TABLE 5-2 Areas Relevant to the CARU Guidelines Assessment and Review Process

Themes

Evaluation Outcomes

Children’s health

CARU and adhering industry stakeholders (e.g., food, beverage, restaurant, toy, and entertainment companies, and advertising and marketing agencies) should broaden their involvement in matters of children’s health (e.g., through expanded board and advisory group membership and the establishment of health and wellness advisory boards and committees).

Healthful eating and lifestyle messages

CARU and adhering industry stakeholders should work closely with advertisers and public health professionals to develop strategies for the delivery of consistent healthy lifestyle messages by diverse companies (e.g., food, beverage, restaurant, leisure, and entertainment companies) and multiple forms of media (e.g., broadcast, cable, print, electronic, wireless media) to which children, youth, and their parents are exposed.

Expansion of self-regulatory guidelines for newer forms of marketing

CARU should expand its guidelines beyond those for the traditional broadcast and cable television media to address food, beverage, meal, and sedentary entertainment advertising and promotion to children and youth to include guidelines for newer forms of electronic media (e.g., videogames, interactive websites, advergames, mobile phones, and text messaging).

Industry stakeholders (e.g., food, beverage, restaurant, toy, and entertainment companies, and advertising and marketing agencies) should develop within their own companies guidelines beyond those for the traditional broadcast and cable television to address food, beverage, meal, and sedentary entertainment advertising and promotion to children and youth to include guidelines for newer forms of electronic media.

Predissemination review of advertisements and commercial content

CARU should encourage and strengthen the voluntary predissemination review process of company advertisements before public dissemination through diverse communication channels.

Product placement

CARU should consider measures to monitor paid and in-kind product placement on children’s programming, including broadcast and cable television, children’s films, music, books, and mobile marketing, such as commercial content of cell phone advertising, to ensure that the products are consistent with healthy lifestyle messages.

Use of third-party licensed characters

CARU should ensure that third-party licensed characters (e.g., cartoon spokescharacters) are used to promote low-calorie and high-nutrient foods and beverages that support a healthful diet and healthy lifestyles.

Collaboration with the federal government

CARU and adhering industry stakeholders should work closely with and foster cooperation with FTC to monitor, evaluate, and enforce the effectiveness of the expanded self-regulatory guidelines.



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