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Appendix A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Dr. James M. Coleman (Chair) received his Ph.D. in geology from Louisi- ana State University in 1966. He is the Boyd Professor for the Coastal Studies Institute of Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Me- chanical College. Dr. Coleman is a former commissioner of the U.S. Com- mission on Ocean Policy, former chairman of the Marine Board, and former member of the Ocean Studies Board. He has served on many National Research Council committees. He is a member of the U.S. Na- tional Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences. His research interests include coastal and marine processes and coastal management. He has received many awards in his nearly 40-year scientific career, including the Kapitsa Medal of Honor for his contribu- tions to the field of petroleum sciences. Mr. Robert J. Bailey earned his B.Sc. in earth science from Portland State University in 1968. He is manager of the Ocean and Coastal Services Division of the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Develop- ment, Oregon's land-planning agency. Some of his duties include advis- ing the Office of the Governor on matters of coastal and ocean policy, and program administration; representing the State of Oregon's coastal zone management interests during collaborations with federal agencies; and administering Oregon's Coastal Zone Management grant program (fed- erally funded annually at $2 million). Mr. Bailey has also worked for several years as a land-use planner. Currently, he is the elected commis- 101

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102 APPENDIX A sioner of the City of Oregon City. From 2001 to 2003, he was a he member of the City of Oregon City Planning Commission. Dr. Billy J. (B.J.) Copeland received a Ph.D. from Oklahoma State Uni- versity in 1963. He is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Zoology, North Carolina State University (NCSU). During his tenure at NCSU, he also functioned as Director of the North Carolina Sea Grant College from 1973 to 1996. His research interests include coastal ecology, water quality, habitat conservation, fisheries management, and natural resources devel- opment and conservation. Dr. Copeland served on the NRC National Science Foundation Graduate Panel on Biological Sciences. He has also served on numerous boards, committees, task forces, and commissions in the area of coastal and marine water quality and fisheries management. Aside from these activities, Dr. Copeland has authored roughly 150 ar- ticles, reports, book chapters and complete texts on matters related to coastal ecology. Currently, he serves on the North Carolina Marine Fish- eries Commission. Dr. Susan E. Cozzens received her Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University. She is Professor of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and Director of its Technology Policy and Assessment Cen- ter. Dr. Cozzens has served on four NRC committees, including the Com- mittee for Assessment of Centers of Excellence Programs at NIH and the Committee to Study the National Science Foundation Decisionmaking on Major Awards. Dr. Cozzens is the author of numerous articles in science policy and science and technology studies, and several books, including Social Control and Multiple Discovery in Science: The Opiate Receptor Case (SUNY Press, 1990), and Theories of Science in Society (coeditor with Tho- mas F. Gieryn; Indiana University Press, 1991). She is past editor of both Science, Technology, & Human Values, and Society for Social Studies of Science and current editor of Research Evaluation. Dr. Cozzens has served as a consultant to numerous organizations, including the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the National Science Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. From 1995 through 1997, Dr. Cozzens was Director of the Office of Policy Support at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Keith R. Criddle received his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of California, Davis in 1989. He currently serves as the Ted Stevens Distinguished Professorship of Marine Policy at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. He was previously on the faculty in the Economics Departments of both at Utah State University in Logan, Utah, and at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. Dr. Criddle's research focuses on the intersection between the natural sciences and economics, especially the

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APPENDIX A 103 management of living resources. In particular, he has explored topics ranging from the economic impact of sport fishing in Cook Inlet, Alaska, to governance structures for fisheries management. Other research areas include sustainable fisheries management, fishery revenue maximiza- tions, and evolution of the structure of the Chilean salmon aquaculture industry in response to requirements for traceability and assurance. Dr. Criddle served as the associate editor of Marine Resource Economics from 19932003 and as a member of the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council Scientific and Statistical Committee from 1993-present. He was a member of the NRC Committee on the Introduction of Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay and on the NRC Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas. Dr. Eliezer Geisler earned his Ph.D. from Northwestern University. He is Professor and Associate Dean at the Stuart Graduate School of Business of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Dr. Geisler is a leading scholar of the management of research, science and technology, and in knowledge man- agement systems. He specializes in the management of healthcare and medical technology. His research, published in eight books and more than 100 scholarly articles, has contributed fundamental and innovative ideas that have significantly influenced the study of technology, R&D, science and knowledge in industry, universities and government, in the areas of technology alliances, entrepreneurship, commercialization of re- search, and technology transfer. In particular, Dr. Geisler is a leading scholar in the development of metrics for the evaluation of science and technology, and four of his books evaluate the impact of science. Dr. Michael W. Howell earned his Ph.D. in marine science from the University of South Carolina and his M.S. in oceanic science from the University of Michigan. He is an associate professor at the University of South Florida; his research involves the use of deep-sea sediments to understand ocean and climate history through geological time. The paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic history of the Mediterranean Sea has been a major focus area of this work. Dr. Howell currently serves on the State of South Carolina Governor's Mathematics and Science Advi- sory Board, the American Geological Institute Minority Participation Pro- gram Advisory Committee, the Governing Board for the South Carolina Alliance for Minority Participation, the American Geophysical Union's Subcommittee on Diversity, and the Industrial Liaison Panel of the Inte- grated Ocean Drilling Program. Dr. Howell has served regularly on the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Re- sources, with a concentration in the Division of Elementary, Secondary, and Informal Education.

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104 APPENDIX A Mr. Richard C. Karney earned his B.Sc. in biological sciences from Rutgers University. Since 1976, he has been Shellfish Biologist and Director of the Martha's Vineyard Shellfish Group, Inc., a nonprofit consortium of the shellfish departments of six towns on Martha's Vineyard. Prior to 1976, Mr. Karney worked for the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. During his tenure at Martha's Vineyard Shellfish Group, he has carried out a successful community-based resource development program for the com- mercially important shellfish species on Martha's Vineyard. Management efforts have concentrated on the development of hatchery and field aquac- ulture methods for shellfish and the operation of the nation's first public solar shellfish hatchery. In the mid 1990's, with a $500,000 National Ma- rine Fisheries Service grant, Mr. Karney conducted a shellfish aquaculture retraining program for fishermen displaced by fishing closures on Georges Bank. He is presently assisting the fishermen with marketing cultured oysters. Mr. Karney is also cochair of the National Shellfisheries Associa- tion Industry Subcommittee and cochair of the Southeast Massachusetts Aquaculture Center. Dr. George I. Matsumoto received his Ph.D. in biological sciences from the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1990. Since 1996, he has been the Senior Educational and Research Specialist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), Moss Landing, California. Dr. Matsumoto's research interests include open ocean and deep-sea commu- nities; ecology and biogeography of open ocean and deep sea organisms; functional morphology, and natural history and behavior. In addition to research, his other responsibilities include managing several education and outreach efforts, including collaborations with MBARI's sister orga- nization, the Monterey Bay Aquarium. Dr. Matsumoto served on the Digi- tal Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) Steering Committee and the 2004 NSF Committee of Visitors for Geoscience Education and is cur- rently serving on the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) National Advisory Board as well as Chair of the Ocean Research Interactive Observatory Networks (ORION) Education and Public Aware- ness Committee. Dr. Joan Bray Rose received her Ph.D. in microbiology from the Univer- sity of Arizona in 1985, and an M.S. in microbiology from the University of Wyoming in 1980. She joined the University of South Florida in April of 1989, first as associate and then as full professor, and recently accepted the Homer Nowlin Endowed Chair in Water Research at Michigan State University. Dr. Rose is an international expert in water pollution microbi- ology, waterborne disease, and public policy and health policy issues. Her research includes studies on waterborne diseases and microbial risk

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APPENDIX A 105 assessment. Her prior NRC service includes membership on the Water Science and Technology Board and the Board on Life Sciences and seven NRC committees. Dr. Rose is currently a member of the Science Advisory Board of the International Great Lakes Commission. She served as vice chair of the U.S. National Committee of the International Water Associa- tion from 2002 to 2004. Dr. Andrew R. Solow earned his Ph.D. in geostatistics from Stanford University in 1986. He is Senior Scientist and Director of the Marine Policy Center at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Dr. Solow's research experience involves environmental statistics, time-series analysis, spatial statistics, Bayesian methods, statistical biology, and ecology. He has authored some 150 scientific publications on topics including biological diversity, El Nio, and empirical analysis of volcanic eruptions. Dr. Solow is a former member of the NRC Commission on Geosciences, Environ- ment, and Resources. He is currently serving on the Committee to Review the U.S. Ocean Research Priorities Plan and the Committee on Extending Observations and Research Results to Practical Applications: A Review of NASA's Approach. Dr. Fred N. Spiess received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley in 1951. He is currently a professor of oceanography, professor emeritus and research professor at Scripps Institution of Ocean- ography, University of California, San Diego. Dr. Spiess joined the Marine Physical Laboratory at Scripps in 1952 and began his research career in underwater acoustics and sonar systems. His interests include ocean en- gineering and related seagoing marine geophysics and graduate stu- dent education. From 1980 to 1988, Dr. Spiess was director of the Univer- sity of California Institute of Marine Resources and was responsible for the administration of the California Sea Grant Program. Dr. Spiess has been a member of the National Academy of Engineering since 1985 as well as a member of the Ocean Studies Board. He has served on several NRC committees. Among other awards, Dr. Spiess holds the American Geophysical Union Ewing Medal and the Acoustical Society of America's Pioneers of Underwater Acoustics Medal. NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF Dr. Dan Walker joined the National Research Council's Ocean Studies Board (OSB) as a program officer in July of 1995 and was named a National Academies' Scholar in 2005. Dr. Walker received his Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Tennessee in 1990. Prior to joining the OSB, Dan conducted research focused on the tectonic evolution of rifted

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106 APPENDIX A continental margins, with an emphasis on natural resource (oil and gas) development and low-level radioactive waste disposal. Since joining the OSB, Dr. Walker has staffed nearly two dozen NRC studies, includ- ing Earth Science and Applications from Space, Protecting and Restoring Coastal Louisiana, Evaluating the Sea Grant Review Process, Understanding Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects; Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates, and Effects; Future Needs in Deep Submergence Science: Occupied and Unoccupied Vehicles in Basic Ocean Research; Environmental Information for Naval War- fare; Clean Coastal Waters: Understanding and Reducing the Effect of Nutrient Pollution; Science for Decisionmaking: Coastal and Marine Geology at the U.S. Geological Survey; Global Ocean Science: Toward an Integrated Approach. Dr. Walker also directs the board's Engineering and Technology Subcom- mittee. He is also a guest investigator at the Marine Policy Center of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and editor of the Marine Tech- nology Society Journal. Dr. Jennifer Merrill was a Senior Program Officer at the Ocean Studies Board from 2001 to 2005. She received her Ph.D. in Marine and Estuarine Environmental Science from the University of Maryland Center for Envi- ronmental Science, Horn Point Laboratory. Dr. Merrill served as a NOAA Knauss Marine Policy Fellow in the office of Senator Carl Levin, lectured at University of Maryland, and worked as a project manager at Maryland Sea Grant. At the OSB she directed studies that produced the reports Marine Biotechnology in the Twenty-first Century: Problems, Promise, and Prod- ucts (2002), Ocean Noise and Marine Mammals (2003), Exploration of the Seas: Voyage into the Unknown (2003), and Marine Mammal Populations and Ocean Noise: Determining When Noise Causes Biologically Significant Effects. Dr. Merrill also assisted on the reports Oil in the Sea III: Inputs, Fates, and Effects (2003), and Charting the Future of Methane Hydrates in the United States (2004). Ms. Amanda L. Babson was a National Academies Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the Ocean Studies Board. Ms. Babson expects to be awarded her Ph.D. in Oceanography from the Uni- versity of Washington in 2006. Ms. Babson received her B.A. in Physics from Carleton College in 1998. Ms. Nancy Caputo is a research associate at the Ocean Studies Board, where she has worked since 2001. Ms. Caputo received an M.P.P. (Master of Public Policy) from the University of Southern California and a B.A. in political science/international relations from the University of California at Santa Barbara. Her interests include marine policy, science, and educa- tion. During her tenure with OSB, Ms. Caputo has assisted with the

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APPENDIX A 107 completion of seven reports: A Review of the Florida Keys Carrying Capacity Study (2002); Emulsified Fuels--Risks and Response (2002); Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters--Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003); Enabling Ocean Research in the 21st Century: Implementation of a Net- work of Ocean Observatories (2003); River Basins and Coastal Systems Plan- ning Within the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (2004); Charting the Future of Methane Hydrate Research in United States (2004); Dynamic Changes in Ma- rine Ecosystems: Fishing, Food Webs, and Future Options (2006). She is also the assistant editor of Oceanography, the professional magazine of The Oceanography Society.

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