Click for next page ( 162


The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 161
III APPENDIXES

OCR for page 161

OCR for page 161
Appendix A Biographies of Speakers* MARK E. DOMS Mark E. Doms is senior economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. His research interests include diffusion of IT technology and effects on firm performance and shifts in IT investment. He is currently beginning a rather large project examining the relationship between technology use and firm performance. This study will use a very large data set on technology use at the establishment level between 1980 and 2002. The study will first examine the diffusion of IT technologies over the past several decades, then examine the rela- tionship between the adoption of various IT technologies and firm performance for a sample of publicly traded companies. Dr. Doms also is examining models of IT investment at the national level; this involves testing the various hypotheses surrounding the 1990s surge and 2001 sharp drop in IT investment. Among Dr. Doms' published work are "How Fast Do Personal Computers Depreciate? Concepts and New Estimates" (with Wendy E. Dunn, Stephen D. Oliner, and Daniel E. Sichel. FRBSF Working Paper 2003-20. November); "IT Investment and Firm Performance in U.S. Retail Trade" (with Ron S. Jarmin, and Shawn D. Klimek. FRBSF Working Paper 2003-19 November); and "Understand- *As of November 2004. 163

OCR for page 161
164 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE ing Productivity: Lessons from Longitudinal Microdata" (with Erik Bartelsman, Journal of Economic Literature, September, pp. 569594, September 2000) as well as other articles appearing in journals such as Review of Economic Dynamics, Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Economic Inquiry, and International Journal of Industrial Organization. Mark Doms received a B.A. from the University of Maryland and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin. CHARLES H. FERGUSON Charles H. Ferguson is a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution and an independent computer consultant. He is author of The Broadband Problem: Anatomy of a Market Failure and a Policy Dilemma (Brookings Institution Press, 2004), High Stakes, No Prisoners: A Winner's Talk of Greed and Glory in the Internet Wars (Times Books, 1999) and coauthor with Charles R. Morris of Computer Wars: The Fall of IBM and the Future of Global Technology (Random House, 1993). He founded and served as CEO of Vermeer Technologies, the company responsible for developing FrontPage. He received a Ph.D. in political science from MIT. KENNETH FLAMM Kenneth Flamm is Professor and Dean Rusk Chair in International Affairs at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UTAustin. He is a 1973 honors graduate of Stanford University and received a Ph.D. in economics from M.I.T. in 1979. From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Flamm served as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Economic Security and Special Assistant to the Deputy Secretary of Defense for Dual Use Technology Policy. Prior to and after his service at the Defense Department, he spent eleven years as a Senior Fellow in the Foreign Policy Studies Program at Brookings. Dr. Flamm has been a professor of eco- nomics at the Instituto Tecnolgico A. de Mxico in Mexico City, the University of Massachusetts, and George Washington University. Dr. Flamm currently directs the LBJ School's Technology and Public Policy Program, and directs externally funded research projects on "Internet Use in Developing and Industrializing Countries." "The Economics of Fair Use," and "Determinants of Internet Use in U.S. Households," and has recently initiated a new project on "Exploring the Digital Divide: Regional Differences in Patterns of Internet Use in the U.S." He continues to work with semiconductor industry re- search consortium International SEMATECH, and is building a return-on- investment-based prototype to add economic logic to SEMATECH's industry investment model. He also is a member of the National Academy of Science's Panel on The Future of Supercomputing, and its Committee on Measuring and Sustaining the New Economy. He has served as member and Chair of the NATO

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 165 Science Committee's Panel for Science and Technology Policy and Organiza- tion, and as a member of the Federal Networking Council Advisory Committee, the OECD's Expert Working Party on High Performance Computers and Com- munications, and various advisory committees and study groups of the National Science Foundation, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Defense Science Board, and the U.S. Congress' Office of Technology Assessment, and as a consultant to government agencies, international organizations, and private corporations. Dr. Flamm is the author of numerous articles and books on the economic impacts of technological innovation in a variety of high technology industries. Among the latter are Mismanaged Trade? Strategic Policy and the Semiconductor Industry (1996), Changing the Rules: Technological Change, International Com- petition, and Regulation in Communications (ed., with Robert Crandell, 1989), Creating the Computer (1988), and Targeting the Computer (1987). Recent work by Flamm has focused on measurement of the economic impact of the semi- conductor industry on the U.S. economy, analyzing the economic determinants of Internet use by households, and assessing the economic impacts of Internet use in key applications. LISA A. HOOK As president of AOL Broadband, Premium & Developer Services, Lisa A. Hook oversaw AOL's drive to offer the premier broadband experience to AOL members. AOL for Broadband develops, markets, and operates AOL's high-speed line of business with more than 2.5 million subscribers, as of September 30, 2003. In addition, Ms. Hook led the Premium Services organization, which devel- ops, launches, and operates new subscription services. Working in tandem with AOL's marketing organization, the Premium Services group works across AOL to define and quickly deploy services that bring even greater value to members' online experience. Ms. Hook's responsibilities also included oversight of AOL's Platform Services initiative that develops the next-generation platform strategy needed to launch new technologies in a scalable manner, including concerns such as trans- actions and authentication. Formerly, Ms. Hook served as president of AOL Anywhere. In this role, she directed strategy and oversaw daily operations for the company's fast-growing Anywhere division and its mobile and voice services and non-PC devices. She also was responsible for new initiatives and partnerships to bring AOL's hallmark convenience and ease-of-use to online consumers beyond the PC worldwide. A widely respected veteran of the telecommunications and media business, Ms. Hook joined AOL in 2000 as senior vice president of AOL Mobile and served as senior vice president and chief operating officer of that division before she was named president of AOL Anywhere.

OCR for page 161
166 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE Prior to joining the company, Ms. Hook was a partner at Brera Capital Partners LLC, a private equity firm focused on investing in media and tele- communications. Hook also has served as executive vice president and chief operating officer of Time Warner Telecommunications and later was vice president of Time Warner, Inc. managing various telecom-related transactions and operat- ing matters. At Time Warner, she established the company's cellular and paging resale business and built its first successful retail outlets for cellular, paging, and cable services. Ms. Hook initially joined Time Warner in 1989 as special advisor to the vice chairman of Time Warner Inc. In this position, she developed and oversaw inter- national joint ventures including the acquisition of cable systems and the launch of theatre and cable services in Europe. Earlier in her career, Ms. Hook served as legal advisor to the chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. Before that, she served as senior attorney at Viacom International Inc., where she oversaw the legal department of Viacom's cable division. Ms. Hook was also an associate with the law firm of Hogan & Hartson in Washington, D.C. Ms. Hook is a director of National Geographic Ventures and a member of the Board of Trustees of the National Public Radio Foundation. Ms. Hook is a graduate of Duke University and the Dickinson School of Law. DAVID S. ISENBERG In 1997, David S. Isenberg wrote an essay entitled, The Rise of the Stupid Network: Why the Intelligent Network was a Good Idea Once but isn't Anymore. In it, Isenberg (then a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Labo- ratories) examined the technological bases of the existing telecom business model, laid out how the communications business would be changed by new tech- nologies, foresaw today's cataclysms, and imagined tomorrow's new network. Tom Evslin, a senior AT&T executive at that time, told The Wall Street Journal that The Rise of the Stupid Network, "was like a glass of cold water in the face" of AT&T's leaders. The Wall Street Journal called the essay "scathing . . . startling," and said, "it may soon assume cult status among the tech mavens that roam the World Wide Web." Communications Week International said that the essay "challenged the most sacred assumptions of the telecom world." The Gilder Technology Report said it was "a stirring call." Inevitably, the essay found wider acceptance outside of AT&T than within it. So in 1998, Isenberg left AT&T to found isen.com, inc. to help telecommunications companies understand the busi- ness implications of the newly emerging communications infrastructure. Dr. Isenberg's public delivery of the Stupid Network message is passionate and personal. He has spoken to over 100 audiences on three continents. For example, he has spoken numerous times at George Gilder's Telecosm, at Jeff

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 167 Pulver's Voice on the Net, at Kevin Werbach's SuperNova, at John McQuillan's Next Generation Networks, at the Canadian Advanced Network Research (CANARIE) annual meeting, at Merrill Lynch and Chase Bank telecom investor meetings, at the International Institute of Communications, at the Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference (APRICOT), at the Optoelectronics Industry Development Association (OIDA) annual conference, at the Fiber to the Home Council's first annual meeting, and at numerous private management, customer, investor, and technology events. Dr. Isenberg has been cited and quoted in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Forbes, Fortune, Wired, Business 2.0, Communica- tions Week International, Network World, Release 1.0, Gilder Technology Report, TheStreet.com, Nikkei Communications, and numerous other publications. His story appears in at least half a dozen business books, including Telecosm by George Gilder, The New Pioneers by Tom Petzinger, and The Future of Ideas by Lawrence Lessig. Dr. Isenberg has written articles for Fortune, USA Today, IEEE Spectrum, MSNBC, Communications Week International, Light Reading, Business 2.0, America's Network, VON Magazine, and ACM Networker. Isenberg advises a number of new telecommunications companies and their investors. He serves as a member of TechBrains (the Merrill Lynch technology strategy advisory board). He sits on advisory boards of CallWave, LaunchCyte, Broadband Physics, Terabeam, and YottaYotta. Dr. Isenberg is a fellow of Glocom, the Institute for Global Communications of the International University of Japan. He is a founding advisor of the World Technology Network. He was a judge of the World Communications Awards in 1999 and 2001. In his 12-year career at AT&T (19851998), Dr. Isenberg was a distinguished member of Technical Staff with AT&T Labs Research, the part of Bell Labs that stayed with AT&T after the 1996 "trivestiture." Before that, he held AT&T Bell Labs technical positions in Consumer Long Distance, in Network Services, and in the PBX business unit. Before AT&T, Dr. Isenberg was employed by Mattel and Verbex, and did consulting work in voice processing for Milton Bradley, National Semiconductor, GTE Labs, and others. David Isenberg holds a Ph.D. in biology from the California Institute of Technology (1977) but also learned much science growing up in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. His upbringing centered around two principles: (1) Research is useful, and (2) If you are going to fish, use a big hook. JEFFREY M. JAFFE Jeffrey M. Jaffe is president of Bell Labs Research and Advanced Technolo- gies for Lucent Technologies. Bell Labs, the company's global research and development arm, consists of approximately 10,000 employees in 10 countries.

OCR for page 161
168 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE As president of Bell Labs Research, Dr. Jaffe supports basic research to advance science and technology in areas of importance to Lucent. Advanced Technologies works with Lucent's business units in the commercial development and deployment of new technologies. Prior to joining Lucent in 2000, Dr. Jaffe held a variety of executive research positions with International Business Machines (IBM) in a 20-year career, which included general manager of SecureWay Software and Corporate Vice President of Technology. Dr. Jaffe is a fellow of the IEEE and the Association of Computing Machinery. The United States government has consulted with Dr. Jaffe on numerous policy initiatives. In 1997, President Clinton appointed Dr. Jaffe to the Advisory Committee for the President's Commission for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Dr. Jaffe has chaired the Chief Technology Officer Group of the Computer Systems Policy Project (CSPP), which consists of a dozen of the top computer and telecommunications companies, and has served on The National Research Council's Computer Science & Telecommunications Board. Dr. Jaffe earned his B.S. in mathematics, a M.S. in electrical engineering, and a Ph.D. in computer science, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. DALE W. JORGENSON Dale W. Jorgenson is the Samuel W. Morris University Professor at Harvard University. He received a B.A. in economics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, in 1955 and a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard in 1959. After teaching at the University of CaliforniaBerkeley, he joined the Harvard faculty in 1969 and was appointed the Frederic Eaton Abbe Professor of Economics in 1980. He has directed the Program on Technology and Economic Policy at the Kennedy School of Government since 1984 and served as chairman of the Department of Economics from 1994 to 1997. Dr. Jorgenson has been honored with membership in the American Philo- sophical Society (1998), the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (1989), the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (1978), and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (1969). He was elected to fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (1982), the American Statistical Association (1965), and the Econometric Society (1964). He has been awarded honorary doctorates by Uppsala University (1991), the University of Oslo (1991), Keio University (2003), and the University of Mannheim (2004). Dr. Jorgenson served as president of the American Economic Association in 2000 and was named a distinguished fellow of the Association in 2001. He was a founding member of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy of the National Research Council in 1991 and has served as chairman of the Board since 1998. He also served as chairman of Section 54, Economic Sciences, of the

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 169 National Academy of Sciences from 2000 to 2003 and was president of the Econo- metric Society in 1987. Dr. Jorgenson received the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal of the Ameri- can Economic Association in 1971. This Medal is awarded every two years to an economist under forty for excellence in economic research. The citation for this award reads in part: Dale Jorgenson has left his mark with great distinction on pure economic theory (with, for example, his work on the growth of a dual economy); and equally on statistical method (with, for example, his development of estimation methods for rational distributed lags). But he is preeminently a master of the territory between economics and statistics, where both have to be applied to the study of concrete problems. His prolonged exploration of the determinants of investment spending, whatever its ultimate lessons, will certainly long stand as one of the finest examples in the marriage of theory and practice in economics. Dr. Jorgenson has conducted groundbreaking research on information tech- nology and economic growth, energy and the environment, tax policy and invest- ment behavior, and applied econometrics. He is the author of 232 articles in economics and the author and editor of twenty-four books. His collected papers have been published in ten volumes by The MIT Press, beginning in 1995. His most recent book, Economic Growth in the Information Age, was published by The MIT Press in 2002 and represents the first major effort to quantify the impact of information technology on the U.S. economy. Another recent MIT Press vol- ume, Lifting the Burden: Tax Reform, the Cost of Capital, and U.S. Economic Growth, co-authored with Kun-Young Yun in 2001, proposes a new approach to capital income taxation, dubbed "A Smarter Type of Tax" by the Financial Times. Forty-three economists have collaborated with Dr. Jorgenson on published research. Many of Dr. Jorgenson's books and papers have been co-authored with students in economics at Berkeley and Harvard. Among his former students are professors at leading academic institutions in the United States and abroad and several occupy endowed chairs. The MIT Press published Econometrics and the Cost of Capital, edited by Lawrence J. Lau, in 2000. This contains essays in honor of Dr. Jorgenson presented at a conference at Harvard by thirteen of his former students. It also contains his biography, a list of his publications, and a list of his sixty-four Ph.D. thesis advisees at Berkeley and Harvard. MIKE LAJOIE Mike LaJoie is chief technology officer of Time Warner Cable. Prior to his appointment to CTO, Mr. LaJoie had been serving as the company's executive vice president of Advanced Technology since August 2002. Over the last several years, Mr. LaJoie has lead the development and deploy- ment of Time Warner Cable's extremely successful advanced digital products

OCR for page 161
170 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE including video on demand, high definition television and digital video recorders. As chief technology officer, Mr. LaJoie guides technology development across all product offerings at the company. He also charts the course for the continuing evolution of the company's digital platform and technological infrastructure. Mr. LaJoie continues to build on his responsibility for new technology develop- ment, set-top advances and industry standards activities, such as OCAP and DOCSIS, while driving to keep Time Warner Cable in its position as technology leader within the industry. Mr. LaJoie served as vice president of Corporate Development from 1998 through 2002, where he oversaw the development of VOD software and set-top boxes and other major launches of new services and products. Mr. LaJoie has been involved in many development projects over his 16 years working with the com- pany, including its Multi Media initiative, The Full Service Network, Road Runner, Pegasus Digital Television platform, and the company's early work in IP telephony. Prior to joining Time Warner Cable, Mr. LaJoie was an independent software developer and designed and installed network systems. Earlier in his career he was a NASDAQ Broker/Dealer and a Series 7 Registered Securities Representative. DAVID LIPPKE David Lippke, president of HighSpeed America, has over two decades of intensive, industry-leading experience in technology development and manage- ment. Mr. Lippke is particularly well known for his openness, the strength of his inter-organizational relationships, and his desire to understand others' perspectives. Mr. Lippke joined America Online (AOL) in 1993 where he led the develop- ment of the company's core infrastructures, scaling mechanisms, and key appli- cations for nine years. Early in his AOL career, Mr. Lippke developed AOL's scalable architecture including the architecture and implementation of AOL Instant MessengerTM, a high-performance messaging fabric architected in 1996 to support the two orders of magnitude growth represented by the nine million simultaneous user load experienced now. Mr. Lippke most recently served as AOL's senior vice president for Systems Infrastructure leading a nationwide engineering organization of some 9,000 employees with primary responsibility for the company's host-based products; systems and connectivity infrastructures; as well as its advertising, publishing, and content-tracking systems. LOUIS MAMAKOS Louis Mamakos, chief technology officer, oversees all technology functions at Vonage, which includes new product and services development, supervision of all research projects and integration of all technology-based activities into Vonage's corporate strategy.

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 171 Mr. Mamakos has more than 20 years of experience in Internet technical engineering and architecture for large scale, commercial IP backbone networks. Most recently, Mr. Mamakos served as a fellow for Hyperchip, Inc., a start-up that built scalable, high-performance core routers. Prior to Hyperchip, Mr. Mamakos held various engineering and architecture positions during his eight years at UUNET Technologies, now known as MCI. Prior to UUNET Technologies, Mr. Mamakos spent nearly twelve years as Assistant Manager for Network Infra- structure at the University of Maryland, College Park. Mr. Mamakos holds a B.S. in computer science from University of Mary- land--College Park. STEVEN J. METALITZ Steven J. Metalitz is a Partner in the Washington, D.C. law firm of Smith & Metalitz, LLP. He specializes in intellectual property, privacy, e-commerce and information law. He provides legal counseling and policy advocacy, primarily for clients in the publishing, recording, motion picture, software and database indus- tries, and for e-commerce companies. For the past decade, Mr. Metalitz has represented the main coalitions of the copyright industry sector on key public policy issues. For example, as counsel to the Creative Incentive Coalition, Mr. Metalitz was closely involved in the draft- ing and enactment of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998, and since then he has represented a copyright industry coalition on DMCA implementation matters. He also serves as senior vice president of the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA), the coalition of copyright industry trade associations working for stronger copyright protection and enforcement around the world, including ratification and implementation of the WIPO Internet treaties. He has been counsel to the Copyright Coalition on Domain Names (CCDN) since its establishment in 1999, and has been an officer of the Intellectual Property Con- stituency of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) since its inception, including two terms as president. From 19891994, Mr. Metalitz was vice president and general counsel of the Information Industry Association, directing the trade association's government relations program and developing and advocating its policy positions in copy- right, telecommunications, privacy, government information policy, and other areas. From 19821989, he held several senior staff positions with the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, including chief nominations counsel, and chief counsel and staff director of its Subcommittee on Patents, Copyright and Trademarks. He also served as legislative director to Senator Charles McCurdy Mathias, Jr. (R-MD). Before his government service, Mr. Metalitz practiced law in Charleston, South Carolina. Mr. Metalitz is a member of the bar in the District of Columbia and South Carolina (inactive). He has taught copyright law as professorial lecturer in law at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., and

OCR for page 161
172 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE has published widely on copyright and Internet law topics. He is a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Chicago (B.A. 1972) and earned his law degree at Georgetown University Law Center (J.D. 1977). CHERRY A. MURRAY Cherry A. Murray, Research Strategy, Wireless and Physical Sciences Research senior vice president at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, is a physicist recognized for her work in surface physics, light scattering, and com- plex fluids. She is best known for her imaging work in phase transitions of colloi- dal systems. Dr. Murray was born in 1952 in Ft. Riley Kansas into an Army and then Foreign Service family, and spent her childhood traveling around the world, moving on the average of once per year. After receiving a B.S. and Ph.D in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, she was hired into Bell Labs as a Member of Technical Staff in 1978. Dr. Murray became a distinguished member of Technical Staff at Bell Labs in 1985. She has numerous publications and two patents. At Bell Labs, Dr. Murray was promoted to department head of the Low Temperature Physics Department in 1987 and served as department head of the Condensed Matter Physics, and then Semiconductor Physics Departments until 1997, when she was promoted to director, Physical Research Lab. She is proud of managing the 40Gb/s electronics group and the invention and development of the optical fabric for the first all-optical crossconnect for telecommunications net- works, Lucent's Wavestar LambdaRouter. She was promoted to Physical Sciences senior vice president in April 2000, and assumed her present responsibilities in October 2001. In this position, Dr. Murray has responsibility for the strategy of all Bell Labs Research and also Bell Labs Research Business Development. She also manages the Wireless and Physical Research Labs, and is responsible for the relationship of Bell Labs Research with Lucent's largest business unit, Mobility Solutions. Dr. Murray is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Art and Sciences. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Chemical Society, the Optical Society of America, the Materials Research Society, and Sigma Xi. She won the APS Maria Goeppert-Mayer Award in 1989. She sits on numerous advisory committees and boards, including the National Sciences Resource Center, dedicated to the propagation of inquiry-based science education. She is currently a General Councilor of the American Physical Society, a councilor of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Research Council, and the University of Chicago Board of Governors of Argonne National Laboratory. She also serves on the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee for the Depart- ment of Energy.

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 173 MARK B. MYERS Mark B. Myers is visiting executive professor in the Management Depart- ment at the Wharton Business School, the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on tech- nology identification and selection, product development and technology compe- tencies. Dr. Myers serves on the Science, Technology and Economic Policy Board of the National Research Council and currently co-chairs with Richard Levin, the President of Yale, the National Research Council's study of "Intellectual Property in the Knowledge Based Economy." Dr. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 36-year career in its research and development organizations. Dr. Myers was the Senior Vice President in charge of corporate research, advanced develop- ment, systems architecture and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. His responsibilities included the corporate research centers, PARC in Palo Alto, California; Webster Center for Research & Technology near Rochester, New York; Xerox Research Centre of Canada, Mississauga, Ontario; and the Xerox Research Centre of Europe in Cambridge, UK, and Grenoble, France. During this period was a member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. Dr. Myers is chairman of the board of trustees of Earlham College and has held visiting faculty positions at the University of Rochester and at Stanford Uni- versity. He holds a bachelor's degree from Earlham College and a doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. MICHAEL R. NELSON As Director of Internet Technology and Strategy at IBM, Michael R. Nelson manages a team helping define and implement IBM's Next Generation Internet strategy (NGi). His group works with university researchers on NGi technology and shaping standards for the NGi. He is also responsible for organizing IBM's involvement in the Internet2 research consortium. He chaired the Internet Society's annual INET2002 meeting and was recently selected as the Society's Vice President for Public Policy. Prior to joining IBM in July 1998, Dr. Nelson was director for technology policy at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), an independent United States government agency that is charged with regulating interstate and inter- national communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable. There he helped craft policies to foster electronic commerce, spur development and deployment of new technologies, and improve the reliability and security of the nation's telecommunications networks. Before joining the FCC in January 1997, Dr. Nelson was special assistant for

OCR for page 161
174 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE information technology at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Here he worked with Vice President Gore and the President's Science Advisor on issues relating to the Global Information Infrastructure, including telecommunications policy, information technology, encryption, electronic com- merce, and information policy. From 1988 to 1993 Dr. Nelson served as a professional staff member for the Senate's Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, chaired by then-Sena- tor Gore. He was the lead Senate staffer for the High-Performance Computing Act. Michael Nelson has a B.S. in geology from Caltech, and a Ph.D. in geophysics from MIT. WILLIAM J. RADUCHEL William J. Raduchel is the chairman and chief executive officer of Ruckus Network bringing a broad range of business experience in the computing, Internet and media industries. Before joining Ruckus Network, Dr. Raduchel was execu- tive vice president and chief technology officer of AOL Time Warner, Inc. Prior to AOL, Dr. Raduchel served as chief strategy officer and an executive committee member for Sun Microsystems, Inc. In his eleven years at Sun, Dr. Raduchel also held positions as chief information officer, chief financial officer, acting vice president of human resources and vice president of corporate planning and development and oversaw relationships with major Japanese part- ners. In addition, he has held senior executive roles at Xerox Corporation and McGraw-Hill, Inc. Dr. Raduchel currently serves as a director of Chordiant Software, In2Books, PanelLink Cinema Partners PLC and as an adviser to its parent company, Silicon Image. Additionally, he is an adviser to Myriad International Holdings, Hyper- space Communications and Wild Tangent. Dr. Raduchel is a member of the National Advisory Board for the Salvation Army, the National Academy Committee on Internet Navigation and Domain Name Services and the Board on Science, Technology and Economic Policy of the National Academy of Sciences. Named "CTO of the Year" in 2001 by Infoworld magazine, Dr. Raduchel was a past professor of economics at Harvard University and holds several issued and pending patents. After attending Michigan Technological University, which gave him an honorary doctorate in 2002, Dr. Raduchel received his undergraduate degree in economics from Michigan State University and earned his A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in economics at Harvard. In both the fall and spring of 2003 he was the Castle Lecturer on Computer Science at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 175 ANDREW SCHUON Andrew Schuon is the president of International Music Feed. Formerly he was president of programming for Infinity Broadcasting, where he was respon- sible for group-wide programming for 183 radio stations, and president and chief executive officer of Pressplay, where he oversaw all aspects of Pressplay's opera- tions, including the launch of the online subscription service, the management of its technical operations and the overall branding and development of the service. Prior to joining Pressplay, Mr. Schuon was president and chief operating officer of Jimmy and Doug's Farmclub.com where he was responsible for over- seeing all aspects of the company's record label operations, online activities, and television programming since its launch in January 2000. Previously, Mr. Schuon was executive vice president and general manager of Warner Brothers Records, with responsibility for all creative and administrative issues including promotion, marketing, artist relations, advertising, art, sales, and production. Before his post at Warner Brothers, Mr. Schuon spent several years at MTV, Music Television, culminating in his title as executive vice president of programming. Mr. Schuon is credited with engineering the station's evolution from "video jukebox" to a fully realized "youth culture" network. He was the executive producer of the MTV Video Music Awards and the MTV Movie Awards, and created and devel- oped such programming as "Alternative Nation," "MTV Live (now TRL)," "MTV Jams," and "The MTV Beach House." Mr. Schuon also served as executive vice president of programming at VH-1 where he supervised the channel's successful re-launch. PETER A. TENHULA On April 7, 2003, Peter A. Tenhula was named acting deputy bureau chief of the FCC's Wireless Telecommunications Bureau. In this position, Mr. Tenhula oversees the Bureau's Mobility Division and its Auctions and Spectrum Access Division. Mr. Tenhula also serves as director of the FCC's Spectrum Policy Task Force where he is leading the next phase of the Task Force's mission, including the coordi- nation of spectrum policy activities within the FCC, with Congress and with the administration. He also serves on the FCC's Homeland Security Policy Council. Before taking on his current duties, Mr. Tenhula served as senior legal advisor to Chairman Michael K. Powell. He advised Chairman Powell on various issues including matters related to wireless telecommunications, spectrum policy, in- ternational communications, and national security/emergency preparedness. Mr. Tenhula joined then-Commissioner Powell's staff as a legal advisor in 1997. A 13-year FCC veteran, Mr. Tenhula started his career at the FCC in 1990 as a staff attorney in the Video Services Division of the Mass Media Bureau. From 19911995, he worked in the Administrative Law Division of the FCC's Office

OCR for page 161
176 THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS CHALLENGE of General Counsel, and from 19951997 he served as special counsel to the FCC's General Counsel. Prior to joining the Commission, Mr. Tenhula served as a legal intern with U.S. Representative Michael G. Oxley and the National Association of Broadcasters. Mr. Tenhula received a B.A. degree in telecommunications from Indiana University--Bloomington, and a law degree from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He is a member of the Missouri Bar and the Federal Commu- nications Bar Association. H. BRIAN THOMPSON Brian Thompson is the chairman and founder of iTown Communications. As a veteran senior executive of the telecommunication industry, Mr. Thompson has been instrumental in impacting the rise of competitive telecommunications both in the United States and abroad. Mr. Thompson continues to head his own private equity investment and advisory firm, Universal Telecommunications, Inc. in Vienna, Virginia, focused on both start-up companies and consolidations taking place in the information/telecommunications industries. Mr. Thompson currently serves as Chairman, Comsat International (CI), one of the largest independent telecommunications operators serving all of Latin America. He was previously Chairman and chief executive officer of Global TeleSystems Group, Inc. from March 1999 through September of 2000. He served as chairman and CEO of LCI International, leading a turnaround of the company and developing it into one of the fastest growing telecommunications companies in the United States. Subsequent to the merger of LCI with Qwest Communica- tions International Inc. in June 1998, he became vice chairman of the Board for Qwest until his resignation. Mr. Thompson was also the executive vice president of MCI Communica- tions Corporation during its formative years as a long distance service company from 1981 to 1990 with responsibility for the company's eight operating divisions, including MCI International. Mr. Thompson currently serves as a member of the board of directors of Bell Canada International Inc., ArrayComm, Inc., Axcelis Technologies, Inc., Sonus Technologies, and United Auto Group. He also serves as the U.S. co-chairman of the Global Information Infrastructure Commission, a multinational organization charting the role of the private sector in the developing global information and telecommunications infrastructure. Additionally, he is a member of the Irish Prime Minister's Ireland-America Economic Advisory Board. MARK A. WEGLEITNER Mark A. Wegleitner is senior vice president, technology, and chief technol- ogy officer (CTO) for Verizon Communications. He is responsible for technology

OCR for page 161
APPENDIX A 177 assessment, network architecture, technology planning, platform development, and laboratory infrastructure for the wireline communications business. In addi- tion, he oversees a group providing technology solutions for government and commercial customers: Federal Network Systems. In his current role, he and his organization support all business units in the management of technology matters. Prior to his current assignment, Mr. Wegleitner served as vice president, Technology & Engineering, at Bell Atlantic Network Services, where he was responsible for all technology and engineering functions. Prior to that, he was CTO at Bell Atlantic Network Services. Since joining Bell Atlantic, Mr. Wegleitner has also held a variety of other management positions in strategic planning, network architecture, technology development, information systems, research and development, broadband imple- mentation, and new services technology. Mr. Wegleitner began his career in 1972 with Bell Telephone Laboratories in local switching systems development. In 1979, he joined the exchange switching systems design organization at AT&T General Departments, where he had responsibility for the introduction of new features and services on local switching systems. In 1983, he held a brief assignment with Bell Laboratories in local switching systems engineering before transferring to Bell Atlantic. Mr. Wegleitner received a B.A. in mathematics from St. John's University, and an M.S. in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California at Berkeley.