Appendix I
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

MYRON M. LEVINE, M.D., (Chair) is the director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is head of the Division of Geographic Medicine in the Department of Medicine. He is also visiting professor in the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, and the Faculdad de Medicina, Universidad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. He received a B.S. from the City University of New York, M.D. from the Medical College of Virginia, and a D.T.P.H. with distinction from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Levine is a member of numerous international advisory committees including the WHO Vaccine Advisory Committee and the Advisory Board to the Center for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Oxford University, and was a member of the working group of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization during its tenure. He has received prestigious research and other awards including the Albert B Sabin Gold medal award and is holder or coholder of seven patents. Dr. Levine was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1995


GRAHAM V. BROWN, M.B., B.S., F.R.A.C.P., M.P.H., Ph.D., a physician, is James Stewart Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne, Australia and heads the Department of Medicine at the Royal Melbourne and Western hospitals. He is also head of the Victorian Infectious Diseases Service of the Royal Melbourne Hospital and



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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program Appendix I Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE MEMBERS MYRON M. LEVINE, M.D., (Chair) is the director of the Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is head of the Division of Geographic Medicine in the Department of Medicine. He is also visiting professor in the Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand, and the Faculdad de Medicina, Universidad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru. He received a B.S. from the City University of New York, M.D. from the Medical College of Virginia, and a D.T.P.H. with distinction from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Dr. Levine is a member of numerous international advisory committees including the WHO Vaccine Advisory Committee and the Advisory Board to the Center for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Oxford University, and was a member of the working group of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization during its tenure. He has received prestigious research and other awards including the Albert B Sabin Gold medal award and is holder or coholder of seven patents. Dr. Levine was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1995 GRAHAM V. BROWN, M.B., B.S., F.R.A.C.P., M.P.H., Ph.D., a physician, is James Stewart Professor of Medicine at the University of Melbourne, Australia and heads the Department of Medicine at the Royal Melbourne and Western hospitals. He is also head of the Victorian Infectious Diseases Service of the Royal Melbourne Hospital and

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program interim director, Nossal Institute of Global Health. Previously he held positions at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and was head of the Division of Infection and Immunity. He received his M.B.B.S. (first class honors in Medicine) and Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne, and M.P.H. from Harvard University. In addition to his clinical expertise in tropical medicine and infectious diseases, Dr. Brown was a member of the team that developed combination B vaccine and protocols for the first phase 2 clinical trial of a blood-stage malaria vaccine in Papua New Guinea in 1998. He is author or coauthor of 187 publications. Dr. Brown was formerly a member of the Strategic Advisory Council of the Bill and Melinda Gates Children’s Vaccine Program. He currently serves on numerous advisory boards including the Malaria Vaccine Advisory Committee of WHO and the Scientific Consultants Group of the USAID Malaria Vaccine Development Program. MICHAEL F. GOOD, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR), Brisbane, Australia, an institution with a longstanding major focus on tropical diseases (especially malaria) and vaccine research. QIMR has conducted Phase 1 and Phase 2 malaria vaccine trials with partners in Papua New Guinea and collaborates extensively with the biotechnology industry. Prior to his appointment as director in 2000, Dr. Good was director of the Cooperative Research Centre for Vaccine Technology at QIMR. Dr. Good received his B.Sc. and M.D. from the University of Queensland and Ph.D. from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research in Melbourne, Australia, after which he undertook postdoctoral training followed by a visiting scientist position in the Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases at the NIH (1985–1988). Dr. Good has an outstanding research record with over 220 publications, and he has been awarded the prestigious Fulbright and Neil Hamilton Fairley Fellow-ships. He is the immediate past president of the Association of Australian Medical Research Institutes. His major contributions and research interests lie in the areas of immunity, immunopathogenesis and vaccine development for malaria and group A streptococcus/rheumatic fever. DAVID C. KASLOW, M.D., is chief scientific officer of Vical Inc., where he oversees research and development, including discovery, clinical, regulatory and quality functions for Vical’s pharmaceutical product candidates for infectious diseases and cancer based on patented gene delivery technology. Dr. Kaslow has an outstanding research career during which he has led research groups at the National Institutes of Health and at Merck & Co., with extensive experience in vaccines and malaria. He received a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of California, Davis, and M.D. from University of California, San Francisco, followed by a fellowship in

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program human genetics at Johns Hopkins. He joined NIH in 1986 where he held senior research positions including head of Recombinant Protein Development Unit, head of Malaria Vaccine Development Unit and head of the Molecular Vaccine Section in the Laboratory of Malaria Research. From 1999 he was senior director of vaccine research and then head of the Department of Vaccine Research and Technology at Merck & Co. Dr. Kaslow is the author or coauthor of 122 scientific papers and 22 review articles/book chapters, and holds or coholds 13 patents. MARGARET A. LIU, M.D., is vice chair of Transgene, SA and a visiting professor at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. She is a pioneer in the area of DNA vaccines, author or coauthor of 128 publications and the inventor for six issued patents. She was formerly the senior adviser in vaccinology for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, vice-president of vaccines research and gene therapy at Chiron Corporation, and senior director of virus and cell biology at Merck & Co. She is currently chair of the Scientific Advisory Group of the International Vaccine Institute (in Seoul) and a scientific advisor for the AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition. She is also a former member of the European Developing Country Clinical Trials Partnership Board (based in The Hague), the WHO Initiative for Vaccine Research Vaccine Advisory Committee, and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization R&D Task Force during its tenure. Dr. Liu received her B.A. (summa cum laude) in chemistry from Colorado College and her M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Liu was named one of “The 50 Most Important Women Scientists” by Discover magazine in November 2002. GARY J. NABEL, M.D., Ph.D., is director of the Vaccine Research Center at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. Prior to this appointment in 1999, he was professor of internal medicine and of biological chemistry at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator. Dr. Nabel’s expertise is in the area of viral gene expression, vaccines and gene transfer therapy. He has made important contributions to knowledge of gene regulation and immune system activation in the HIV virus, and to DNA-based vaccine research for HIV and other diseases. Dr. Nabel graduated magna cum laude from Harvard and completed the M.D./Ph.D. program there in 1982. His subsequent positions include director of the Center for Gene Therapy and co-director of the Center for Molecular Medicine at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. He has received the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Amgen Scientific Achievement award and has served on several NIH advisory committees

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program including the NIAID AIDS Vaccine Research Advisory Committee. Dr Nabel was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine in 1998. ELIZABETH NARDIN, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Division of Molecular Medicine at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine, which has a strong focus on malaria biology and vaccine development. Her research interests lie in the mechanisms of T-and B-cell mediated vaccine-induced immunity to malaria parasites, especially the preerythrocytic stages, with an emphasis on development and testing of synthetic peptide malaria vaccines. Her research has included Phase 1 and Phase 2 trials of novel peptide and recombinant vaccine constructs, and development of innovative efficacy testing systems for challenge trials. She received her M.S. from New York University and Ph.D. in parasitology from the NYU School of Medicine, Department of Microbiology, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in the Department of Pathology. Dr. Nardin was recipient of the Irma T Hirshi Trust Career Scientist Award during 1992 to 1997. She has served as grant reviewer for several international and national organizations including the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Tropical Medicine and Parasitology Study Sections and most recently the Clinical Research Study Section. N. REGINA RABINOVICH, M.D., M.P.H., directs the Infectious Diseases Division of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Health Program. Dr. Rabinovich obtained her M.D. at Southern Illinois University. Her training includes clinical pediatrics at the University of North Carolina [UNC)], epidemiology at UNC and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases [NIAID], and a M.P.H. at UNC. She spent 11 years at the NIAID where she served as chief of the Clinical and Regulatory Affairs Branch of the Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and oversaw a network of extramural units that tested vaccines and drugs in the United States. During her tenure, the units completed large multi-center trials of pertussis and influenza vaccines, as well as phase I trials of new technologies and vaccines such as malaria and rotavirus. She became director of the PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative in 1999, creating and leading a team to advance development of malaria vaccines for children in endemic countries. Dr. Rabinovich received NIH Awards for her contributions and advocacy for vaccine research and the Children’s Vaccine Initiative. She has participated in review panels for the NIH and the Institute of Medicine, and serves on international advisory boards including the Medicines for Malaria Venture, INDEPTH, AMANET and the Institute of One World Health.

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program ALAN R. SHAW, Ph.D., is currently the president and chief executive officer of VaxInnate, a biotechnology company making vaccines that incorporate activators of the innate immune system. Prior to this, he was the executive director of Virus & Cell Biology at Merck Research Laboratories, and was responsible for all aspects of live virus vaccine research, as well as technical aspects of development and production. He was also responsible for research and early development of recombinant protein-based vaccines. Dr. Shaw has been instrumental in the development of Varivax, ProQuad®, RotaTeq®, Gardasil®, the zoster vaccine Zostavax®, as well as numerous early-stage experimental vaccines. Prior to joining Merck, Dr. Shaw worked on vaccines for hepatitis B and Plasmodium falciparum as well as cytokines, cell trafficking and natural inhibitors of interleukin-1 at Biogen, SA in Geneva, Switzerland. Dr. Shaw received a B.A. from Rice University, a M.S. in molecular biology from the University of Texas at Dallas, and a Ph.D. in molecular biology at the Medical College of Ohio. He had postdoctoral fellowships at the International Institute of Cellular Pathology in Brussels and The Rockefeller University. Dr. Shaw is the past chairman of the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association Biologicals Committee and a part-time member of the faculty at Temple University. H. KYLE WEBSTER, Ph.D., has had a distinguished military career with 27 years experience primarily at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, including 11 years (1981–1991) as chief of the Department of Immunology and Parasitology at the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences in Bangkok, Thailand. While in Thailand, he directed the first military malaria vaccine trial. He retired as chief, Department of Parasitology at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in Washington, D.C. in 1993, and has since worked in senior positions in industry in the United States and Asia for Becton Dickinson, most recently including vice-president for strategic initiatives (2001–2005). Dr Webster was educated at Georgetown University (B.Sc., Ph.D. with distinction) and at the Stanford University/National University of Singapore International Executive Business Program. He is author or coauthor of 162 publications on basic and applied aspects of infectious diseases and immunology, especially on malaria including diagnostics as well as drug and vaccine development. He currently works as an independent consultant in malaria and infectious diseases. KATHRYN C. ZOON, Ph.D., is the acting director of the Division of Intramural Research, NIAID, NIH, and deputy director for planning and development of the Division of Intramural Research of NIAID. Previously

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program she was the principal deputy director of the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute of the NIH. She served as the director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), Food and Drug Administration, and was a member of the NIH Scientific Directors from 1992 to 2003. Dr. Zoon was the director of the Division of Cytokine Biology in CBER, 1988-–1992 where she directed the research and review of cytokines, growth factors, and cellular products. She received her B.S. degree, cum laude, in chemistry from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and her Ph.D. in biochemistry from The Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Zoon is the author of over 100 scientific papers and has received numerous awards, including the Meritorious Executive Rank Award 1994 for revitalizing and reorganizing the CBER and several DHHS Secretary’s Awards for Distinguished Service (1998–2005) while at the FDA. Dr. Zoon was elected to the Institute of Medicine in October 2002. STUDY STAFF PATRICIA M. GRAVES, M.S.P.H., Ph.D., is the consulting scientist and senior editor. A graduate of Cambridge University, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (Ph.D.) and the University of Colorado (M.S.P.H.), she is a specialist in the epidemiology and control of vector-borne diseases, especially malaria and filariasis. She currently works as an independent consultant for national and international scientific and overseas aid organizations. Previously she conducted laboratory and field research on malaria at the National Institutes of Health, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research and the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Australia. She is honorary fellow at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and an author and editor for the Cochrane Collaboration Infectious Disease Group. FREDERICK (RICK) ERDTMANN, M.D., M.P.H., is Director of the Medical Follow-up Agency of the Institute of Medicine at the National Academies. He attended medical school in Philadelphia where he earned his M.D. degree from Temple University School of Medicine, and holds a M.P.H. from the University of California at Berkeley. He completed a residency program in general preventive medicine at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in 1975, and is board certified in that specialty. Dr. Erdtmann’s assignments with the Army Medical Department include chief of the preventive medicine services at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Frankfurt Army Medical Center in Germany, and Madigan Army Medical Center. He also served as division surgeon for the Second Infantry Division in Tongduchon, Korea. He later served as deputy chief of staff

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Battling Malaria: Strengthening the U.S. Military Malaria Vaccine Program for clinical operations within DoD’s TRICARE Region 1, prior to assuming hospital command at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in March 1998. Following that he was assigned to the Office of the Surgeon General as the Deputy Assistant Surgeon General for Force Development. In 2001, following 30 years of commissioned military service, Dr. Erdtmann joined the National Academies as Director of the Medical Follow-up Agency and also serves as Director of the Board on Military and Veterans Health. REINE HOMAWOO is a senior program assistant with the Medical Follow-up Agency. PAMELA RAMEY-McCRAY is the administrative assistant for the Medical Follow-up Agency.

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