Appendixes

The appendixes provide information on this project and additional details and background information for the material in the report.

Appendixes D, E, F, and G were prepared by individual committee members or subgroups. They are reproduced on the CD-ROM that contains the full report but are not included in the printed report owing to space limitations.



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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs Appendixes The appendixes provide information on this project and additional details and background information for the material in the report. Appendix A, “Committee Biographical Information,” includes brief biographies of all the committee members. Appendix B, “Presentations and Committee Meetings,” lists all the meetings that the committee held and the presenters who supplied information at the public meetings. Appendix C, “Acronyms,” identifies the acronyms in the report. Appendix D, “Supply Technologies,” provides additional details and background information on the generating and transmission options discussed in Chapter 3. Appendix E, “Paying for Reliability in Deregulated Markets,” provides the information from which the first section of Chapter 4, “Regulation, Finance, and Reliability,” was extracted. Appendix F, “Background for the System Reliability and Cost Analysis,” describes the process by which the New York Independent System Operator ensures reliability and the details of the committee’s analysis of future scenarios, as discussed in Chapter 5. Appendix G, “Demand-Side Measures,” documents the energy-efficiency and demand-reduction technologies discussed in Chapter 2. Appendixes D, E, F, and G were prepared by individual committee members or subgroups. They are reproduced on the CD-ROM that contains the full report but are not included in the printed report owing to space limitations.

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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs A Committee Biographical Information Lawrence T. Papay (NAE), Chair, is currently a consultant with a variety of clients in electric power and other energy areas. Previously he held positions including senior vice president for the Integrated Solutions Sector, Science Applications International Corporation, and senior vice president and general manager of Bechtel Technology and Consulting. He also held several positions at Southern California Edison, including senior vice president, vice president, general superintendent, and director of research and development (R&D), with responsibilities for areas including bulk power generation, system planning, nuclear power, environmental operations, and development of the organization and plans for the company’s R&D efforts. Dr. Papay’s professional affiliations have included the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Research Advisory Committee, the Atomic Industrial Forum, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Energy Research Advisory Board, and the Renewable Energy Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the National Science Foundation’s Industrial Panel on Science and Technology. His expertise and knowledge range across a wide variety of electric system technologies, from production, to transmission and distribution, utility management and systems, and end-use technologies. He received a B.S. degree in physics from Fordham University, and S.M. and Sc.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Dan E. Arvizu is the director and chief executive of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He was formerly a senior vice president and chief technology officer for the Federal and Industrial Client Groups of CH2M Hill Companies, Ltd., and before that, a vice president and director of the Energy and Industrial Systems Business Group. Prior to working at CH2M Hill, Dr. Arvizu worked at Sandia National Laboratories—as director, Materials and Process Sciences Center; director, Advanced Energy Technology and Policy Center; and director, Technology Transfer Center. Dr. Arvizu was also a member of the technical staff, Customer Switching Systems, Bell Telephone Laboratories. He has experience as an executive in managing a business profit and loss, and in corporate technology commercialization as well as extensive experience in materials science applications for nuclear weapons and energy systems, and in the development of renewable energy systems, including solar thermal, photovoltaic, and concentrating solar collectors. He has been recognized for excellence in the management of technology transfer and renewable energy R&D programs. In 2004, Dr. Arvizu was appointed by President Bush to serve on the National Science Board. He received the 1996 Hispanic Engineer’s National Achievement Award for Executive Excellence and has served on a number of advisory groups, including the Commercialization Advisory Board for the Solar II Central Receiver Pilot Plant. He served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Programmatic Review of the Office of Power Technologies. He received his B.S. degree from New Mexico State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, all in mechanical engineering. Jan Beyea is chief scientist, Consulting in the Public Interest, and is a consultant to the National Audubon Society. He consults on nuclear physics and other energy/environmental topics for numerous local, national, and international organizations. He has been chief scientist and vice president, National Audubon Society, and has held positions at the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies, Princeton University, Holy Cross College, and Columbia University. He has served as a member of numerous advisory committees and panels including the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Energy and Environmental Systems; the NRC Energy Engineering Board; the NRC Committee on Alternative Energy R&D Strategies; the NRC Committee to Review DOE’s Fine Particulates Research Plan; the Secretary of Energy’s Advisory Board, Task Force on Economic Modeling; and the policy committee of the Recycling Advisory Council. Dr. Beyea has been an advisor to various stud-

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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs ies of the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment. He has expertise in energy technologies and associated environmental and health concerns and has written numerous articles on the environment and energy. He received a B.A. from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. Peter Bradford advises and teaches restructuring and energy policy in the United States and abroad. He has been a visiting lecturer in energy policy and environmental protection at Yale University and has taught utility law at the Vermont Law School, where he is currently teaching a course on nuclear power and public policy. He is also affiliated with the Regulatory Assistance Project, which provides assistance to state and federal regulatory commissions regarding energy regulatory policy and environmental protection. Mr. Bradford was a member of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1977-1982). He has served on panels advising the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development on how best to replace the remaining Chernobyl nuclear plants in Ukraine and advising the Austrian Institute for Risk Reduction on regulatory issues associated with opening the Mochovce Nuclear Plant in Slovakia. He chaired the New York State Public Service Commission and the Maine Public Utilities Commission, and was also briefly Maine’s Public Advocate. Mr. Bradford has written extensively on energy regulatory and energy security issues. He is a graduate of Yale University and the Yale Law School. Marilyn A. Brown is the interim director of the Engineering Science and Technology Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). During her 22 years at ORNL, Dr. Brown has researched the impacts of policies and programs aimed at advancing the market entry of sustainable energy technologies and has led several energy technology and policy scenario studies. Prior to serving at ORNL, she was a tenured associate professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where she conducted research on the diffusion of energy innovations. She has authored more than 140 publications and has been an expert witness in hearings before committees of both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives. She has received awards for her research from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, the Association of American Geographers, the Technology Transfer Society, and the Association of Women in Science. A recent study that she co-led (Scenarios for a Clean Energy Future) was the subject of two Senate hearings, has been cited in proposed federal legislation, and has had a significant role in international climate change debates. Dr. Brown serves on the boards of directors of several energy, engineering, and environmental organizations (including the Alliance to Save Energy and the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy), and she serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Technology Transfer. She is also a member of the National Commission on Energy Policy. She has a Ph.D. in geography from Ohio State University and a master’s degree in resource planning from the University of Massachusetts. She is also a certified energy manager. Alexander E. Farrell is assistant professor in the Energy and Resources Group at the University of California, Berkeley. He is working on characterizing environmental impacts of energy production and transformation, especially air pollution and greenhouse gases, and in the economic, political, and other social aspects of energy systems with reduced environmental impacts. Previously, Dr. Farrell had been adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University and executive director of the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center. He had been a research fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government and at the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center, University of Pennsylvania. He also was an engineer at Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and served as a nuclear submarine officer in the U.S. Navy. He has a B.S. degree in systems engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy and a Ph.D. in energy management and policy from the University of Pennsylvania. Samuel M. Fleming is currently a consultant. His prior positions include executive assistant to the executive vice president for strategic planning and technology commercialization of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC; senior program manager in the Operations Department of Bechtel Technology and Consulting; commercial development manager and program manager for Bechtel R&D’s Cargoscan™ program; manager of the Advanced Processes Department in Bechtel R&D; project operations manager for renewable energy and fuels technologies in Bechtel R&D; manager, Process Technology Department, Bechtel R&D; manager of advanced technology planning, Fluor Engineers, Inc.; and director of technology, the Badger Company, Inc. Dr. Fleming’s expertise spans a wide range in advanced technology and engineering development, economic evaluation of technologies, and project management. He has worked on various types of technology development, including advanced fuel and gas conversion, nuclear, solar, wind, geothermal, drilling, biotechnology, cargo detection, superconducting magnetic storage, and gas pipelines. He has a B.S. (Pennsylvania State University), S.M. (MIT), and Sc.D. (MIT) in chemical engineering. George M. Hidy is principal of Envair/Aerochem. He is the retired Alabama Industries Professor of Environmental Engineering at the University of Alabama, where he was also adjunct professor of environmental health science in the School of Public Health. From 1987 to 1994, he was technical vice president of the Electric Power Research Institute, where he managed the Environmental Division and was a member of the Management Council. From 1984 to 1987, he

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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs was president of the Desert Research Institute of the University of Nevada. He has held a variety of other scientific positions in universities and industry and has made significant contributions to research on the environmental impacts of energy use, including work on atmospheric diffusion and mass transfer, aerosol dynamics, and chemistry. He is the author of many articles and books on these and related topics. Dr. Hidy received a B.S. in chemistry and chemical engineering from Columbia University, an M.S.E. in chemical engineering from Princeton University, and a D.Eng. in chemical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University. James R. Katzer (NAE) was manager of strategic planning and program analysis for ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, where he was responsible for primary technology-planning and analysis activities and for future-focused technology-planning activities. Prior to that he was vice president, technology, Mobil Oil Corporation, with primary responsibilities for ensuring Mobil’s overall technical health, developing forward-looking technology scenarios, identifying and analyzing technology and environmental developments and trends, guiding Mobil’s long-term directions on the basis of strategic technical drivers, and identifying future threats and opportunities and recommending strategies to deal with them. Dr. Katzer joined the Central Research Laboratory of the Mobil Oil Corporation in 1981, later becoming manager of process research and technical service and vice president of planning and finance for Mobil Research and Development Corporation. Before joining Mobil he was a professor on the chemical engineering faculty at the University of Delaware and the first director of the Center for Catalytic Science and Technology there. Dr. Katzer has more than 80 publications in technical journals, holds several patents, and co-authored and edited several books. He received a B.S. degree from Iowa State and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from MIT. Parker D. Mathusa is a member of the Board of Directors—Research Scientist, New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA). Formerly he was program director, Energy Resources, Transportation and Environmental Research Program, NYSERDA, where he was responsible for establishing research programs and policies required to develop new energy technologies and environmental mitigation measures that could contribute to New York State’s energy supply needs, with a focus on renewable energy resources, advanced transportation technologies, and environmental products. Dr. Mathusa’s previous positions include service as chief, Utility Research and Demand Management, New York State Public Service Commission, in which he developed a comprehensive R&D program for electric and gas utilities, and engineering positions at Yankee Atomic Electric Company and Bechtel Corporation. He has been involved in the evaluation of a number of emerging energy technologies and associated environmental mitigation measures, including fuel cells, hybrid electric vehicles, and photovoltaic systems, and has published numerous assessments of energy technologies. He has served on numerous advisory panels including federal and state advisory groups. He has a B.S. in physics from the State University of New York at Albany and an M.S. in engineering management from Northeastern University. Timothy Mount is professor of applied economics and management at Cornell University. His research and teaching interests include econometric modeling and policy analysis relating to the use of fuels and electricity and to their environmental consequences (acid rain, smog, and global warming). Professor Mount is currently conducting research on the restructuring of markets for electricity and the implications for (1) price behavior in auctions for electricity, (2) the rates charged to customers, and (3) investment decisions for maintaining system adequacy. He has spent sabbaticals at the University of New South Wales, Australia, and the London School of Economics and the University of Manchester, United Kingdom. He has a B.S. from Wye College, University of London, and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. Francis J. Murray, Jr., is an energy and environmental consultant, providing strategic policy and market-development guidance on energy and environmental issues for private sector clients. His previous positions include consultant to the Office of Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs, U.S. Department of Energy; chairman of NYSERDA, and commissioner of energy in the New York State Energy Office; deputy secretary and assistant secretary to the governor for energy and environment; and senior legislative counsel/legislative counsel in the New York State Office of Federal Affairs. His experience includes the development and implementation of major energy and environmental initiatives and programs for New York State, including the development of a comprehensive, integrated State Energy Plan that integrated state energy, environmental, and economic development policies in the early 1990s, and policy analysis for the federal government on electric reliability and appliance efficiency standards. He was an environmental policy fellow at the Institute of Ecosystems, Millbrook, New York (1999-2000); director, Scenic Hudson, Inc. (1994-2000); director, the Environmentors Project (Washington, D.C., 1994-2000); and founding member of the Hudson River Greenway Communities Council (1992-1996). He has a B.S.F.S. from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service and a J.D. degree from the Georgetown University Law Center. D. Louis Peoples is president and founder of Nyack Management Company, a business consulting and turnaround firm. Formerly he was chief executive officer of Orange and Rockland Utilities in New York State. While at Orange and

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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs Rockland, he was a leader in the deregulation of electric power, serving as chairman of the New York Power Pool and of the Transition Steering Committee to form the New York Independent System Operator. Earlier, he was executive vice president of Madison Gas and Electric Company; senior vice president of RCG/Hagler, Bailly, a consulting company; and vice president of Bechtel Management Consulting Services. Mr. Peoples has also been corporate controller of McGraw Edison Company, director of nuclear licensing at Commonwealth Edison, and training manager at Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Corporation. He served in the nuclear submarine service in the U.S. Navy. He received a B.S.M.E. from Stanford University and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. He is a certified public accountant and a registered professional engineer. William F. Quinn is founder and president of Argos Utilities LLC. Formerly he was president of Shaw Transmission and Distribution Services, Inc., part of The Shaw Group, where he had responsibility for strategic planning, business development, and the financial viability of the transmission and distribution subsidiaries. Mr. Quinn also sits on the board of directors of Hydro Power Solutions LLC, a joint venture company owned equally by The Shaw Group and Hydro Quebec LTD of Montreal. He also managed The Shaw Group’s Structured Transaction Group, where his duties included managing mergers and acquisitions teams, overseeing project development activities, and evaluating investment options. Prior to joining The Shaw Group, Mr. Quinn was responsible for management of the Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) National Energy Group’s power-asset-development business in North America. Among other projects there, Mr. Quinn directed the 1,200 MW Athens Generating Project, New York’s first merchant generating facility and one of the largest gas-fired power plants in the United States. Prior to joining PG&E, he incorporated Meridian Power Corporation, where he was responsible for the marketing, development, financing, and construction of power-generating projects. While at Energy Management, Inc., Mr. Quinn developed several biomass and gas-fired cogeneration projects. He also was project engineer for Badger America, Inc. He has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts and did graduate studies in business administration at Harvard University. He is a registered professional engineer. Dan W. Reicher is president, New Energy Capital Corporation. He served recently as executive vice president of Northern Power Systems, the nation’s oldest renewable energy company. From 1997 to 2001, Mr. Reicher was Assistant Secretary of Energy for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As Assistant Secretary, he directed annually more than $1 billion in investments in renewable energy, distributed generation, and energy-efficiency research, development, and deployment. Prior to that position, Mr. Reicher held other senior management posts in DOE and was also a senior attorney at the Natural Resources Defense Council. He was also co-chair of the U.S. Biomass Research and Development Board, a member of the U.S. delegation to the Climate Change Negotiations, and a member of the board of the government-industry Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. Mr. Reicher is also currently co-chair of the advisory board of the American Council on Renewable Energy and a member of the boards of Burrill and Company’s Biomaterials and Bio-processing Venture Fund, the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy, and the Keystone Center’s Energy Program. He has more than 20 years of experience in energy technology, policy, and finance. He holds a B.A. from Dartmouth College and a J.D. from Stanford Law School. James S. Thorp (NAE) is the Hugh P. and Ethel C. Kelly Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and head of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Previously he had been the Charles N. Mellowes Professor in Engineering at Cornell University and director of the Cornell School of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He had also been a faculty intern at the American Electric Power Service Corporation; an Overseas Fellow, Churchill College, Cambridge University; and an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation National Scholar. Dr. Thorp is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the editor of the IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery for protection systems. Dr. Thorp received the 2001 Power Engineering Society Career Service award. He was a member of the International Advisory Board of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Hong Kong University, and a member of the Iowa State Electrical and Computer Engineering External Advisory Board. He has written more than 100 journal articles and many book chapters. He obtained a B.E.E. and Ph.D. from Cornell University. John A. Tillinghast (NAE) is president of Tillinghast Technology Interests, Inc. Early in his career from 1949 to 1979, he held a number of positions at American Electric Power (AEP) Service Corporation, including executive vice president, engineering and construction, and vice chairman of the board in charge of engineering and construction. Positions that he held subsequent to his employment at AEP include senior vice president and senior technical officer overseeing research and development of Technology Wheelabrator-Frye, Inc.; senior vice president, technology, Signal Advanced Technology Group, The Signal Companies, Inc; and senior vice president, Science Applications International Corporation. His experience and knowledge span a variety of areas, including steam turbines; nuclear energy systems; magnetohydrodynamic power plants; fossil energy power plants; transmission and distribution (T&D) systems; engineering, construction, and operation of electric power pro-

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Alternatives to the Indian Point Energy Center for Meeting New York Electric Power Needs duction and T&D facilities; restructuring of the utility industry; alternative energy projects; cogeneration including small gas turbines; geothermal plants; life extension of utility facilities; and power marketing. He has served on a number of National Research Council units, including as chairman of the Energy Engineering Board and as a member of the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has a B.S. and M.S. in mechanical engineering from Columbia University.