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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Joel L. Morrison, chair, is emeritus professor in the Department of Geog- raphy at Ohio State University. Previously, he was director of Ohio State's Center for Mapping and was chief of the Geography Division of the U.S. Bureau of the Census, with a brief special assignment to the National Sci- ence Foundation in the Geography and Regional Science Program of the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Directorate. Dr. Morrison also was a senior administrator at the U.S. Geological Survey. Dr. Morrison has been active in the development of geospatial data standards, bringing together diverse efforts within the United States to create the Spatial Data Transfer Standard. As chairman of the International Cartographic Association's Commission on Spatial Data Quality, he coauthored "Elements of Spatial Data Quality." Dr. Morrison earned his B.A. cum laude from Miami Uni- versity, Oxford, Ohio, in 1962; his M.S. in geography from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1964; and his Ph.D. in Geography-Cartography with a minor in statistics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1968. He is the recipient of the Carl Mannerfeld Gold Medal from the International Cartographic Association, the Meredith Burrell Award from the Association of American Geographers, and the James Anderson Award in Applied Geography. He is a former member of the National Research Council's Mapping Sciences Committee. John S. Adams is professor of geography at the Department of Geogra- phy and professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Minnesota. He is a leading population and urban geographer of the United States and Eastern Europe, and has written extensively on the 69

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70 APPENDIX A forces that shape large metropolitan areas and their consequences for people within them. He also has been a pioneer in the spatial analysis of population data for application in state and national policy making. He has conducted policy research at the University of California, Berkeley, the Bank of America World Headquarters in San Francisco, and taught at several universities in Eastern Europe and Russia. His current research includes exploring the dynamics of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metropoli- tan region, sponsored and financed by the Minnesota Department of Transportation, the Metropolitan Council, and the University of Minnesota's Center for Transportation Studies, and carried out with a team of graduate students in geography. He received a B.A. in economics (1960) and an M.A. in economics (1962) from the University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, Minn.), and a Ph.D. in urban economic geography (1966) from the University of Minnesota. Sarah W. Bednarz is an associate professor of geography at Texas A&M University. She teaches courses on human geography, the geography of Texas, and geographic education. Her research interests focus on cogni- tive science and geography. As one of the primary authors of the National Geography Standards, she developed the materials on geographic skills and other components of the project. She also served on the team that developed the framework for the 1994 National Assessment of Educa- tional Progress Geography Assessment. She has served as the Association of American Geographers representative to the Geography Education National Implementation Project and is co-coordinator of the Texas Alli- ance for Geographic Education. For two summers Dr. Bednarz served on the staff of the Educational Technology Leadership Institute, a teacher- training project cosponsored by the National Geographic Society and IBM. She is currently a member of the geosciences team supervising a group of graduate students in spatial sciences for the NSF-funded Informational Technology in Sciences Center at Texas A&M University. She received her bachelor's degree in geography at Mount Holyoke College, Massa- chusetts, an M.A.T in geography from the University of Chicago, and com- pleted a Ph.D. at Texas A&M. Max J. Egenhofer is the director of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis at the University of Maine, the Libra Professor of the College of Engineering, professor in Spatial Information Science and Engineering, and cooperating professor in computer science. Dr. Egenhofer's research interests include spatiotemporal reasoning, user in- terfaces for geographic information systems, the design of spatial data- base systems, and mobile spatial information appliances. He has authored or coauthored articles in journals, books, and conference proceedings re-

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APPENDIX A 71 lating to GIS and computer science on various aspects of GIS design. He received an M.S. in surveying engineering from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, in 1985, and his Ph.D. from the University of Maine in surveying engineering in 1989. Mark N. Gahegan is a professor of geography and affiliate professor at the School of Information Science and Technology at The Pennsylvania State University. He has been a faculty member at The Pennsylvania State University since 1998, and his research interests include geographic infor- mation science (GIS), visualization, semantic models of geography, geocomputation, digital remote sensing, artificial intelligence tools, spa- tial analysis, Voronoi diagrams, databases, and qualitative reasoning. His editorial roles include International Journal of GIS; Transactions in GIS; Computers, Environment, and Urban Systems; and Computers & Geo- sciences. He is a technical representative to the Open Geospatial Consor- tium and associate director of the GeoVista Center at Penn State. He re- ceived his B.S. at the University of Leeds, U.K., and his Ph.D. at Curtin University, Australia. Henry L. Garie has been with the New Jersey Office of GIS, which is re- sponsible for coordinating the development and use of GIS tools and spa- tial data, since 1999. Dr. Garie previously served as executive director of Geospatial One-Stop, an e-government initiative sponsored by the federal Office of Management and Budget. In 2001, he was appointed to the New Jersey Geographic Information Council. He led a State agency GIS part- nership that included membership of all 17 cabinet-level agencies and served as chair of the New Jersey State Mapping Advisory Committee. Before being named as state GIS coordinator in 1999, he directed the GIS Program in the N.J. Department of Environmental Protection from 1986 through September 1999. Dr. Garie is a past president of the National States Geographic Information Council (1997-1998) and served on the Mapping Sciences Committee of the National Research Council (1998- 2000). He was a member of the Steering Committee for the 1999 National Geo-Data Forum and has served on numerous advisory groups working with the Federal Geographic Data Committee. He has an M.S. in environ- mental sciences from Rutgers University. Michael F. Goodchild is a professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, chair of UCSB's Center for Spatially Integrated Social Science, and chair of the Executive Committee of the National Cen- ter for Geographic Information and Analysis. He received his B.A. in phys- ics from Cambridge University and his Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University. He taught at the University of Western Ontario for

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72 APPENDIX A 19 years before moving to his present position in 1988. His research inter- ests focus on the generic issues of geographic information, including ac- curacy and the modeling of uncertainty, the design of spatial decision support systems, development of methods of spatial analysis, and data structures for global GIS. His publications include the two-volume text Geographic Information Systems: Principles and Applications. He currently is a member of the Geographical Sciences Committee and formerly served as chair of the National Research Council's Mapping Science Committee. In 2002, he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Kathleen (Kass) Green is the president of Alta Vista Company where she acts as an independent consultant on geospatial strategy, technology and policy issues to private, educational, and public organizations. She for- merly served as the president of Space Imaging Solutions, a division of Space Imaging LLC. Prior to joining Space Imaging, Ms. Green was presi- dent of Pacific Meridian Resources, a GIS consulting firm she cofounded in 1988 and sold to Space Imaging in 2000. Ms. Green's background in- cludes over 29 years of experience in natural resource policy, economics, GIS analysis, and remote sensing. She is the author of numerous articles on GIS and remote sensing and has coauthored a book on the practical aspects of accuracy assessment. Ms. Green is the current vice president of the American Society of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, and is a past president of the Management Association for Private Photogrammet- ric Surveyors, an organization of private mapping firms dedicated to ad- vancing the mapping industry. She received a B.S. in forestry and resource management from the University of California, Berkeley (1974), an M.S. in resource policy and management from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (1981), and advanced to candidacy toward her Ph.D.in wildland resource science from the University of California, Berkeley. Michael Tait joined Environmental Systems Research Institute Inc. (ESRI) in 1989 as a project manager/consultant in the Professional Services Divi- sion and is now Director of the Internet Solutions Division. He is respon- sible for the development of ESRI's ArcIMS product and Geography Net- work development activities and oversees a staff of software programmers and product specialists that is responsible for design, development, and release of ESRI's ArcIMS software products. Prior to joining ESRI, Mr. Tait worked for the Planning Department for the City of Austin, Texas (1985-1989). He is skilled in GIS/database application development, data- base development and management, data model design and develop- ment, and data applications programming and implementation. He re- ceived a B.A. in geography and an M.S. in community and regional

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APPENDIX A 73 planning with an emphasis in planning information systems from the University of Texas at Austin. Nancy Tosta, vice president of Ross & Associates Environmental Con- sulting Ltd. in Seattle, Washington, has over 25 years of experience man- aging and providing leadership on international, national, state, local, in- tergovernmental, and regional initiatives to use, integrate, and coordinate technology for addressing human and natural resource management is- sues. She has expertise in policy formulation and standards, intergovern- mental and interagency technology initiatives, organizational change management, funding and research strategies, information integration and dissemination, and GIS needs assessments and applications. Prior to working in the private sector, she was the special assistant to the secretary for geographic data coordination, Department of the Interior; chief/staff director, USGS National Mapping Division; and deputy director, State of California Teale Data Center. Ms. Tosta received her M.S. in soil science (1976) and B.S. in soils and plant nutrition (1974) from the University of California, Berkeley. David Unwin is currently visiting professor at the University College London Department of Geomatic Engineering. He was previously learn- ing programmes director at U.K. eUniversities Worldwide Ltd., chair in the School of Geography at Birkbeck College, University of London, En- gland, and pro-vice master of the college with special responsibility for communications and information technology. He was an early pioneer in the United Kingdom of the application of computing to geographic prob- lems and to geographic education. In 1989 he was the founding director of the Computers in Teaching Initiative Centre for Geography. Over the past 25 years, he has served on various committees of the Royal Geographical Society and the Geographical Association. He is also a past council and management committee member of the Association for Geographic Infor- mation. Professor Unwin has led or co-led a number of major GI research projects. From 1989 to 1993 he was assistant director of the U.K. Economic and Social Research Council's Midland's Regional Research Laboratory at Leicester University. He has developed tools for the visualization of geo- graphic data and for use in the development of virtual field courses. He has also developed tools for the characterization of urban surfaces in physically meaningful terms for inputs into urban climate models. He re- ceived a B.S. from the University of London (1965) and a master's degree in philosophy from the University of London (1970).

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74 APPENDIX A NRC Staff Ronald F. Abler is currently a senior scientist at the National Academies and secretary general and treasurer of the International Geographical Union. He was executive director of the Association of American Geogra- phers from 1989 through 2002 and professor of geography at The Penn- sylvania State University from 1967 to 1995. From 1984 to 1988, Dr. Abler was director of the Geography and Regional Science Program at the Na- tional Science Foundation, where he coordinated the establishment in 1988 of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. Dr. Abler's research explores the ways different societies have used intercom- munications technologies at different times and places. He has written numerous research articles and is coauthor or editor of several books. Most recently he edited Global Change and Local Places: Estimating, Under- standing, and Reducing Greenhouse Gases. Dr. Abler was president of the AAG (1985-1986). He has received the Centenary Medal of the Royal Scot- tish Geographical Society (1990), Association of American Geographers Honors (1995), the Victoria Medal of the Royal Geographical Society/In- stitute of British Geographers (1996), and the Samuel Finley Breese Morse Medal of the American Geographical Society (2004). He earned his B.A., M.A, and Ph.D. (1968) in geography at the University of Minnesota. Anthony R. de Souza, director, Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, was previously executive director of the National Geography Standards Project, secretary general of the 27th International Geographical Union Congress, editor of National Geographic Research & Exploration, and editor of the Journal of Geography. He has held positions as a professor and as a visiting teacher and scholar at the George Washington University, Uni- versity of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, University of Minnesota, University of California, Berkeley, and University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania. He has served as a member of NRC committees. He holds B.A. (honors) and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Reading in England, and has received nu- merous honors and awards, including the Medalla al Benito Juarez in 1992 and the Gilbert Grosvenor honors award from the Association of Ameri- can Geographers in 1996. His research interests include the processes and mechanisms of economic development and human-environment relation- ships. He has published several books and more than 100 articles, reports, and reviews. Paul M. Cutler is a senior program officer for the Polar Research Board of the National Academies. He directs studies in the areas of polar science and atmospheric science. Before joining the Polar Research Board staff, Dr. Cutler was a senior program officer in the Academies' Board on Earth

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APPENDIX A 75 Sciences and Resources, where he directed the Mapping Science Commit- tee and studies in Earth science and geographic information science. Be- fore joining the Academies, he was an assistant scientist and lecturer in the Department of Geology and Geophysics at the University of Wiscon- sin-Madison. His research is in glaciology, hydrology, meteorology, and quaternary science, and he has conducted fieldwork in Alaska, Antarc- tica, arctic Sweden, the Swiss Alps, Pakistan's Karakoram mountains, the midwestern United States, and the Canadian Rockies. Dr. Cutler received an M.Sc. in geography from the University of Toronto and a Ph.D. in geol- ogy from the University of Minnesota. Kristen Campbell is the program director for the George Washington University's Africa Center for Health and Security. Previously, she was a program officer with the National Academies' Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. She received her B.A. and M.S. degrees in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. Prior to joining the National Academies, she was director of programs at the Renewable Natural Re- sources Foundation (RNRF) in Bethesda, Maryland. She provided staff support for several interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary programs that assessed renewable natural resources requirements and formulated pub- lic policy alternatives. She also edited RNRF's Renewable Resources Journal. While at the National Academies, Mrs. Campbell worked on studies in- volving coal waste impoundments, geographic information for sustain- able development in Africa, and the U.S. Climate Change Science Pro- gram Strategic Plan. She was also the study director for the National Academies' Geographical Sciences Committee. She is a member of the Association of American Geographers.

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