa cum laude in Geology from Amherst College.

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Woody Turner is the Program Scientist for Biological Diversity in the NASA Office of Earth Science. He is currently starting two programs within the agency. One is a research effort using NASA imagery and data products to improve understanding of how climate and other environmental factors affect and are affected by biological diversity. The other is an applications program in ecological forecasting, which brings together data and ecosystem models from the research program and other activities to address the needs of NASA’s partner agencies for predictive models of the impacts of environmental changes on ecosystems. Mr. Turner has master’s degrees in sustainable development and conservation biology from the University of Maryland and public affairs (international relations) from the Woodrow Wilson School. William A. (Bill) Wallace is the Founder and President of Wallace Futures Group, LLC, an organization through which he provides consulting services in the areas of policy planning, market and trends analyses, forecasting, and future studies. In addition, he has written a book, Becoming Part of the Solution: A Consulting Engineers’ Guide to Sustainable Development. Bill has 40 years of professional experience, including 30 years in the field of environmental engineering and management. He recently retired from CH2M HILL where for over 20 years he served in a number of senior positions in hazardous waste management, strategic planning, marketing, and new markets and technologies. He also served a three-year term on the CH2M HILL Board of Directors. Bill is a recognized expert in the field of environmental management. He has been invited to testify many times before congressional committees on matters of environmental technology and policy. For the past five years, he served as CH2M HILL’s Liaison Delegate to the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). He helped prepare WBCSD policies on sustainable development reporting and led the preparation of the council’s comments to the Guidelines of the UN-sponsored Global Reporting Initiative. He was also one of two primary reviewers on the council’s report to the World Summit on Sustainable Development, Tomorrow’s Markets: Global Trends and Their Implications for Business. Bill is currently a member of the American Council of Engineering Companies’ Environmental Business Committee, and prepared this organization’s national policy on sustainability. He is the chairman of International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) Sustainable Development Task Force, which is developing a process for creating sustainable development project goals and indicators. He helped draft UNEP’s Consulting Engineers’ Report to the World Summit on Sustainable Development. Bill received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Clarkson University, and an M.S. in Management from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He completed the Advanced Management Program at Harvard Business School. John Warner is Professor of Chemistry and Director of University of Massachusetts Center for Green Chemistry at the University of Massachusetts Boston. He worked at the Polaroid Corporation for nine years, and then went to UMASS Boston, where he has started the world’s first Green Chemistry Ph.D. program. He directs a large research group working on a diverse set of projects involving green chemistry using principles of crystal engineering, molecular recognition, and self assembly. His work combines aspects of community outreach, government policy and industrial collaboration. He is associate editor of the journal Organic Preparations and Procedures International and on the editorial board of Crystal Engineering and Crystal Growth and Design. He recently received the Outstanding Service to Nursing Award from the

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Linking Knowledge with Action for Sustainable Development: The Role of Program Management - Summary of a Workshop Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing. He was awarded the American Institute of Chemistry’s Northeast Distinguished Chemist of the Year for 2002. His recent patents in the fields of semiconductor design, biodegradable plastics and polymeric photoresists are examples of how green chemistry principles can be immediately incorporated into commercially relevant applications. Professor Warner is co-author of the book Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice and serves on the Board of Directors of the Green Chemistry Institute in Washington, D.C. He received his B.S. in Chemistry from UMASS, Boston, and his M.S. and Ph.D. from Princeton in Organic Chemistry.