APPENDIX D-1
COST ESTIMATES FOR ELECTRIC GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES

Parker Mathusa and Erin Hogan1

TABLE D-1-1 Summary Cost Estimates: Total Cost of Electricity (in 2003 U.S. dollars per kilowatt-hour) for Generating Technologies Examined by the Committee

 

Costs Estimated by:

Technology

EIAa

University of Chicagob

MITc

Municipal solid waste landfill gas

0.0352

 

 

Scrubbed coal, new (pulverized)

0.0382

0.0357

0.0447

Fluidized-bed coal

 

0.0358

 

Pulverized coal, supercritical

 

0.0376

 

Integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC)

0.0400

0.0346

 

Advanced nuclear

0.0422

0.0433

0.0711

Advanced gas combined cycle

0.0412

0.0354

0.0416

Conventional gas combined cycle

0.0435

 

 

Wind 100 MW

0.0566

 

 

Advanced combustion turbine

0.0532

 

 

IGCC with carbon sequestration

0.0595

 

 

Wind 50 MW

0.0598

 

 

Conventional combustion turbine

0.0582

 

 

Advanced combined cycle with carbon sequestration

0.0641

 

 

Biomass

0.0721

 

 

Distributed generation, base

0.0501

 

 

Distributed generation, peak

0.0452

 

 

Wind 10 MW

0.0991

 

 

Photovoltaic

0.2545

 

 

Solar thermal

0.3028

 

 

NOTE: EIA: Energy Information Administration; MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Data exclude regional multipliers for capital, variable operation and maintenance (O&M), and fixed O&M. New York costs would be higher. Data exclude delivery costs. Data reflect fuel prices that are New York State-specific; see Table D-1-7. Costs reflect units of different sizes; while some technologies have lower costs than others, the total capacity of the lower-cost generation technology may be limited—for example, a 500-MW municipal solid waste landfill gas project is unlikely. MIT calculations assumed a 10-year term; consequently, estimated costs are higher.

aFor EIA data, see Table D-1-3 in this appendix, column “Total Cost of Energy ($/kWh).” Annual Energy Outlook 2005, Basis of Assumptions, Table 38. The 0.6 rule was applied to the wind 10 MW and 100 MW units using 50 MW as the base reference. Solar thermal costs exclude the 10 percent investment tax credit.

bFor University of Chicago data, see Tables D-1-5 and D-1-6 in this appendix.

cFor MIT data, see Table D-1-2 in this appendix.

1

Parker Mathusa is a member of the Committee on Alternatives to Indian Point for Meeting Energy Needs. Erin Hogan is with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.



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