Appendix D
International Astronomical Union Spectral Lines of Most Importance Above 300 GHz

At each triennial meeting of the General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) carefully reviews the list of astrophysically most important spectral lines that it maintains. The IAU expresses the need to protect these frequency bands from in-band, band-edge, and harmonic emissions, especially from spaceborne transmitters.

In preparation for World Radiocommunication Conference 2000, which revised the allocations above 71 GHz, a millimeter-wavelength working group of the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science examined all then-known transitions in the millimeter and submillimeter wavebands. The working group selected a limited number of the astrophysically most important spectral lines to supplement the earlier lists, such as those produced by the IAU, to be used in allocating frequency bands to the Radio Astronomy Service. Spectral lines above 300 GHz are listed in Table D.1. (These data and further information can be found on the Web site of the European Science Foundation’s Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies at http://www.astron.nl/craf/iaulist.htm.)



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Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses Appendix D International Astronomical Union Spectral Lines of Most Importance Above 300 GHz At each triennial meeting of the General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) carefully reviews the list of astrophysically most important spectral lines that it maintains. The IAU expresses the need to protect these frequency bands from in-band, band-edge, and harmonic emissions, especially from spaceborne transmitters. In preparation for World Radiocommunication Conference 2000, which revised the allocations above 71 GHz, a millimeter-wavelength working group of the Scientific Committee on Frequency Allocations for Radio Astronomy and Space Science examined all then-known transitions in the millimeter and submillimeter wavebands. The working group selected a limited number of the astrophysically most important spectral lines to supplement the earlier lists, such as those produced by the IAU, to be used in allocating frequency bands to the Radio Astronomy Service. Spectral lines above 300 GHz are listed in Table D.1. (These data and further information can be found on the Web site of the European Science Foundation’s Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies at http://www.astron.nl/craf/iaulist.htm.)

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Handbook of Frequency Allocations and Spectrum Protection for Scientific Uses TABLE D.1 The Most Important Spectral Lines Between 275 and 1000 GHz Substance Formula Frequency (GHz) Suggested Minimum Band (GHz) Diazenylium N2H+ 279.511 279.23-279.79 Carbon monosulphide CS 293.912 292.93-294.21 Hydronium H3O+ 307.192 306.88-307.50 Deuterated water HDO 313.750 313.44-314.06 Carbon monoxide C18O 329.330 329.00-329.66 Carbon monoxide 13CO 330.587 329.49-330.92 Carbon monosulphide CS 342.883 341.74-343.23 Carbon Monoxide CO 345.796 345.45-346.14 Hydrogen cyanide HCN 354.484 353.30-354.84 Formylium HCO+ 356.734 355.54-357.09 Oxygen O2 368.498 368.13-368.87 Diazenylium N2H+ 372.672 372.30-373.04 Water vapor H2O 380.197 379.82-380.58 Hydronium H3O+ 388.459 388.07-388.85 Carbon monosulphide CS 391.847 390.54-392.24 Oxygen O2 424.763 424.34-425.19 Carbon monoxide C18O 439.088 438.65-439.53 Carbon monoxide 13CO 440.765 439.30-441.21 Carbon monoxide CO 461.041 459.50-461.50 Heavy water HDO 464.925 464.46-465.39 Carbon CI 492.162 490.52-492.65 Hydrogen cyanide HCN 531.716 529.94-532.25 Carbon monosulphide CS 538.689 536.89-539.23 Water vapor H218O 547.676 547.13-548.22 Carbon monoxide 13CO 550.926 549.09-551.48 Water vapor H2O 556.936 556.38-557.49 Ammonia 15NH3 572.113 571.54-572.69 Ammonia NH3 572.498 571.93-573.07 Carbon monoxide CO 576.268 574.35-576.84 Carbon monosulphide CS 587.616 587.03-588.20 Deuterated water HDO 599.927 599.33-600.53 Water vapor H2O 620.700 620.08-621.32 Hydrogen chloride HCl 625.040 624.41-625.67 Hydrogen chloride HCl 625.980 625.35-626.61 Carbon monosulphide CS 636.532 634.41-637.17 Carbon monoxide 13CO 661.067 658.86-661.73 Carbon monoxide CO 691.473 689.17-692.16 Oxygen O2 715.393 714.68-716.11 Carbon monosulphide CS 734.324 733.59-735.06 Water vapor H2O 752.033 751.28-752.79 Oxygen O2 773.840 773.07-774.61 Hydrogen cyanide HCN 797.433 794.77-798.23 Formylium HCO+ 802.653 799.98-803.46 Carbon monoxide CO 806.652 803.96-807.46 Carbon C I 809.350 806.65-810.16 Carbon monosulphide CS 832.057 829.28-832.89 Oxygen O2 834.146 833.31-834.98 Carbon monosulphide CS 880.899 877.96-881.78 Water vapor H2O 916.172 915.26-917.09 Carbon monoxide CO 921.800 918.72-922.72 Carbon monosulphide CS 929.723 926.62-930.65 Water vapor H2O 970.315 969.34-971.29 Carbon monosulphide CS 978.529 977.55-979.51 Water vapor H2O 987.927 986.94-988.92 SOURCE: Data and further information can be found at the Web site of the European Science Foundation’s Committee on Radio Astronomy Frequencies at http://www.astron.nl/craf/iaulist.htm, accessed October 26, 2005.