TABLE ES-1 Recommendations by Category and Target Population

 

Opportunities for Assessment

 

Integrating Items into Existing Instruments

Developing New In- struments

Leveraging Research on Learning

Exploiting Innovative Measurement Techniques

Developing Frameworks

Broadening the Definition of Technology

K–12 Students

1, 2

3

7, 8

10

11

12

Teachers

4

5

8

10

11

12

Out-of- School Adults

6, 9

6

9

10

11

12

The committee’s overarching finding, based on the review of assessment instruments described above and the results of a committee-sponsored workshop, is that assessment of technological literacy in the United States is in its infancy. This is not surprising given that most students do not take (or have access to) courses in technology, the number of teachers involved in teaching about technology is relatively small, and little effort has been made to determine the nature and extent of adult knowledge of, or attitudes toward, technology.

Assessment of technological literacy in the United States is in its infancy.

On a more positive note, the committee finds no reason why valid, reliable assessments cannot be developed that address one or more of the cognitive dimensions and all of the content domains of technological literacy. Items related to ways of critical thinking and decision making may be the most challenging for assessment developers, and items intended to measure design-related capability pose special challenges related to time and resource constraints. But both types of items can and should be developed.

Opportunities for Assessment

There are two significant opportunities for expanding and improving the assessment of technological literacy in all three populations of interest. The first is to integrate technology-related items into existing instruments focused on related topics; the second is to create new assessments specifically for the measurement of technological literacy. These strategies are not mutually exclusive, and the committee believes that they should be pursued simultaneously.



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