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Appendix B Biographical Sketches for Committee on the Collaborative Large-scale Engineering Analysis Network for Environmental Research (CLEANER) Daniel P. Loucks (NAE), Chair, is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University where he applies systems analysis, economic theory, ecology, and environmental engineering to problems in regional development and environmental quality management. At Cornell, he has served as Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and as Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies in the College of Engineering. Dr. Loucks has also worked as a consultant to private and government agencies and various organizations of the United Nations, World Bank, and NATO on regional water resources development planning throughout the world. He has been a member of various committees of the national Research Council and currently serves on the Committee on Integrated Observations for Hydrologic and Related Sciences. Dr. Loucks was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1989. He received his M.F. in forestry from Yale University and his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University. Pedro J. Alvarez is the George R. Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University and the new chair of the department. He previously taught at the University of Iowa, where he also served as associate director for the Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing and as Honorary Consul for Nicaragua. Dr. Alvarez's research interests are related to the applications and implications of biological processes in natural and engineered systems, including bioremediation and phytoremediation of sites contaminated with hazardous wastes. He was inducted into the American Academy of Environmental Engineers in 1995 and is also the president elect for the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. Dr. Alvarez received a B. Eng. degree in Civil Engineering from McGill University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in environmental engineering from the University of Michigan. Mary Jo Baedecker is a scientist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey. She previously served as Chief Scientist for Hydrology where she provided oversight for the National Research Program in the hydrologic sciences and represented the hydrology discipline in long-range program planning at the USGS. Dr. Baedecker's research interests include the degradation and attenuation of organic contaminants in hydrologic environments. She is a member of the 58

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Appendix B 59 NRC's Water Science and Technology Board and has served on several NRC committees including the Committee on Ground Water Cleanup Alternatives and the Committee on Source Removal of Contaminants in the Subsurface. Dr. Baedecker holds a B.A. in chemistry from Vanderbilt University, an M.S. in chemistry from the University of Kentucky, and a Ph.D. in geochemistry from George Washington University. James W. Boyd is Senior Fellow and Director of the Energy and Natural Resources Division at Resources for the Future. Dr. Boyd's research is in the fields of environmental regulation, law, and economics, focusing on the analysis of environmental institutions and policy. Specific areas of expertise include water regulation, environmental and product liability law, incentive-based regulation, and ecological benefit and damage assessment. His current research focuses on the development of environmental benefit indicators for use in both environmental management and national welfare accounting. Dr. Boyd has been a visiting faculty member at the Olin Business School, Washington University, St. Louis, and he currently serves on a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Science Advisory Board on Valuing the Protection of Ecological Systems and Services. He has been a consultant to, among others, the World Bank, the European Commission, the Harvard Institute for International Development, and various government agencies. Dr. Boyd holds a B.A. in history from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. in public policy and management from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. Richard A. Conway (NAE) retired from Union Carbide Corporation as a senior corporate fellow. His areas of expertise include industrial ecology, petrochemical wastewater treatment, hazardous and solid waste management, environmental risk analysis of chemical products, and site restoration and remediation. Mr. Conway's work has encompassed research planning and evaluation and policy and regulation development. He has served on multiple NRC commissions, committees, panels, and boards and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1986. Mr. Conway has also served on science advisory boards for the Environmental Protection Agency and Department of Defense and received career recognition awards from the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry and the American Academy of Environmental Engineers. He received a B.S. in public health in 1953 from the University of Massachusetts and an M.S. in sanitary engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1957. John W. Day is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science at Louisiana State University and is a leading expert on wetland ecology, wetland-river interactions and water quality, coastal zone ecology, and ecological modeling. Some of his current research projects include utilizing Mississippi River diversions for nutrient management in a Louisiana coastal watershed, mitigating non-point source pollution in urban

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60 CLEANER and NSF's Environmental Observatories watersheds, and developing nutrient standards for Louisiana waters. Dr. Day is Chair of the National Technical Review Committee that oversees and reviews the Louisiana Coastal Area Project to restore the Mississippi Delta. He has a B.A. and M.S. in zoology from LSU and a Ph.D. in marine and environmental sciences from the University of North Carolina. Charles T. Driscoll is University Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Syracuse University where he also serves as the director of the Center for Environmental Systems Engineering. His teaching and research interests are in the area of environmental chemistry, biogeochemistry, and environmental quality modeling. A principal research focus has been the response of forest, aquatic, and coastal ecosystems to disturbance, including air pollution, land use change, and elevated inputs of nutrients and mercury. Dr. Driscoll is currently the principal investigator of the National Science Foundation's LTER project at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. He received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Maine and his M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University. Tony R. Fountain is director of the Cyberinfrastructure Laboratory for Environmental Observing Systems (CLEOS) at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) of the University of California, San Diego. SDSC serves as an international resource for data cyberinfrastructure and focuses on data-oriented and computational science and engineering applications. Dr. Fountain's group is involved in a number of sensornet and observation system projects that aim to address the issue of sensor network management and data accessibility. His research focuses on data mining, machine learning, and computational infrastructure for a variety of science and engineering applications. Of particular interest are applications in ecology and environmental science involving sensor networks, complex data analysis, and real-time decision support. Dr. Fountain is a member of the National Ecological Observatory Network's (NEON) Facilities and Infrastructure Committee and advises the development of NEON's communication and information technology. He holds a B.S. in cognitive psychology and statistics and a B.S. in computer science and mathematics from North Arizona University. Dr. Fountain received his M.S. and Ph.D. in computer science from Oregon State University. Edwin E. Herricks is professor of ecological engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. His areas of expertise include aquatic ecology and stream ecosystem and watershed management. Dr. Herrick's current research includes evaluation the effect of climate change scenarios on fisheries; restoration of streams in urban areas, including the development of ecological engineering concepts for watershed management; and development of an integrated hydrologic, geomorphic, and ecological classification system for watershed

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Appendix B 61 management. He has served on several NRC committees addressing issues such as endangered species in the Platte River, the legacy of radiation problems at Hanford, WA, and management of the Upper Mississippi River Navigation Project. Dr. Herricks has written numerous articles and papers on the broad theme of improving engineering design and environmental decision making. He holds a B.A. in zoology and English from the University of Kansas, an M.S. in sanitary/environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Robert J. Huggett recently retired as Professor of Zoology and Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies at Michigan State University. He also is Professor Emeritus of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary. Dr. Huggett's aquatic biogeochemistry research has involved the fate and effects of hazardous substances in aquatic systems with a focus on hydrophobic chemicals and their partitioning between sediment and pore water. From 1994 to 1997, Dr. Huggett was the Assistant Administrator for Research and Development for the United States Environmental Protection Agency. He has served on many NRC committees, is a past member of the WSTB, and a current member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Huggett has an M.S. degree in marine chemistry from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a Ph.D. in marine science from the College of William and Mary. Timothy K. Kratz is the director of the Trout Lake Station at the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin. His research focuses on the long- term, regional ecology of lakes; carbon dynamics in lakes; lake metabolism; and the formation and ecology of kettle-hole peatlands. Dr. Kratz is a principle investigator for the North Temperate Lakes LTER and has served on the LTER's Executive Committee. He has participated on the NRC's Committee to Assess EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Project and the Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research. Dr. Kratz earned his B.S. in botany from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, his M.S. in ecology and behavioral biology from the University of Minnesota, and his Ph.D. in botany from the University of Wisconsin. Jeffrey M. Lauria is a vice president of Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., a century-old New York-based firm of civil and environmental engineers and scientists specializing in water issues. As National Director of Water Resources, Dr. Lauria directs large-scale program management and engineering master plans for wastewater, wet weather, watershed, and water quality projects. He also has comprehensive national and international experience in wastewater, drinking water, and stormwater treatment processes and related expertise in hydraulic, hydrologic, water quality, and mathematical modeling to support decision optimization at more than 200 project locations. Dr. Lauria has also served as a technical adviser to several state and local governments and on scientific and managerial councils from the private sector. He recently served on the NRC's

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62 CLEANER and NSF's Environmental Observatories Committee on Water Quality Improvement for the Pittsburgh Region. Dr. Lauria received a B.E. in civil engineering from Manhattan College, and an M.E. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Manhattan College and Polytechnic University, respectively. Judith L. Meyer is Distinguished Research Professor at the University of Georgia's Institute of Ecology. Her expertise is in river and stream ecosystems with emphasis on nutrient dynamics, microbial food webs, riparian zones, ecosystem management, river restoration, and urban rivers. Dr. Meyer is a past member of the WSTB, a current member of the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, and has served on multiple NRC committees. She currently serves on the Environmental Processes and Effects Committee of the EPA's Science Advisory Board and on the Independent Science Board of the California Bay Delta Authority. Dr. Meyer also chairs the Scientific and Technical Advisory Committees and is on the Board of Directors of American Rivers and Upper Chattahoochee Riverkeeper. She received a Ph.D. in 1978 from Cornell University. Tavit O. Najarian is president of Najarian Associates, a civil engineering and environmental consulting firm. Dr. Najarian is an expert in the field of water resources. Over the past 25 years, he has been involved with the development, adaptation, and application of mathematical models for hydrodynamic and water quality simulations of aquatic systems. Dr. Najarian has particular expertise in applying such models in studies of wasteload allocation and regional planning of stormwater runoff and estuarine eutrophication dynamics. He also serves as a consultant on hydraulic and environmental issues related to large-scale planned residential, commercial, industrial, and waterfront projects. Dr. Najarian earned his B.C.E. from American University in Beirut, Lebanon, his M.S. in civil engineering from Northeastern University, and his Sc.D. in hydrodynamics and water resources from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Charles R. O'Melia (NAE) is the Abel Wolman Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. His professional experience includes positions at Hazen & Sawyer Engineers, University of Michigan, Georgia Institute of Technology, Harvard University, and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His research interests are in aquatic chemistry, environmental fate and transport, predictive modeling of natural systems, and the theory of water and wastewater treatment. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and past member of the Water Science and Technology Board and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Committee on Research Opportunities and Priorities for EPA, the Committee on Wastewater Management for Coastal Urban Areas, and the Committee on Water-Treatment Chemicals, and he was chair of the Committee to Review the New York City

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Appendix B 63 Watershed Management Strategy. He received a B.C.E. from Manhattan College and an M.S.E. and Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Michigan.

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