Appendixes



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Critical Technology Accessibility Appendixes

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Critical Technology Accessibility This page intentionally left blank.

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Critical Technology Accessibility Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Robert J. Hermann, Chair, is a senior partner, Global Technology Partners, LLC. He is a former director of the Department of Defense’s National Reconnaissance Office and a former senior official at the National Security Agency. Dr. Hermann served as a member of the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board during the Clinton administration (1993-1995). In 1998, Dr. Hermann retired from United Technologies Corporation (UTC), where he held the position of senior vice president, science and technology. In that role, he was responsible for assuring development of the company’s technical resources and the full exploitation of science and technology by the corporation. He was also responsible for the United Technologies Research Center. Dr. Hermann joined the company in 1982 as vice president, systems technology, in the electronics sector and later served in a series of assignments in the defense and space systems groups. Dr. Hermann concluded his tenure as immediate past chairman of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) board of directors at the end of 2002 following a 3-year term; he had served as chairman of the ANSI board of directors during 1998 and 2000 and was a member of the ANSI board since 1993. Dr. Hermann continues to serve as a senior partner of Global Technology Partners, LLC, which specializes in investments in technology, defense, aerospace, and related businesses worldwide. Before joining UTC, he served 20 years with the National Security Agency with assignments in research and development, operations, and NATO. In 1977, he was appointed principal deputy assistant secretary of

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Critical Technology Accessibility defense for communications, command, control, and intelligence. In 1979, he was named assistant secretary of the Air Force for research, development, and logistics and in parallel was director of the National Reconnaissance Office. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Iowa State University and has expertise in defense acquisition/source selection and export control and commerce for the intelligence community. Pierre A. Chao is a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS). Before joining CSIS, Mr. Chao was a managing director and senior aerospace/defense analyst at Credit Suisse First Boston (CSFB) from 1999 to 2003, where he was responsible for following the U.S. and global aerospace/defense industry. He remains a CSFB senior adviser. Prior to joining CFSB, Mr. Chao was the senior aerospace/defense analyst at Morgan Stanley Dean Witter from 1995 to 1999. He served as the senior industry analyst at Smith Barney during 1994 and as a director at JSA International, a Boston- and Paris-based management consulting firm that focused on the aerospace/defense industry (1986-1988, 1990-1993). Mr. Chao was also a cofounder of JSA Research, an equity research boutique specializing in the aerospace/defense industry. Before signing on with JSA, he worked in the New York and London offices of Prudential-Bache Capital Funding as a mergers and acquisitions banker focusing on aerospace/defense (1988-1990). Mr. Chao garnered numerous awards while working on Wall Street. Institutional Investor ranked his team the number one global aerospace/defense group in 2000-2002, and he was on the Institutional Investor All-America Research Team every year eligible from 1996 to 2002. He was ranked the number one aerospace/defense analyst by corporations in the 1998-2000 Reuters polls, the number one aerospace/defense analyst in the 1995-1999 Greenwich Associates polls, and appeared on the Wall Street Journal All-Star list in 4 of 7 eligible years. In 2000, Mr. Chao was appointed to the Presidential Commission on Offsets in International Trade. He is also a guest lecturer at the National Defense University and the Defense Acquisition University. Mr. Chao has been sought out as an expert analyst of the defense and aerospace industry by the Senate Armed Services Committee, the House Science Committee, the Office of the Secretary of Defense, DoD’s Defense Science Board, the Army Science Board, NASA, DGA (France), NATO, and the Aerospace Industries Association board of governors. Mr. Chao earned dual bachelor of science degrees in political science and management science from MIT. His expertise is in

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Critical Technology Accessibility defense acquisition/source selection, defense economics, export control/commerce, global supply, defense industrial issues, global defense industry, and finance/economics. Anthony J. DeMaria is chief scientist at Coherent-DEOS LLC and professor in residence at the University of Connecticut School of Engineering. He was chairman/CEO and founder of DeMaria ElectroOptics Systems, Inc. (1994-2001). He held several positions at the United Technology Research Center before he retired as assistant director of research for electronics and photonics technology. Dr. DeMaria’s research expertise is in the area of utilization of laser devices; the interaction of elastic waves with coherent light radiation; the generation, measurement, and application of picosecond light pulses; gas laser research and applications; acoustic-optics; laser physics and devices; and optics. Dr. DeMaria has been an adjunct professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a consultant to government and industry, editor of the Journal of Quantum Electronics, and a member of government and industry advisory boards. He was the Distinguished Fairchild Scholar at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. DeMaria is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering and was president of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering (1997-2003). He was a research professor in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Connecticut (1994-1998). Dr. DeMaria’s expertise is in export controls and commerce, industrial engineering, and lasers/optics/photonics. Edsel D. Dunford had a 35-year career in the aerospace industry at Boeing, Ford Aerospace, and TRW. He retired as president of TRW Inc. with responsibility for its aerospace, automotive, and credit reporting businesses. He participated in the design and development of space systems, from early planetary explorers to the sophisticated communication, surveillance, and intelligence systems of the cold war. Mr. Dunford served on several corporate boards including those of TRW Inc., Cordant Technologies, Howmet International, National Steel Corporation, and Cooper Tire and Rubber. Professional societies include the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and the National Academy of Engineering. He chaired the NRC Committee on the National Aerospace Initiative in 2003. Mr. Dunford holds a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, an M.S. in engineering from UCLA, and attended the Executive Program at Stanford University. He served in the U.S. Army from 1954 to

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Critical Technology Accessibility 1956. Mr. Dunford has expertise in the intelligence community and in military satellites for intelligence, surveillance, and communications. Christopher C. Green is currently executive director of the Emergent Technologies Research Division at Detroit Medical Center (DMC), Wayne State School of Medicine. He is also a fellow in neuroimaging and an assistant professor in the Department of Radiology and the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences. He is chairman of the Independent Science Panel Office and undersecretary of operations research and is a member of the Medical Subcommittee, Local Emergency Planning Committee, State of Michigan/Detroit Regional Homeland Defense; the board of the Spinal Injury Recovery Center at DMC/RIM; and the SOM MRI planning and review board. Before his current position, he was at the same time executive director for global emerging technology policy in General Motors’ (GM’s) Public Policy Center and chief technology officer and executive director of Regional Science and Technology for GM’s Asia-Pacific operations. He managed formulation of corporate policy directives in newly emergent issues of driver distraction and global privacy. He championed Asia-Pacific regional operations for health and safety and industrial medicine and numerous occupational medical research programs. He began a distinguished career with the CIA in 1978 as a senior division analyst in the Office of Scientific and Weapons Intelligence. In this role he had multidisciplinary research and management experience in medicine, comparative biology, bioengineering, animal and human physiology, endocrinology, and the life sciences. Special areas of management experience included the direction of research of doctoral-level and physician scientists in the above areas as well as participation as senior analyst. His specialty is forensic medicine and toxicology, and his doctoral research work in neurophysiology concerned the biochemical functioning of the human brain. Dr. Green was an analyst with the Life Sciences Division, chief of the Biomedical Sciences Branch/LSD, and deputy division chief. He became a senior division analyst with the newly formed Office of Scientific and Weapons Intelligence in 1978. He received a bachelor’s degree from Northwestern University, a Ph.D. in neurophysiology from the University of Colorado Medical School, and an M.D. from the Autonomous City University in El Paso, Texas/Monterey, Mexico. Dr. Green’s relevant expertise is in global supply, the intelligence community, and biotechnology.

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Critical Technology Accessibility Joseph Grosson is executive director for Lockheed Martin Focused Logistics and corporate director of logistics at the Lockheed Martin Corporation. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, Mr. Grosson served as vice president of the Engineering Systems Group for DynCorp, providing engineering and logistics support services for all DoD components, including supply chain management advanced solutions. In addition, he was the past president of PRC Engineering Systems, vice president for program development for Advanced Technology, Inc., and vice president for program management and business development at VSE Corporation. He was a naval reserve officer for 13 years, which included being involved in the following programs: Military Sea Transportation Service, Office of Naval Material, and Weapons Training Units. Mr. Grosson served in many capacities in the government sector, including as a civilian employee of the Department of the Navy and a member of the Senior Executive Service. Additionally, he was a recipient of the Navy Superior Civilian Service Award. He has administered the research and development program for the nuclear power element of the Navy’s Exploratory Development Program, as well as other technology related to conventional shipboard power plant design. Mr. Grosson received his bachelor’s degree in marine engineering from the State University of New York Maritime College and a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from Catholic University of America. His relevant expertise is in defense acquisition/source selection, global supply, logistics, total sustainment solutions (design to disposal), autonomic logistics systems (onboard diagnostics, prognostics, IT infrastructure, supply chain management, and sense and respond technologies), semantic web and logistic ontologies, design for sustainment, and critical service/infrastructure. Alfonso Velosa III is research director for semiconductors at Gartner, Inc. In this position, he manages research on semiconductor unit forecasts and trends, with a particular focus on global manufacturing and semiconductor consumption trends. Previously at Gartner, he was a management consultant leading a variety of custom market strategy projects in the semiconductor, manufacturing, and software arenas. His experience covers a broad range of topics in the technology marketplace, including strategic planning, project and program management, supply chain management, contract negotiations, financial analysis, and product management support. Prior to joining Gartner, Mr. Velosa managed Intel’s motherboard and server supply chain for application-specific integrated circuits, from con-

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Critical Technology Accessibility cept through production. In addition, he managed the supply chain and negotiated overall relationships and terms with suppliers. He also provided project and program management services to NASA in Washington, D.C., and in Cleveland, culminating in the management of a semiconductor diffusion project that flew on the space shuttle in 1997. He holds a B.S. in materials science engineering from Columbia University, an M.S. in materials science engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a master’s degree in international management from Thunderbird. He is a member of the NRC Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Mr. Velosa’s expertise is in critical technology infrastructure, global supply, logistics, the semiconductor industry and the semiconductor value chain, electronic manufacturing services, and supply chain management.