H
Biographies of Committee and Panel Members

STEERING COMMITTEE


PAUL G. KAMINSKI (NAE), Chair, is the chairman and chief executive officer of Technovation, Inc., as well as a senior partner in Global Technology Partners. Dr. Kaminski previously served at DoD as the under secretary of defense for acquisition and technology. His government experience also includes a 20-year career as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, where he directed major development programs, including advanced reconnaissance systems and the stealth program. Dr. Kaminski is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and a senior fellow and past chairman of the Defense Science Board. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University, a B.S. from the Air Force Academy, and M.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT).


WILLIAM W. HOOVER, Vice Chair, is currently a consultant for aviation, defense, and energy matters. He is the former executive vice president of the Air Transport Association of America, where he represented the interests of major U.S. airlines, particularly as they relate to technical, safety, and security issues. Before that, he served as the assistant secretary, defense programs, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), where he was responsible for all aspects of the U.S. nuclear weapons development program. He is also a major general, U.S. Air Force (retired), and had responsible positions in the Air Force Space Program, within NATO, at the Pentagon with the secretary of the Air Force, and in Vietnam, where he commanded a combat air wing and flew 97 missions as a fighter pilot. He has served as chairman of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council and as a member of the NASA Advisory Council. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and is a distinguished graduate of the National War College and a lifetime national associate of the National Academies.


INDERJIT CHOPRA is the Alfred Gessow Professor in Aerospace Engineering and director of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center at the University of Maryland (UM), where he acted as department chair from 1988 to 1990 and was the Minta Martin Research Professor from 1996 to 2000. He has been working on various fundamental problems related to the aeromechanics of helicopters, including aeromechanical stability, active vibration control, modeling of composite blades, rotor head health monitoring, aeroelastic optimization, smart structures, micro air vehicles, and comprehensive aeromechanics analyses of bearingless, tilt-rotor, servoflap, compound, teetering, and circulation control rotors. He has been the principal investigator of four major Army research programs: a university research initiative on smart structures technology; a multidisciplinary university research initiative (MURI) on innovative smart technologies for and actively controlled rotorcraft that rides as smoothly as a jet; the Rotary-Wing Center of Excellence (cosponsored by NASA); and a MURI on micro hovering air vehicles. An author of 150 archival journal papers and 234 conference proceedings papers, Dr. Chopra has been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Helicopter Society, the AIAA Journal of Aircraft, and the Journal of Intelligent Materials and Systems and has served on the editorial advisory boards of VERTICA, Smart Materials and Structures, SADHANA, and Journal of Aircraft. He received UM’s Distinguished Research Professorship in 1992, UM’s Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Schools in 1995, the AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Award in 2002, the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Grover E. Bell Award in 2002, the American Society of Mechanical



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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future H Biographies of Committee and Panel Members STEERING COMMITTEE PAUL G. KAMINSKI (NAE), Chair, is the chairman and chief executive officer of Technovation, Inc., as well as a senior partner in Global Technology Partners. Dr. Kaminski previously served at DoD as the under secretary of defense for acquisition and technology. His government experience also includes a 20-year career as an officer in the U.S. Air Force, where he directed major development programs, including advanced reconnaissance systems and the stealth program. Dr. Kaminski is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), a fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), and a senior fellow and past chairman of the Defense Science Board. He received a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University, a B.S. from the Air Force Academy, and M.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT). WILLIAM W. HOOVER, Vice Chair, is currently a consultant for aviation, defense, and energy matters. He is the former executive vice president of the Air Transport Association of America, where he represented the interests of major U.S. airlines, particularly as they relate to technical, safety, and security issues. Before that, he served as the assistant secretary, defense programs, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), where he was responsible for all aspects of the U.S. nuclear weapons development program. He is also a major general, U.S. Air Force (retired), and had responsible positions in the Air Force Space Program, within NATO, at the Pentagon with the secretary of the Air Force, and in Vietnam, where he commanded a combat air wing and flew 97 missions as a fighter pilot. He has served as chairman of the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council and as a member of the NASA Advisory Council. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and is a distinguished graduate of the National War College and a lifetime national associate of the National Academies. INDERJIT CHOPRA is the Alfred Gessow Professor in Aerospace Engineering and director of the Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center at the University of Maryland (UM), where he acted as department chair from 1988 to 1990 and was the Minta Martin Research Professor from 1996 to 2000. He has been working on various fundamental problems related to the aeromechanics of helicopters, including aeromechanical stability, active vibration control, modeling of composite blades, rotor head health monitoring, aeroelastic optimization, smart structures, micro air vehicles, and comprehensive aeromechanics analyses of bearingless, tilt-rotor, servoflap, compound, teetering, and circulation control rotors. He has been the principal investigator of four major Army research programs: a university research initiative on smart structures technology; a multidisciplinary university research initiative (MURI) on innovative smart technologies for and actively controlled rotorcraft that rides as smoothly as a jet; the Rotary-Wing Center of Excellence (cosponsored by NASA); and a MURI on micro hovering air vehicles. An author of 150 archival journal papers and 234 conference proceedings papers, Dr. Chopra has been an associate editor of the Journal of the American Helicopter Society, the AIAA Journal of Aircraft, and the Journal of Intelligent Materials and Systems and has served on the editorial advisory boards of VERTICA, Smart Materials and Structures, SADHANA, and Journal of Aircraft. He received UM’s Distinguished Research Professorship in 1992, UM’s Presidential Award for Outstanding Service to the Schools in 1995, the AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Award in 2002, the American Helicopter Society (AHS) Grover E. Bell Award in 2002, the American Society of Mechanical

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future Engineers (ASME) Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Prize in 2001, the A.J. Clark School of Engineering Faculty Outstanding Research Award in 2002, and the SPIE Smart Structures and Materials Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004. He has been a member of the Army Science Board. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), a fellow of the American Helicopter Society (AHS), a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), a fellow of the Aeronautical Society of India (ASI), and a fellow of the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA). He received his Sc.D. from MIT. EUGENE E. COVERT (NAE) is the T. Wilson Professor of Aeronautics, emeritus, at MIT. His long and distinguished career in aerospace has spanned over 60 years in academia and has included additional stints as chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force, member and chairman of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, chairman of the Power and Propulsion panel of NATO’s Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development, director of the Wright Brothers Facility, and chairman of the ASEB. Dr. Covert’s experience provides an important perspective on trends in aeronautical research and development, particularly with regard to propulsion. ALAN C. ECKBRETH is a private consultant who also serves as the vice president/president-elect of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering (CASE). He has extensive industrial experience in complex reacting flows and previous service to NRC/Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) panels and many other government committees. In 2004, he chaired the NRC review panel for NASA’s Intelligent Propulsion Systems Foundation Technologies. Dr. Eckbreth earned his doctorate in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University in 1968. He also holds an M.S. in administrative sciences from Rensselaer. After leaving Princeton, he joined United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and spent 34 years there in both technical research and senior management positions. Initially, he was engaged in research into the properties of high-power electric-discharge CO2 convection lasers, but the bulk of his career was spent in developing and applying spatially precise laser techniques for gas dynamic and combustion diagnostic purposes, most notably coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. His senior management positions at UTRC included director, Fuel Cells Program; director, Aeromechanical, Chemical, and Fluid Systems Program; and director, Pratt & Whitney Program. Dr. Eckbreth is the author of over 60 technical papers and a book on laser diagnostics and has lectured widely on the subject. He is a fellow of the AIAA and of the Optical Society of America (OSA). He served on the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board from 1995 to 1999 and on numerous other technical advisory panels to NASA and DoD. In 1985, he received the George Mead Medal from United Technologies Corporation for outstanding engineering achievement. After retiring from UTRC and prior to entering consulting, he held the position of vice president and dean, Rensselaer at Hartford, a branch campus of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), and was also professor of mechanical engineering in the Department of Engineering and Science. THOMAS M. HARTMANN is a program manager within the Advanced Development Programs (Skunk Works) organization of Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. His primary responsibility is for the quiet supersonic transport (QSST) program and related technology initiatives. He joined Lockheed-California Company as a propulsion engineer in 1980. He has worked on the earliest stages of what is now the F/A-22 Raptor, assuming roles of increasing technical responsibility. In 1992, he was instrumental in the capture of a classified program and transitioned into project management. He has managed several technology and development programs within the Skunk Works. Mr. Hartmann received a B.S. from the University of California, Davis in 1980, with a double major in aeronautical and mechanical engineering. He received an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Southern California in 1984. He has attended several management, executive, and program management development programs within Lockheed Martin and at Defense Acquisition University. In 2002 he was recognized by Lockheed Martin with its NOVA award, the corporation’s highest employee recognition award. He holds several U.S. patents related to sonic-boom mitigation technologies and their application to supersonic business jets. ILAN KROO (NAE) is a professor in Stanford University’s Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He received his B.S. in physics from Stanford in 1978 and then continued studies at Stanford in aeronautics, receiving a Ph.D. in 1983. He worked in the Advanced Aerodynamic Concepts Branch at NASA Ames Research Center for 4 years before returning to Stanford as a member of the aero/astro faculty. Dr. Kroo’s research in aerodynamics and multidisciplinary design optimization includes the study of innovative airplane concepts. He has participated in the design of commercial aircraft, UAVs, sailplanes, America’s Cup sailboats, and supersonic aircraft. Dr. Kroo, a member of ASEB, has served as a member of the NRC Committee on Review of the Effectiveness of Air Force Science and Technology Program Changes, the NRC Committee on Breakthrough Technology for Commercial Supersonic Aircraft, and the Committee for Materials, Structures, and Aeronautics for Advanced Uninhabited Air Vehicles. In addition to his research and teaching interests, Dr. Kroo is chief scientist of Desktop Aeronautics, Inc., a software and consulting company. NANCY G. LEVESON (NAE) is professor of aeronautics and astronautics and professor of engineering systems at MIT. Dr. Leveson conducts research on system safety, soft-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future ware engineering, system engineering, and human–computer interaction. In 1999, she received the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM’s) Allen Newell Award for outstanding computer science research and in 1995 the AIAA Information Systems Award for “developing the field of software safety and for promoting responsible software and system engineering practices where life and property are at stake.” This year she received the ACM Sigsoft Outstanding Research Award. She has published over 200 research papers and is author of a book, Safeware: System Safety and Computers, published by Addison-Wesley. She has served on numerous National Academies committees. IVETT A. LEYVA is a senior aerodynamicist at Microcosm, Inc., where she is responsible for the development of ablative chambers and also performs CFD simulations of Microcosm’s launch vehicles’ external aerodynamics. She recently led a testing campaign for a 20k-lbf thrust engine for Microcosm’s small launch vehicle for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA’s) FALCON program. Dr. Leyva worked at the General Electric Global Research Center from 1999 to 2003. There, she worked on pulse detonation engines and led the design, fabrication, and testing of a pulse detonation engine concept at the component and system level. She also initiated and coordinated different research projects with scientists from the former Soviet Union. She has four granted U.S. patents in the area of combustion and four more filed (three of those are also filed in the European Union, Japan, or Canada). Dr. Leyva also worked as a thermal engineer for Exponent, where she investigated the cause, origin, and prevention of aviation accidents as well as fires and explosions on scales ranging from the residential to the industrial. Dr. Leyva graduated from Caltech with a Ph.D. in aeronautics. Her dissertation was a numerical and experimental study on the shock detachment process on cones in hypervelocity flows. Dr. Leyva has been part of several NRC committees for propulsion. AMY PRITCHETT is the David D. Lewis Associate Professor of Cognitive Engineering in the School of Aerospace Engineering and a joint associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research encompasses human– automation interaction, including advanced decision aids; procedure design as a mechanism to define and test the operation of complex, multiagent systems (e.g., air traffic control, spacecraft mission control); and simulation of complex systems to assess changes in emergent system behavior in response to implementation of new information technology. She is on the editorial board of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, an area editor of Transactions of the Society for Computer Simulations, and associate editor of the AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information and Communication. Her awards include the Jackson Award of the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) for contribution to aviation. She previously served on the NRC Committee for Vision 2050 and the NRC committee reviewing the NGATS JPDO plan, where she contributed to the committee’s investigation of system modeling and human factors. Dr. Pritchett is currently a member of ASEB. EDMOND L. SOLIDAY was employed by United Airlines for over 35 years as a pilot, human factors instructor, flight manager, and staff executive, serving the last 11 as vice president for safety, quality assurance, and security. He has served on numerous aviation safety-related advisory boards and commissions, and he chaired the Commercial Aviation Safety Team, the Air Transport Association’s (ATA’s) Safety Council, the Star Alliance Safety Committee, and the ATA Environmental Committee. Captain Soliday currently serves on the board of governors for the Flight Safety Foundation and on the board for the MIT’s Global Airline Industry Program Advisory Group. Among his awards are the Bendix Trophy, the Vanguard Trophy, and the Laura Tabor Barbour International Air Safety Award. Captain Soliday previously served on four NRC study groups. JOHN VALASEK is director, Flight Simulation Laboratory, and associate professor of aerospace engineering at Texas A&M University. He has been actively conducting flight controls research and configuration design of manned and unmanned air vehicles in both industry and academia for 20 years. His research interests include autonomous intelligent control of unmanned air and ground vehicles, autonomous air refueling, vision-based navigation systems, intelligent cockpit computing and displays, and morphing air vehicles. In industry, he was a flight control engineer for Northrop Corporation’s Aircraft Division, where he worked on integrated flight and propulsion control systems in the Flight Controls Research Group and on the AGM-137 tri-services standoff attack missile (TSSAM) in the Flight Controls Analysis Group, where he received the Northrop Corporation Outstanding Contribution to Program Award. He has been an AFOSR summer faculty research fellow for the Flight Dynamics Directorate at Wright Laboratories and a NASA summer faculty researcher in the Guidance and Control Branch at NASA Langley. In addition to university research, he is a consultant on flight control to several companies. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and a senior member of the IEEE, as well as a chair or member of numerous AIAA and IEEE technical committees. He is a reviewer for the NRC and the AFOSR and a former associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Education. He earned a B.S. at California State Polytechnic University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Kansas, all in aerospace engineering. DAVID VAN WIE is an aerospace engineer in aerospace vehicle design and development, with emphasis on propulsion systems and advanced aerodynamics for supersonic and hy-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future personic flight vehicles. He has been with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory since 1983 and is currently a member of the principal professional staff and director of the Precision Engagement Transformation Center. Dr. Van Wie also holds appointments as research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University and lecturer in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at UM. Dr. Van Wie attended the UM between 1976 and 1986 and received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering. He was also awarded an M.S. in electrical engineering from Johns Hopkins University in 1998. He was awarded the Gene Zara Award for outstanding contributions to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program in 1989 and 1992. Dr. Van Wie was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board’s (SAB’s) Committee on Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles (1991), of the NRC Committee on the Assessment of the Air Force Hypersonic Technology Program (1987), and SAB 2000 summer study on Air Force hypersonics. ROBERT WHITEHEAD entered government service in 1971 after receiving undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and completing a 1-year postdoctoral associateship at the NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Whitehead began his career with the Department of Navy as a research engineer in the Aviation Department of the David Taylor Naval Ship R&D Center at Carderock. He transferred to the Office of Naval Research (ONR) in 1976 as a scientific officer in applied aerodynamics, managing university and industry research projects. For the next 13 years Dr. White-head held a number of positions at ONR, finally as director in the Mechanics Division from 1986 until 1989, when he transferred to NASA Headquarters. Dr. Whitehead began at NASA in the Office of Aeronautics as the assistant director for aeronautics (rotorcraft). He held a variety of other positions, including director of the Subsonic Transportation Division, before becoming the deputy associate administrator for aeronautics in 1994. Dr. Whitehead became associate administrator for aeronautics in 1995 and associate administrator for aeronautics and space transportation technology in 1997. Dr. Whitehead retired from federal service in December 1997. He consulted part-time in the aerospace community and its professional associations, on both a volunteer and a paid basis, until becoming interim president and executive director of the NIA in 2002. With the appointment of a permanent NIA president in October 2003, Dr. Whitehead became NIA vice president for Research and Program Development until June 2004. He currently is a consultant on special projects to NIA. DIANNE S. WILEY is a Boeing Technical Fellow for Airframe Technology Integration. She serves as the enterprise liaison to the Boeing Technical Fellowship to facilitate technology maturation and technology transition to the space exploration systems business area. In her prior assignment with the Boeing Phantom Works, she was the program manager for airframe technology on the NASA Space Launch Initiative Program, overseeing the development and demonstration of advanced structure and materials technology for next-generation, reusable launch vehicles. Previously, she was with Northrop Grumman for 20 years, where she had been manager of airframe technology. In that position, Dr. Wiley was responsible for research and development and technology transition in structural design and analysis, materials and processes, and manufacturing technology. Dr. Wiley was responsible for developing and implementing innovative structural solutions to ensure the structural integrity of the B-2 aircraft. Dr. Wiley’s 25 years of technical experience have involved durability and damage tolerance, advanced composites (organic and ceramic), high-temperature structures, smart structures, low-observable structures, systems engineering, and rapid prototyping. Dr. Wiley holds a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from the University of California-Los Angeles School of Engineering and Applied Science. She attended Defense Systems Management College (1996). She is a graduate of the Center for Creative Leadership (1995), Leadership California Class of 1998, and the Boeing Leadership Center (2002.) PANEL A: AERODYNAMICS AND ACOUSTICS DAVID VAN WIE, Panel Chair (see biography above). PAUL BEVILAQUA (NAE) is manager of advanced programs at the Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company. He joined Lockheed Martin as chief aeronautical scientist of the Lockheed Advanced Aeronautics Company and became chief engineer of advanced development projects in the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works. During this time he played a leading role in creating the Joint Strike Fighter Program and invented the lift fan propulsion system that makes it possible to build variants of a single stealthy, supersonic V/STOL aircraft for the Air Force, Marines, and Navy. Prior to joining Lockheed Martin, he was manager of advanced programs at Rockwell International’s Navy aircraft plant. He began his career as a captain in the U.S. Air Force and deputy director of the Energy Conversion Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. Dr. Bevilaqua is a member of the NAE and a fellow of the AIAA. He is the recipient of an Air Force Scientific Achievement Award for his contributions to turbulence theory, the AIAA Newbold award for his contributions to V/STOL aircraft technology, the AIAA and SAE aircraft design awards for his contributions to aircraft design, and the Collier Trophy for his lift fan propulsion system. His publications include articles in the Journal of the AIAA, the Journal of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and the proceedings of many meetings and symposia.

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future CHARLES BOCCADORO is business area director for Future Strike Systems in the Integrated Systems Western Region, Northrop Grumman, in El Segundo, California. This business area focuses on defining next-generation global attack capability for the Air Force, which currently comprises all Air Force next-generation bomber and related technology studies. His team conducted the DARPA Quiet Supersonic Platform study and shaped sonic boom flight demonstration efforts, which received a 2004 NASA Turning Goals Into Reality Award. His team leads Northrop Grumman’s Air Force Next Generation, Long-Range Strike Phase II and Phase III study activities. Previously, he was manager of the aerosciences technology and propulsion advanced design organizations. He has worked for Northrop Grumman since 1980 supporting several air vehicle development programs, including F/A-18E/F, YF-23, and B-2. He is a graduate of MIT and the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics and is an associate fellow of AIAA. He is a patent holder, the recipient of a 2003 Aviation Week Laurel, the 2004 AIAA Aircraft Design Award, and the 2005 NASA Vehicle Systems Award. THOMAS CORKE is the Clark Chair Professor in the Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Notre Dame. He is also the founding director of the Center for Flow Physics and Control (FlowPAC) and the director of the Hessert Laboratory for Aerospace Research. Dr. Corke is internationally recognized for his research in the areas of fluid instabilities and transition to turbulence, control of turbulent boundary layers, flow visualization techniques, and flow control. He has extensive experimental experience over the full range of Mach numbers, from incompressible to hypersonic flows, in a large number of flow fields, including boundary layers, wakes, and jets. His research also involves computational fluid dynamics especially with regard to acoustic receptivity and plasma actuators. His Ph.D. work on the control of large-scale turbulence in boundary layers for drag reduction led to his receiving a NASA Langley Achievement Award in 1982. He was the first to introduce controlled three-dimensional disturbances to verify subharmonic resonance mechanisms in boundary layers, which was recognized with a NASA Langley Achievement Award in 1995. He was named an associate fellow in AIAA the same year. Dr. Corke wrote the textbook Design of Aircraft (Prentice-Hall, 2002), which has to date been adopted by approximately 12 aerospace engineering departments for their capstone design course. He was named a fellow of ASME in 2005. ILAN KROO (NAE) (see biography above). ROBERT LIEBECK (NAE) is currently manager of the Blended-Wing-Body Program at Boeing. In his 44 years at Boeing, he has served as program manager on several classified advanced-concept airplane programs, some of which culminated in successful flight vehicles. He has an extensive list of technical publications, and his airfoil work is discussed in several textbooks on aerodynamics. He is also professor of the practice of aeronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and adjunct professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California, Irvine, where he teaches aerodynamics, flight mechanics, and airplane design. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautical engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana Champaign and received the university’s College of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1996. As a consultant, he designed the wings for racing cars that have won the Indianapolis 500 and Formula 1 races, the keel section for the America3 yacht that won the America’s Cup in 1992, and the wing for a World Aerobatic Championship airplane. Dr. Liebeck is a Boeing Senior Technical Fellow, an AIAA fellow, a recipient of the AIAA Aerodynamics Award, a recipient of the AIAA Aircraft Design Award, a recipient of the AIAA Wright Brothers Lectureship in Aeronautics, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, a recipient of the ASME Spirit of St. Louis Medal, and a member of the NAE. DAN MARREN is the chief of the Hypersonics Systems Division at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC). He also serves as the Air Force site director for the AEDC White Oak site in Silver Spring, Maryland, home to the Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. His experience includes technical leadership on over 30 projects relating to advanced hypersonic research and development in the Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9 as well as several supersonic projects in Navy supersonic facilities. He had the primary role in the conception, design, and development of a major new facility at White Oak and participated in every other important upgrade to the facility. In his previous experience as ground test coordinator for the Navy reentry special projects office, he managed the ground test program for several Navy programs from the advanced project office. He has chaired panels, studies, and focus groups, providing input as a subject matter expert in hypersonics, and maintains technical positions in the AIAA and the Supersonic Tunnel Association International (STAI). He has designed and taught several short courses on physics, testing, and hypersonics for various audiences, including universities, professional societies, and education and public outreach for younger students. Mr. Marren earned his B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Cincinnati and his M.S. in engineering management, specializing in high-temperature gas dynamics, at the University of Maryland. STEPHEN RUFFIN is an associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and head of its Aerothermodynamics Research and Technology Laboratory. He leads the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research thrust and collaborates in its inte-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future gration with the systems analysis tool and with the aeroelastic analysis. Dr. Ruffin is a specialist in high-temperature gas dynamics, compressible flow aerodynamics, CFD, and airframe-propulsion integration. He is leading the development of a three-dimensional Cartesian-grid-based Navier-Stokes solver for design applications and the development of Cartesian-grid approaches for chemically reacting flows. He has conducted computational and experimental studies of a novel channel concept that provides increased lift/drag ratios for reentry vehicles relative to conventional blunted geometries. Dr. Ruffin is also conducting research on high-speed, high-temperature flows in which vibrational energy modes are substantially excited and in which chemical nonequilibrium exists. He has gained this experience through work in the Thermoscience Division at NASA Ames, NASA Glenn, and during years of high-speed CFD research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Stanford University (Ph.D., 1993), MIT (M.S., 1987), and Princeton University (B.S.E., 1985). FREDRIC H. SCHMITZ recently stepped down as the Martin Professor of Rotorcraft Acoustics Research in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at UM and is now working half-time as a senior research professor at UM and is a visiting professor at Stanford University. Dr. Schmitz has 36 years’ experience in aeronautics, specializing in rotorcraft aeromechanics with an emphasis on rotorcraft acoustics and low-speed aerodynamics. He has received numerous awards and honors for his management accomplishments and his pioneering research. Since 1998, he has been building a new rotorcraft acoustic program at UM that utilizes fundamental experiments to validate key aspects of acoustic theory. His background includes large-scale and model-scale acoustic testing, rotorcraft impulsive noise theory, development of national and international acoustic test facilities, and other contributions to research in acoustics and to research in aeromechanics of low-speed aircraft. He has led both in the development of novel research programs in wind tunnels throughout the world (DNW, The Netherlands, and CEPR-19, France) and in the management of research and operation at the world’s largest wind tunnel, the 40 × 80 × 120 foot wind tunnel (NASA Ames Research Center). Before taking early retirement from NASA Ames in 1998, he served NASA as the director of aeronautics, deputy director of information technology, chief of the Applied Aerodynamics Division, and chief of the Full-Scale Aerodynamics Research Division and the U.S. Army as chief of the Fluid Mechanics Division for the Aeroflightdynamics Directorate at the NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Schmitz has a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering from RPI and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Princeton University. He taught the rotorcraft aeromechanics classes at Stanford University for 18 years while holding positions at NASA and in the Army, achieving the rank of consulting professor. He is a fellow of the AHS and the AIAA, and has a commercial rotary-wing pilot’s license. JOHN SULLIVAN is a professor in the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. He received a B.S. in 1967 from the University of Rochester and an M.S. (1969) and a Ph.D. (1973) in aeronautical engineering from MIT. After graduation, he cofounded a small high-technology company in California. In 1975, he joined the faculty of Purdue University. His administrative experiences there include director of the Center for Advanced Manufacturing, Codirector of the Product Lifecycle Management Center of Excellence, head of the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics (1993-1998), and associate head (1991-1993) and director of the Aerospace Sciences Laboratory (1983-1995). He directs graduate student research in the general area of experimental aerodynamics/fluid mechanics. He is the author or coauthor of approximately 115 technical publications and has served as the major professor for 40 M.S. and 12 Ph.D. thesis graduate students. He spent a sabbatical year at ONR in 1989-1990 and a year at the Boeing Company in 2002. KAREN WILLCOX is associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics in the Aerospace Computational Design Laboratory at MIT. She received a bachelor of engineering degree from the University of Auckland in 1994 and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1996 and 2000, respectively. She spent 1 year as a visiting researcher at Boeing Phantom Works in Long Beach, California, working with the blended-wing-body design team. She joined the MIT faculty in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics in the fall of 2001. Dr. Willcox’s research interests lie in computational simulation and optimization of engineering systems. Her research focuses are firstly in model reduction for large-scale systems, with applications in active flow control, aeroelasticity, and variable-fidelity design methods, and secondly in multidisciplinary system design and optimization, with particular emphasis on economic and environmental factors in aircraft conceptual design. PANEL B: PROPULSION AND POWER ALAN C. ECKBRETH, Panel Chair (see biography above). ROBERT J. BAKOS is the vice president and general manager of ATK GASL. He is responsible for the overall management of the ATK GASL business unit in advanced aeropropulsion and hypersonic technology development. Previously, he has been the vice president of engineering for Allied Aerospace, the vice president of research and development for GASL, and the director of the HYPULSE Laboratory at GASL. Dr. Bakos is the author of over 30 conference and journal papers on the development of hypersonic technologies and test techniques. He is a senior member of the AIAA and serves on the AIAA HyTASP Program Committee. He received his B.S. in civil engineering from Polytechnic University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future engineering from Cornell University and the University of Queensland, respectively. MEYER J. “MIKE” BENZAKEIN (NAE) has experience in both industry and academia. Currently the chair of the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the Ohio State University, he has over 37 years of experience with GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) as the general manager of advanced engineering, where he was responsible for technology maturation and for strengthening the linkage between the preliminary design of engine systems and production hardware design. In a previous assignment, Dr. Benzakein was general manager for engine systems design and integration, where he was responsible for engineering leadership and technical oversight of commercial and military aircraft engine programs. He is a fellow of the AIAA, a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, and was a member of two NRC committees. He was nominated to the NAE for achievements in international technical cooperation and propulsion engine technology. Dr. Benzakein has experience in the design and production process, as well as expertise in engineering materials, noise and emissions, and systems engineering. JAMES L. BETTNER retired from Rolls-Royce Aero Engines in 2002, where he was the Program Manager for the AE 3007H engine, which is the propulsion system for the Air Force’s high-altitude, long-endurance Global Hawk unmanned aerial vehicle. Previously, he was the supervisor of the Preliminary Design Department, where he conducted studies on material properties in advanced engines, convertible engines, gearboxes for high-speed rotorcraft, wave rotors, and fuel-cooled engines. Dr. Bettner also directed ERAST studies of optimum propulsion systems for very-high-altitude research aircraft. He directed the preliminary design of a propulsion system for a large fan-in-wing Special Operations Force aircraft, where the engines powered a conventional fan in forward flight but were clutched to the fan-in-wing for vertical takeoff and landing. He directed the preliminary design analysis of developing a 2000-pound-thrust turbofan from the T800 turboshaft engine for a medium-altitude application. Prior to that, Dr. Bettner was a member of the propfan development team, which included the NASA-funded single-rotation propfan test assessment (PTA) and the company-funded counter-rotation PW-Allison 578 projects. He received his Ph.D. from Purdue University. Dr. Bettner has expertise in engine materials, propfans, and other elements of propulsion. DAVID “ED” CROW (NAE) graduated from the University of Missouri-Rolla with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. He joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut as a distinguished professor in residence in the mechanical engineering department after a distinguished career in industry. Dr. Crow joined Pratt & Whitney in 1966, rising to the position of senior vice president of Pratt & Whitney’s engineering organization in May 1997, where he was responsible for the design, development, validation, and certification of all Pratt & Whitney large commercial engines, military engines, and rocket products. He also led the research and development of advanced technologies systems to meet future aircraft requirements. Dr. Crow previously held the position of senior vice president for Pratt & Whitney’s large commercial engines organization, which included the PW4000 and JT9D high-thrust family of products. He is a past secretary of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and a member of both ASME and AIAA. In addition to having served as past president of Pi Tau Sigma, he has served on the Engineering Advisory Board at Clarkson University and is an elected member of the University of Missouri-Rolla Academy of Mechanical Engineers. He was named a member of the NAE in 1998. Dr. Crow has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and rocket propulsion engineering. MEHRDAD (MARK) EHSANI is Robert M. Kennedy Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Texas A&M University. He is the director of the Power Electronics and Motor Drives Laboratory, the Advanced Vehicle Systems Research Program, and the Texas Applied Power Electronics Consortium (TAPC). Previously, he held positions at the University of Texas Fusion Research Center and at Argonne National Laboratory. Dr. Ehsani is a professional engineer, an IEEE fellow, an SAE fellow, and chairman of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society’s Vehicle Power and Propulsion Committee. He is the author of over 300 publications, 12 books, and over 23 patents. He has won numerous awards for engineering and teaching, including the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society 2001 Avant Garde Award, the BP Amoco Faculty Award for Teaching Excellence in the College of Engineering, and the IEEE Undergraduate Teaching Field Award. He served on the NRC Committee on Assessment of Combat Hybrid Power Systems and the Review of Proposals for NASA’s Low Emissions Alternative Power (LEAP) project. He received a B.S. and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Ehsani has expertise in power electronics, motor drives, vehicle power and propulsion systems, and hybrid vehicles and their control systems. JEFFREY W. HAMSTRA graduated from the University of Michigan with an M.S. in aerospace engineering. Mr. Hamstra is a Lockheed Martin fellow in propulsion integration at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Fort Worth, Texas, and is currently assigned to the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter Vehicle Systems team. He has 21 years of experience in jet propulsion systems integration, including program experience from the F/A-22, F-16, and Skunk Works advanced development programs. He has performed as a research and development principal investigator, air-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future craft project lead, and Propulsion Department manager. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA and deputy director of the AIAA Propulsion and Energy Group. He was inducted as a Lockheed Martin fellow in 2003. He is familiar with the U.S. aircraft engine industry, government propulsion organizations, and propulsion technology development programs and has expertise in propulsion engineering and propulsion systems integration. IVETT A. LEYVA (see biography above). TIMOTHY LIEUWEN is an associate professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. (1995) from Calvin College and his M.S. (1997) and Ph.D. (1999) from the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Lieuwen is the author of two book chapters, 30 refereed journal articles, and over 100 conference publications. He holds four patents and is an associate editor of the Journal of Propulsion and Power. He has consulted with many of the major gas turbine manufacturers. Dr. Lieuwen has held various leadership roles on the Air Breathing Propulsion technical committee of AIAA and the Combustion and Fuels Committee of ASME. Dr. Lieuwen has served on the organizing committees of several major international conferences sponsored by both AIAA and ASME. Dr. Lieuwen’s awards include the National Science Foundation’s CAREER Award, the AIAA Lawrence Sperry Award, and the ASME/International Gas Turbine Institute (GTI) Turbo Expo Best Paper Award. Dr. Lieuwen has expertise in acoustics, combustion, and stability. LOURDES QUINTANA MAURICE is the chief scientific and technical advisor for environment in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Office of Environment and Energy. She serves as the agency technical expert for basic and exploratory research and advanced technology development focused on aircraft environmental impacts and its application to noise and emissions certification. She previously served as the Air Force Deputy, Basic Research Sciences and Propulsion Science and Technology, in the office of the Deputy Associate Secretary of the Air Force for Science and Technology. She also worked at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Propulsion and Power Directorate from 1983 to 1999, planning and executing basic, exploratory, and advanced development propulsion science and technology programs, focusing on state-of-the-art aviation fuels and propulsion systems. Her areas of expertise include pollutant formation chemistry, combustion kinetics, hypersonic propulsion, and aviation fuels. She received a B.Sc. in chemical engineering and an M.Sc. in aerospace engineering from the University of Dayton in Dayton, Ohio, and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of London’s Imperial College at London, United Kingdom. She is also a distinguished graduate of National Defense University’s Industrial College of the Armed Forces, where she earned an M.Sc. in national resource strategy. Dr. Maurice has served as an advisor to the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. She has served on numerous NRC committees, and on the AIAA’s Propellants and Combustion Technical Committee and as the U.S. chair for the AIAA/ International Council of Aeronautical Sciences’ (ICAS’s) International Conference in Celebration of the Centennial of Flight. Dr. Maurice is an associate editor for AIAA’s Journal of Propulsion and Power and serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Aeroacoustics. She has authored over 90 publications and is a 2003 fellow of AIAA. JAMES C. McDANIEL, JR., is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Virginia. He is a member of a number of professional societies, including the AIAA, the American Physical Society (Division of Fluid Dynamics), the OSA, and the Combustion Institute of America. He has served on the AIAA Aerodynamic Measurements Technical Committee and currently serves on the AIAA National Aircraft Design Technical Committee and the National SCRAMJET Testing Standards Committee. He has consulted for numerous companies, including Grumman Aircraft, General Electric, Rocketdyne, and Pratt & Whitney. He received a NASP Distinguished Service Award, several aerospace teaching awards, and has advised numerous competition-winning student aircraft design teams. Dr. McDaniel’s research interests include fluid mechanics, combustion, laser-based flowfield measurements, and aircraft design. He is the director of the Aerospace Research Laboratory, where basic research in high-speed fuel/air mixing and combustion is conducted using laser-induced fluorescence and other nonintrusive optical measurement techniques. He received a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Virginia as well as an M.S. in electrical engineering and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford. He was also an active-duty pilot in the Air Force and holds commercial, multiengine pilot ratings. Dr. McDaniel has expertise in experimental high-speed propulsion. TRESA M. POLLOCK (NAE) is the L.H. and F.E. Van Vlack Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She received a B.S. from Purdue University in 1984 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1989. Dr. Pollock was employed at General Electric Aircraft Engines from 1989 to 1991, where she conducted research and development on high-temperature alloys for aircraft turbine engines. She was a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University from 1991 to 1999. Her research interests are in the processing and properties of high-temperature structural materials, including nickel-base alloys, intermetallics, coatings, and composites. Professor Pollock is president of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) and associate editor of Metallurgical and Materials Transactions. She is a fellow of ASM International and has received the ASM In-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future ternational Research Silver Medal Award. Dr. Pollock was elected to the NAE in 2005. She also served on the NRC’s Committee on Material Science and Engineering: Forging Stronger Links to Users. She has expertise in materials for propulsion applications. WILLIAM TUMAS is a program manager for the Office of Energy and Environment Initiatives at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as well as director of the Los Alamos Institute for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research. He is the lead principal investigator and coordinator of the DOE Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, which comprises seven universities, four companies, and two national laboratories, including LANL. Prior to joining Los Alamos in 1993, Dr. Tumas was a research chemist, then a project leader in environmental and oxidation catalysis at DuPont Central Research. He was also a member of the DuPont Corporate Catalysis Center and the Corporate Environmental Technology Panel. Dr. Tumas received his B.A. in chemistry summa cum laude from Ithaca College in 1980. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Stanford University in 1985 as a National Science Foundation (NSF) graduate fellow and a Hertz Foundation fellow, where he studied the dynamics and reaction mechanisms of gas-phase negative ions. He carried out postdoctoral research in organometallic chemistry at the California Institute of Technology from 1985 to 1987 under a National Institutes of Health (NIH)/ Chaim Weizmann postdoctoral fellowship. Dr. Tumas’s research activities have included chemical hydrogen storage; homogeneous and phase-separable catalysis; catalytic transformations and chemical processing in supercritical fluids and alternate reaction media; green chemistry; and waste treatment technology development and assessment. He is the coeditor of the book Green Chemistry Using Liquid and Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. He has over 45 peer-reviewed publications and has given over 40 invited presentations, including invited talks at seven different Gordon Research Conferences. He chaired the 1998 Gordon Conference on Green Chemistry. Dr. Tumas is also the president of Big Rock Consulting, LLC, through which he has carried out technology assessment for the U.S. Army and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) for over 4 years. He was also a founding board member of the Green Chemistry Institute (1997-2002), which is now part of the American Chemical Society. He participated on three NRC committees, including 5 years on the Committee on Review and Evaluation of the Army Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program, where he contributed to 10 NRC reports. He has expertise in fuel cells and hydrogen power. PANEL C: STRUCTURES AND MATERIALS DIANNE S. WILEY, Panel Chair (see biography above). SATYA N. ATLURI (NAE) is the Samueli/von Karman Chair in Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. Previously, he was the Hightower Chair in Engineering at Georgia Tech and the Jerome Clarke Hunsaker Professor of Aeronautics at MIT. He is a member of the NAE, a distinguished alumnus of the Indian Institute of Science, a fellow of the Third World Academy of Sciences, a member of the European Academy of Sciences, a foreign fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering, an honorary fellow of the International Congress on Fracture, and a fellow of several learned societies, including the American Academy of Mechanics, AIAA, the Aeronautical Society of India, ASME, the U.S. ACM, and the International Association for Computational Mechanics (IACM). He is also the recipient of numerous awards, including the Hilbert Medal, the National Medal of Technology Citation for Distinguished Service, the FAA Excellence in Aviation Award, the Pendray Aerospace Literature Award, and the A.C. Eringen Medal. He has chaired committees for the National Academy of Engineering, the USA-India Science and Technology Forum, and the U.S. Army, as well as numerous technical conferences. He is the editor of a number of journals, including Computer Modeling in Engineering and Sciences, which he also founded. His research includes computational modeling in multidisciplinary engineering and the sciences; structural integrity and damage tolerance of rotorcraft; meshless methods of computational sciences, especially the meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) and the meshless local boundary integral equation (LBIE) methods that he and his students recently pioneered; computational nanoengineering and science; wireless virtual airport for enhanced aviation security; device modeling in microelectromechanical systems; and aging and life-enhancement of aircraft, spacecraft, and power-generating systems. He has performed research for the U.S. Rotorcraft Industry Technology Association, the NSF, ONR, AFOSR, the Army Research Office, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NASA, and many others, including directing major research efforts such as the FAA-sponsored National Center of Excellence for Aging Aircraft and the SAFPAS remote airport project at UCLA. GREGORY CARMAN is professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at UCLA, having been at the university since 1992. He is also head of the Active Materials Laboratory, where research is performed in shape memory alloys, piezoelectric materials, and fiber-optic sensors, focusing on developing and understanding the combined electromagnetothermomechanical response to these active materials. Dr. Carman is a fellow of the ASME, serving in leadership roles within the Adaptive Structures and Materials Systems Committee of the Aerospace Division. He serves on the editorial advisory board of the Journal of Composite Materials and has served in various editorial roles on many other materials journals. Dr. Carman is associate editor on the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures. He was

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future awarded ASME’s Adaptive Structures and Material Systems Prize in 2004 and was an invited lecturer at the NAE’s Annual Frontiers Symposium in 2004. Dr. Carman has spent several summers performing research at government laboratories, including the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the AFOSR at Wright Patterson Air Force Base. He received a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Instititute, an M.S. in metallurgical and materials engineering from the University of Alabama, and a B.S. in engineering science and mechanics from Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Dr. Carman has prior experience in proposal review for the AFOSR, NSF, and Hong Kong Science Foundation. INDERJIT CHOPRA (see biography above). JANET DAVIS is manager of the Composite Structures Department at the Rockwell Scientific Company and has more than 15 years of research experience in materials science. Prior to joining Rockwell Scientific in 1996, she held positions at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cambridge University. Her work has focused on strengthening, toughening, and improving the reliability of advanced materials, especially fiber-reinforced composites and structural ceramics. Her current responsibility is to guide a team of research scientists to develop advanced ceramics and composites, with an emphasis on microstructure and property relationships and robust processing methods. Dr. Davis has extensive experience in ceramic powder processing, composite fabrication, mechanical properties evaluation, and microstructural analysis. She obtained a B.S. in ceramic engineering from the Ohio State University and a Ph.D. (1993) in materials engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and has authored or coauthored more than 30 research publications and two patents. RAVI B. DEO is responsible for space research and technology programs at Northrop Grumman Integrated Systems. During his 27 years at Northrop Grumman, he has been a program and functional manager for government- and company-sponsored projects on cryotanks, integrated system health management, aerospace structures, materials, subsystems, avionics, thermal protection systems, and software development. He has extensive experience in roadmapping technologies, program planning, technical program execution, scheduling, budgeting, proposal preparation, and business management of significant technology development contracts. Among his significant accomplishments are the NASA-funded Space Launch Initiative (SLI), Next-Generation Launch Technology (NGLT), the Orbital Space Plane (OSP), and high-speed research (HSR) programs, where he was responsible for the development of multidisciplinary technologies. Dr. Deo has over 50 technical publications and is the editor of one book. He holds a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. PRABHAT HAJELA is a professor of mechanical, aerospace, and nuclear engineering at RPI. Current research interests include analysis and design optimization of multidisciplinary systems; system reliability; emergent computing paradigms for design; artificial intelligence; and machine learning in multidisciplinary analysis and design. Dr. Hajela recently completed a year as an ASME congressional fellow in the office of Senator Conrad Burns, advising on technology policy. Before joining RPI, he was on the faculty at the University of Florida for 7 years. Dr. Hajela is a fellow of the AIAA, the Aeronautical Society of India, and the ASME, and he is vice president of the International Society of Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization. He has served on the Multidisciplinary Design Optimization Technical Committee of the AIAA and the executive committee for the ASME Aerospace Division (chair, 2001-2002) and was chair of the Division’s Technical Committee on Structures and Materials (1999-2002). He is the editor of Evolutionary Optimization, has served as an associate editor of the AIAA Journal, and is on the editorial board of six other international journals. He has published over 255 papers and articles in the areas of structural and multidisciplinary optimization and is an author or coauthor of four books in these areas. Dr. Hajela has an M.S. and a Ph.D. in aeronautics and astronautics from Stanford University and a B.Tech in aeronautical engineering from IIT at Kanpur, India. He has not previously served on an NRC committee. MARK K. HINDERS holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace and mechanical engineering from Boston University and is currently a professor of applied science at the College of William and Mary in Virginia. Before coming to Williamsburg in 1993, Dr. Hinders was senior scientist at Massachusetts Technological Laboratory, Inc., and a research assistant professor at Boston University. Previously, Dr. Hinders was an electromagnetics research engineer at the Air Force Rome Laboratory located at Hanscom Air Force Base. He conducts research in wave propagation and scattering phenomena applied to medical imaging, intelligent robotics, security screening, remote sensing, and non-destructive evaluation. Dr. Hinders has not previously served on an NRC committee. ROBERT SCHAFRIK is currently the general manager of the Materials and Process Engineering Department at GE Aircraft Engines. He is responsible for developing advanced materials and processes used in GE’s aeronautical turbine engines and their marine and industrial derivatives. He oversees materials application engineering activities supporting GEAE’s global design engineering, manufacturing, and field support activities. He also operates a state-of-the-art in-house laboratory for advanced materials development, character-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future ization, and failure analysis. Prior to joining GE in November 1997, he served in two concurrent positions at the NRC (the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and the NAE), which he joined in 1991: director, National Materials Advisory Board, and director, Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design. Under his direction, 33 final reports for studies were issued that addressed significant national issues in materials and manufacturing. Dr. Schafrik also served in the U.S. Air Force in a variety of capacities and retired as a lieutenant colonel. He has a Ph.D. in metallurgical engineering from Ohio State University, an M.S. in information systems from George Mason University, an M.S. in aerospace engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and a B.S. in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. NANCY R. SOTTOS is a professor in the Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include the mechanics of complex heterogeneous materials (advanced composites, thin-film devices, smart materials); mesoscale characterization; and autonomic materials systems. Her work at the Beckman Institute addresses issues in the development of autonomic materials systems that have the ability to adapt and respond in an independent and automatic fashion. Dr. Sottos’s research group is investigating new experimental methods to quantify autonomic response (e.g., the healing efficiency of a self-healing polymer) and understand this response in terms of the materials chemistry, processing, and microstructure. Dr. Sottos began her career at the University of Illinois in 1991, serving as an assistant professor. In 1997 she became an associate professor, in 1998 she served a 1-year rotating term as assistant dean of engineering, and in 2002 she was promoted to full professor. In 2005, she was named the Donald Biggar Willett Professor of Engineering. She serves as an editorial board member for the Composites Science and Technology journal, as senior technical editor of Experimental Mechanics, and as a technical reviewer for multiple technical journals. Dr. Sottos received a B.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Delaware. She also serves as the faculty advisor for the Student Chapter of the Society of Women Engineers and as national student chapter coordinator for the Society of Engineering Science. GREGORY WASHINGTON holds the rank of professor of mechanical engineering at the Ohio State University (OSU). He is also the associate dean of research for the College of Engineering at OSU. Dr. Washington has been involved in multidomain research for the last 12 years. His core area of interest is dynamic systems, with an emphasis on modeling and control of smart material systems and devices. During this time he has been involved in the following applications: the design and control of mechanically actuated antennas, the design and control of advanced automotive systems incorporating smart materials, the design and control of hybrid electric vehicles, and structural position and vibration control with smart materials. He is presently working on ultralightweight, structurally active antennae and sensory systems that involve the use of smart materials. His specific area of research lies in the modeling and control of novel systems and devices that incorporate smart materials. He is the author of more than 100 technical publications in journals, edited volumes, and conference proceedings. He is a technical reviewer for ASME, AIAA, and IEEE journals, as well as the NSF. He participated in the 2004 NAE Frontiers in Engineering and the Defense Sciences Study Group. He has received multiple research and teaching awards. He received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from North Carolina State University. TERRENCE A. WEISSHAAR is professor of aeronautics and astronautics at Purdue University and is currently a program manager at DARPA. Dr. Weisshaar’s research areas center on aircraft design, structural optimization processes, and integration of aerospace technologies into vehicle conceptual and preliminary design. His past research contributions include development of aeroelastic design tailoring with advanced composite materials, and studies that assisted in the development of the DARPA X-29 research aircraft. He led fundamental aeroelastic research efforts for aircraft configurations such as the oblique-wing supersonic aircraft, the X-wing stopped rotor, and the joined-wing Sensorcraft. In addition, over the past decade, he developed smart material aeroelastic control concepts for aircraft structures. Dr. Weisshaar is a fellow of the AIAA, a past member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, and the 2005 recipient of the AIAA Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Award. He received the Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Decoration in 1998. Dr. Weisshaar has both research and development experience in integrated aircraft structural design coupled to active control devices systematically interfaced toward optimum aircraft performance. His research skills will assist the committee in identifying opportunities in research and development technologies in the systems control of aircraft performance for advanced UAVs. PANEL D: DYNAMICS, NAVIGATION, AND CONTROL, AND AVIONICS NANCY G. LEVESON (NAE), Panel Chair (see biography above). RICHARD ABBOTT is a technical fellow emeritus at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Palmdale, California. He received a Ph.D. in chemical physics from Northern Illinois University, where his research concentrated on cooperative phenomena in molecular systems and the renormalization group. He continued studies as a research

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future associate in statistical mechanics at the University of Chicago’s James Franck Institute, where he contributed to theories of energy relaxation in condensed media using Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques. His career includes over 25 years of experience in the areas of guidance, navigation, and control systems design and analysis, sensor data fusion design, and sensor system simulation and modeling for both manned and unmanned aircraft. He has supervised the development and execution of large-scale simulations of complex air vehicles, led the development of the avionics functional architecture for the demonstration/ validation phase of the YF-22 program, and developed fault detection and redundancy management algorithms for navigation systems aboard the X-33 single-stage-to-orbit vehicle. He also has served as principal investigator for the DARPA software-enabled control technologies for reliable autonomous control project and has been the co-chair for the Technologies for Autonomous Control session of the IEEE Aerospace Conferences. CLARK R. BADIE is the business manager for the Displays and Crew Interface Division of Honeywell Aerospace Marketing and Project Management. In addition, he is the U.S. chairperson for the Avionics Harmonization Working Group, which leads the development of new and modified joint federal-European regulations and advisory material for advanced flight-deck displays. Previously, he was the product portfolio manager for strategic marketing and technology, where he aligned avionics product strategies with customer needs and was involved in strategic planning. Other positions he has held at Honeywell include manager of Honeywell Head-Up Displays Development; manager of product marketing and advanced technology for air transport displays; department manager for legacy and head-up displays systems and software engineering; and principal engineer for commercial electronic displays engineering. He has worked extensively with all avionics product disciplines: displays, flight controls, management systems and sensors, as well as certification issues such as software, flight test, safety, and environmental evaluation. Mr. Badie received a B.E. from the Stevens Institute of Technology and an MBA from Arizona State University. JEFFERY ERICKSON is a senior technical fellow for human factors and crew system design at the Boeing Company, where he is responsible for technical leadership of advanced human–machine interface technology initiatives and their application to aircraft; spacecraft; command, control, communications, and computers; and intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance. He is currently assigned to the Boeing Phantom Works, which develops advanced products and provides enabling technologies, prototypes, engineering processes, and advanced methods. Previously he served as the manager of human–system integration for the Boeing Phantom Works and as the manager of crew systems for McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. He is a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and has served on a number of advisory panels, such as the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Naval Research Advisory Committee, and the Department of Defense Technical Advisory Group for Human Factors, among others. Mr. Erickson has received the Exceptional Civilian Service Medal from the Secretary of the Air Force, the Outstanding Achievement Award from McDonnell Aircraft and Missile Systems, and the Engineering Achievement Award from Douglas Aircraft. He received a B.A. in psychology and an M.S. in industrial psychology from California State University, Long Beach. EPHRAHIM GARCIA is currently associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell University, where his interests lie in the development of new types of actuation systems utilizing smart material transducers, system-level demonstrations of smart structures applied to defense platforms, and morphing aircraft systems bioinspired intelligent machines. Dr. Garcia served as a program manager in the Defense Sciences Office at DARPA from 1998 to 2002. From 1991 to 1998, he was an assistant and associate professor of mechanical engineering at Vanderbilt University, where he was director of the Center for Intelligent Mechatronics and the Smart Structures Laboratory. In this capacity he directed research in the areas of smart structures, control structure interaction, and bioinspired robotics. From 1991 to 1997, he owned and operated Garman Systems, Inc. (now Dynamic Structures and Materials, LLC), a small engineering corporation that designed and fabricated devices in adaptive structural systems utilizing piezoelectric, electrostrictive, and shape memory alloy materials. Dr. Garcia has been named an ONR Young Investigator, appointed a 1993 Presidential Faculty Fellow by President Clinton, and twice (1990 and 1991) received Summer Faculty Fellowship awards from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. In 1995, he was named Most Promising Scientist by Hispanic Engineer magazine (now Technica) and received this award at the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference. Dr. Garcia is author of more than 140 articles, books, chapters, and edited volumes. He serves on the ASME Aerospace Division’s Executive Committee and is on the editorial advisory board of Smart Materials and Structures. In 2002, Dr. Garcia received ASME’s Adaptive Structures Prize for “significant contributions to the sciences and technologies associated with adaptive structures and/or materials systems.” CHARLES L. GUTHRIE is the director of advanced capabilities development for Northrop Grumman’s Western Region within the Integrated Systems Sector. He is responsible for programs in space systems, future strike systems, missile defense systems, and naval system integration. Some of his previous positions include director of unmanned systems rapid prototyping and advanced concepts at the Boeing Phan-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future tom Works, director of the Joint Strike Fighter air vehicle IPT for Boeing Military Aircraft and Missiles, and director of air vehicle advance design for the Phantom Works. He is a Boeing technical fellow and was named Manager of the Year in 1993 and 1994 by North American Aircraft and the Southern California Area Council, respectively, and Engineer of the Year in 1987 and 1988 by North American Aircraft/Rockwell. Besides earning a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Kansas, Mr. Guthrie has completed a number of technical short courses in topics such as radar, aircraft design, and engine–airframe integration and employee development courses. He works to support the California Polytechnic San Luis Obispo School of Engineering, the University of Kansas Aerospace Department, the Naval Postgraduate School, and Cal State Long Beach by providing industry feedback, serving on advisory boards, and conducting guest lectures. He is a senior member of the AIAA and has served on its Aircraft Design Technical Committee. He is also a senior member of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) and a member of the National Management Association (NMA). ELLIS F. HITT is president of Strategic Systems Solutions. He is responsible for analysis of alternative systems configurations and determining total life cycle cost for the U.S. Coast Guard’s HC-130 fleet. He retired in 2005 as a senior manager for Battelle Corporation and was a chairman of the AIAA Digital Avionics Technical Committee. He has a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Kansas and an M.S. in electrical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, along with postgraduate studies at OSU and the University of New Mexico. Mr. Hitt is a nationally recognized authority on avionics and flight control systems. He has extensive experience in conceptual, preliminary, and final design of avionics, including navigation, guidance, control, communications, controls and displays, sensors, stores management, weapons delivery, and electrical power subsystems; integration, testing, and analysis of avionics; development of mathematical models and computer programs for performing error analysis, systems simulation and evaluation, and life-cycle cost analyses; and mission software design, development, validation, and verification. Mr. Hitt’s responsibilities before retiring from Battelle included senior marketing manager for the Air Force market sector and technical leader on total ownership cost. Prior to promotion to these positions, he was chief engineer, Design Engineering Program, and manager, Avionics Systems Engineering Business Development. JAMES C. NEIDHOEFER is the CEO of Aerotonomy, Inc., which specializes in the development of advanced UAVs; UAV guidance, navigation, and control systems; and UAV flight-test-related products and services. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA, deputy director of the AIAA Information Systems Group, a past chairman of the AIAA Intelligent Systems Technical Committee, and associate editor for the AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information and Communication and has chaired a number of AIAA conference sessions. He is also a member of Penn State University’s Industrial and Professional Advisory Committee. Dr. Neidhoefer was a recipient of the Best Paper Award at the international conference Artificial Neural Networks in Engineering. In addition, he is the author of numerous conference papers, journal articles, and book chapters. He received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. from the University of Alabama. DARRYLL J. PINES is a professor and associate chair in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at UM, College Park, on loan as a program manager in the DARPA Defense Sciences Office. At DARPA, he is the program manager of the sensor dart, long gun, XNAV, and NAV programs. As a former DOE technical staff member working at the LLNL, Dr. Pines developed advanced guidance algorithms for interceptors and the final approach algorithm for the 1994 Clementine flyby mission, which was the first probe to discover water near the south pole of the Moon. His research interests include smart materials/structures technology, structural health monitoring, structural dynamics, micro and nano air vehicle systems, and vehicle guidance, control, and navigation. He has published over five book chapters and 200 journal/conference articles on topics in structural dynamics, damage detection, and vehicle flight dynamics, control, and navigation. He is an associate fellow of the AIAA, a fellow of the Institute of Physics, and chairs the Adaptive Structures Technical Committee of the AIAA. Dr. Pines graduated from MIT with Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering and earned his B.S. degree from UC Berkeley in the same discipline. JAMES RANKIN is the director of the Avionics Engineering Center at Ohio University. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Iowa State University. His M.S.E.E. is also from Iowa State University and his B.S.E.E. from the South Dakota School of Mines and Technology. He has more than 25 years of experience in avionics research and design from both academic and industrial perspectives. Dr. Rankin has been involved with the NASA small aircraft transportation system. Previously, he was the PI on terminal area controller-pilot data link communications research, which was integral to NASA’s low-visibility landing and surface operations flight test at Atlanta Hartsfield airport (1997) and the NASA runway incursion prevention system test at Dallas-Fort Worth airport (2000). Dr. Rankin was with Rockwell Collins, where his projects included airborne collision avoidance systems, four-dimensional flight management systems, and air transport display systems. As a senior member (2003) of the IEEE, he was twice elected (1999, 2002) to 3-year terms on the IEEE Aerospace and Electronic Systems board of governors. He is a senior member (2003) of the AIAA and was

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future elected chair of the AIAA Digital Avionics Technical Committee in 2003. Dr. Rankin also has memberships in the Institute of Navigation (ION), Air Traffic Control Association, International Loran Association, and the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association. He is an active member of the aviation community as a certified flight instructor with single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings. JASON L. SPEYER (NAE) is currently a professor and past chairman in the Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering Department (now the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department) at UCLA. He spent a research leave as Lady Davis Visiting Professor at the Technion (Israel Institute of Technology) in 1983 and was the 1990 Jerome C. Hunsaker Visiting Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT. His industrial experience includes research at Boeing, Raytheon, Analytical Mechanics Associated, and the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory. He was the Harry H. Power Professor in Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas, Austin. Dr. Speyer was twice elected member of the board of governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society and chairman of the Technical Committee on Aerospace Controls. He served as an associate editor for Technical Notes and Correspondence (1975-1976) and Stochastic Control (1978-1979), IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets (1976-1977), the AIAA Journal of Guidance and Control (1977-1978), and the Journal of Optimization Theory and Applications (1981-present). From October 1987 to October 1991 and from October 1997 to October 2001, he served as a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. He is a fellow of both the AIAA and the IEEE (life fellow). He was the recipient of the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award (1985), the AIAA Dryden Lectureship in Research (1995), the IEEE Third Millennium Medal (2000), and the Air Force Exceptional Civilian Decoration (1991 and 2001). Dr. Speyer received his B.S. in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT in 1960 and his Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Harvard University in 1968. JOHN VALASEK (see biography above). PANEL E: INTELLIGENT AND AUTONOMOUS SYSTEMS, OPERATIONS AND DECISION MAKING, HUMAN INTEGRATED SYSTEMS, AND NETWORKING AND COMMUNICATIONS EDMOND L. SOLIDAY, Panel Chair (see biography above). ELLA ATKINS is an assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at UM, where she cofounded the Autonomous Vehicles Laboratory and is an active researcher in the Space Systems Laboratory and Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center. She holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from MIT and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and engineering from the University of Michigan. Her research integrates task-level planning and scheduling with trajectory optimization algorithms for safety-critical robotic systems and flight vehicles. Dr. Atkins is an active member of the AIAA Intelligent Systems technical committee, associate editor of the AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication, and is a private pilot. She has written more than 50 papers that develop and apply real-time, artificial intelligence and optimization strategies to aerospace applications. TAMER BASAR (NAE) is the Fredric G. and Elizabeth H. Nearing Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He is also a professor in the Center for Advanced Study of UIUC. His research interests include robust nonlinear and adaptive control; routing, pricing, and congestion control in communication networks; control over wired and wireless networks; mobile computing; and risk-sensitive estimation and control. He is a fellow of the IEEE as well as of the International Federation of Automatic Control and a past president of the Control Systems Society and the International Society of Dynamic Games. He has edited a number of books, book series, and journals, including Automatica and IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control. He has authored or coauthored over 150 journal articles and book chapters, over 200 conference publications and several books. He has received the Giorgio Quazza Medal of the International Federation of Automatic Control, the Hendrik W. Bode Lecture Prize of the IEEE Control Systems Society, the IEEE Millennium Medal, and the Medal of Science of Turkey, among many other awards. Dr. Basar received his B.S.E.E. from Robert College, Istanbul, and M.S., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees in engineering and applied science at Yale University. THOMAS Q. CARNEY is professor of aviation technology and head of the Department of Aviation Technology at Purdue University, where he has taught since 1972. Dr. Carney has over 37 years of experience as a pilot, with more than 10,130 flight hours, and holds the ATP certificate with multiengine, Beechjet, and Mitsubishi Diamond type ratings in addition to the Certified Flight Instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, multiengine, and instrument ratings. Dr. Carney’s primary teaching areas in aviation include advanced aviation meteorology, high-performance turbine operations, high-altitude flight, and corporate flight department management. Dr. Carney holds an M.S. and a Ph.D. in atmospheric science; his primary areas of interest in atmospheric science include aviation meteorology and the impact of weather on aviation operations, synoptic-scale dynamics and energetics, and the interactions between synoptic- and mesoscale motion fields. Dr. Carney is the senior editor of the Collegiate Aviation Review and a member of the editorial

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future boards of the Journal of Aviation/Aerospace Education and Research and the Journal of Air Transportation. He serves on the board of directors of the Council on Aviation Accreditation (CAA), the Certified Aviation Manager governing board (and is currently serving as that board’s first chairperson), and is chairperson of the CAA Standards Committee. Dr. Carney is an active consultant in corporate flight operations and an expert witness in litigation involving flight operations and aviation meteorology. In 2002, he was awarded the William A. Wheatley award by the University Aviation Association, given annually to a professional educator of more than 10 years’ experience, who has made outstanding contributions to aerospace education. In 2004, he was designated a Certified Aviation Manager by the Certified Aviation Manager governing board. JOHN-PAUL CLARKE is an associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering and director of the Air Transportation Laboratory at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech). His research and teaching address issues of optimization and robustness in aircraft and airline operations, air traffic management, and the environmental impact of aviation. He received his S.B. (1991), S.M. (1992), and Sc.D. (1997) from MIT and was a faculty member at MIT prior to moving to Georgia Tech. He has also been a researcher at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a visiting scholar at the Boeing Company. Dr. Clarke is a member of the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operations Research Societies, AIAA, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), ION, and Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society. He serves on several national and international committees, including the FAA Research Engineering and Development Committee (REDAC), the AIAA Air Transportation Systems Technical Committee, and the SAE Aircraft Noise Committee. Dr. Clarke was the first director of the Partnership for AiR Transportation Noise and Emissions Research (PARTNER) at the Center of Excellence for Aviation Noise and Aircraft Emissions Mitigation and is an active researcher in both PARTNER and the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research (NEXTOR). In 1999, he was awarded the AIAA/AAAE/ACC Jay Hollingsworth Speas Airport Award, and in 2003, he was awarded the FAA Excellence in Aviation Award. Dr. Clarke is currently a member of ASEB. MICHAEL DeWALT is a former national resource specialist for software for the FAA. Currently, he is the chief scientist of aviation systems for Certification Services, Inc., a consulting firm for electronic equipment in aviation. In the FAA, Mr. DeWalt was responsible for providing technical guidance on policy, training, research, and development in airborne software and its associated ground-based systems; he was the technical focal point for industry and the FAA for evaluation of new technology and interpretation of existing policy as applied to aircraft systems. Prior to becoming the FAA’s national resource specialist, Mr. DeWalt worked as a software life-cycle consultant for Telos Consulting Services, as a software control system engineer for Pacific Technologies, Inc., as an avionics certification engineer for the FAA, as software focus for the Boeing 757/767 autopilot, and as a digital and analog avionics engineer for Honeywell Flight Systems. He has given many presentations at national and international conferences on design assurance of safety-critical, software-based systems. He is a member of IEEE and has participated as a member of working groups drafting new standards for safety-critical software and revising IEEE document 1012, “Standards for Verification and Validation,” and is a member of the Association of Computing Machinery. He received a B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Washington and an M.S. in software engineering from Seattle University. Mr. DeWalt previously served on two NRC study groups. FRANK L. FRISBIE is vice president for strategic planning in the transportation sector of Apptis, Inc. He was a longtime senior executive with the FAA and DoD and was vice president and senior client executive for civil aviation with Northrop Grumman Information Technology before joining Apptis in January 2005. He joined the FAA in 1958, where he held a variety of positions. In his last two posts, he was directly responsible for research, development, system engineering, acquisition, deployment, and maintenance of all 20,000 air traffic control facilities in the United States. Mr. Frisbie was awarded the Glen A. Gilbert Memorial Award in 2002 by the Air Traffic Control Association (ATCA) for his long-standing contributions to the air traffic control and civil aviation communities. He has been involved with the development, deployment, maintenance, and operation of virtually every system employed in the U.S. civil aviation infrastructure. He earned his B.E.E. degree from Manhattan College and his M.B.A. degree from American University. He is a member of the NASA Aeronautics Research Advisory Board, a member of the Russian Academy of Navigation and Motion Control, and he holds a professional engineer’s license. ANDREW LACHER is a research strategist working on system transformation and security for MITRE Corporation’s Center for Advanced Aviation Systems Development (CAASD), where he helps coordinate internally directed R&D efforts as well as cross-corporate research issues associated with unmanned aircraft systems. He also manages CAASD’s collaboration and interaction with NASA and works closely with the FAA Joint Planning and Development Office (JPDO) on the definition of NGATS. Mr. Lacher is a member of the JPDO’s Agile Air Traffic Services integrated product team and its executive committee. He serves on the FAA’s RE&D Advisory Committee’s Air Traffic Services subcommittee and on the NEXTOR steering com-

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future mittee. He was a leader in formulation and eventual implementation of the collaborative decision-making (CDM) approach for air traffic management and led a number of studies that helped illustrate the benefit and feasibility of CDM and helped define many of the early concepts. Previously, he was a product manager for Orbcomm and a strategic information technology consultant working with small airlines. He is an associate fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and a member of the Airline Dispatcher Foundation, INFORMS, and the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies (AGIFORS). Mr. Lacher received both an M.S. in operations research and a B.S. in electrical engineering from the George Washington University. RAYMOND R. LaFREY retired as manager of the air traffic control mission area at MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory in 2003. His responsibilities encompassed surveillance, navigation, communications, and weather sensing and involved 150 staff and support personnel. Key elements include the development of airport surface technology, modern open architecture surveillance systems, and integrated airport and regional weather systems that provide time-critical weather knowledge directly to operational staff at FAA and airline facilities. After receiving a B.S.E.E. and an M.S.E.E. at Michigan State University, Mr. LaFrey served 6 years in the U.S. Army as a Signal Corps officer, installing satellite communications ground stations in Europe, Africa, and Vietnam. He joined MIT Lincoln Laboratory in 1969 and began developing air traffic control technology in 1974. From 1977 to 1982, he led the team that developed the first TCAS II flight hardware and conducted surveillance flight-test activities. During the 1980s he led the development and flight-testing of a GPS navigation set for small aircraft. He also led the Precision Runway Monitor Program, which enabled simultaneous instrument approaches to parallel runways spaced as close as 3,000 feet. He has served on a variety of advisory boards, including the American Astronautical Society’s (AAS’s) Recovery Team and a Defense Science Board task force on aviation safety. Mr. LaFrey is currently a member of the FAA’s REDAC and the REDAC Air Traffic Services Subcommittee, and he chaired a REDAC study on transitioning research to operational capabilities. Mr. LaFrey has received FAA awards for his work on the traffic collision avoidance system, the precision runway monitor, and the ASR-9. He is also an inactive instrument-rated pilot. CARL McCULLOUGH retired from the federal service in November 2005. His last position, as a member of the Senior Executive Service, was associate director for airspace, ranges, and airfield operations, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff for Air and Space Operations, Headquarters of the U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. In addition, he is the executive director for the DoD Policy Board on Federal Aviation. Mr. McCullough is responsible for providing worldwide access to airspace and ranges, as well as deployable combat-capable air traffic control, airfield management, and base operations personnel and equipment. He also represents DoD positions in support of the U.S. National Airspace System as a seamless partner with the FAA. In addition, he provides strategic vision for Air Force and DoD participation and partnering in modernization of U.S. and global air transportation systems, as well as civil aviation policy formulation, airspace and aircraft access, air traffic control infrastructure, and international cooperation, to include all regional airspace initiatives. Mr. McCullough is the primary point of contact between the DoD and the Department of Transportation on domestic and international civil aviation issues with potential impact on military flying operations and air defense. Previously, Mr. McCullough served 24 years as a naval aviator. In his final tour he commanded the Naval Plant Representative Office at McDonnell Douglas Corporation in St. Louis. Following his retirement from the Navy in 1990, Mr. McCullough served with McDonnell Douglas Helicopter Company as general manager of its MD-500 program and then as vice president of the RAIL Company’s Eastern Region. From 1993 to 2002, Mr. McCullough held numerous managerial and executive assignments with the FAA, including program manager for the wind shear and weather radar programs, program manager for satellite navigation systems, and director of the Office of Communication, Navigation, and Surveillance Systems. In May 2002, he was assigned to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy as a Department of Transportation representative to the National Science and Technology Council. He is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and the Naval Postgraduate School. AMY PRITCHETT (see biography above). DONALD W. RICHARDSON is a fellow of the AIAA and has been a member of AIAA continuously for 57 years. He is currently the immediate past president of the AIAA and served as the president of AIAA in 2004 and 2005. He has been named as a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society and was recently co-opted by the Royal Aeronautical Society to serve on its Engineering Council for 2003-2004. He was awarded the NASA Public Service Medal in 2002 for his work in reinvigorating U.S. federal funding for R&D in aeronautics. He holds bachelor’s, master’s, and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautical and mechanical engineering. A commercial instrument pilot with multiengine land and seaplane ratings, he has been an active pilot for 58 years. His engineering career included assignments as an aerodynamics and flight test engineer, research pilot, and engineering manager. He is presently employed as a vice president of SAIC, where he is responsible for all FAA and civil aviation corporate activities.

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Decadal Survey of Civil Aeronautics: Foundation for the Future NADINE SARTER is currently an associate professor in the Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering and the Center for Ergonomics at the University of Michigan. She received her M.S. degree in experimental/applied psychology from the University of Hamburg (Germany) in 1983 and her Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from OSU in 1994. Dr. Sarter’s primary research interests include (1) the design of multimodal interfaces in support of effective human–machine communication and coordination and computer-supported collaborative work, (2) the development of robust and transparent decision support systems, and (3) the use of design and training to support error management in a variety of complex event-driven domains, such as aviation and military operations. From 1994 to 1996, she served as technical advisor to the FAA Human Factors Team to provide recommendations for the design and operation of and training for advanced glass cockpit aircraft. For her research in the aviation domain, she received Aviation Week and Space Technology’s Aerospace Laurels Award for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Commercial Air Transport in 1996 and the TGIR (Turning Goals Into Reality) Award as member of the UIUC Aircraft Icing Project Team from NASA Glenn Research Center in 2001. Her aviation-related research was supported by NASA, the FAA, and an NSF CAREER award.