els, and sedentary behaviors through population-based sampling over time.

  • The U.S. Congress should appropriate sufficient funds to support research on obesity prevention (e.g., efficacy, effectiveness, quasiexperimental, cost-effectiveness, sustainability, and scaling up research) to improve program implementation and outcomes for children and youth.

Implementation Actions for Industry

The U.S. Congress, in consultation with industry and other relevant stakeholders, should appropriate adequate funds to support independent and periodic evaluations of industry’s efforts to promote healthier lifestyles.


To accomplish this,

  • The Food and Drug Administration should be given the authority to evaluate full serve and quick serve restaurants’ expansion of healthier food, beverage, and meal options; the effectiveness of the restaurant sector in providing nutrition labeling and nutrition information at the point of choice; and the effect of this information on consumers’ purchasing behaviors.

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention should evaluate the effectiveness of corporate-sponsored physical activity programs, energy-balance education programs, and the use of branded physical activity equipment (e.g., physical videogames) on children’s leisure-time preferences and physical activity behaviors.

  • The U.S. Congress should designate a responsible agency to conduct the periodic monitoring and evaluation of the self-regulatory guidelines of the Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU), which should include an assessment of CARU’s effectiveness, impact, and enforcement capacity.

  • The food retail sector, the restaurant sector, and relevant trade associations should collaborate with the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide marketing data on pricing strategies, consumer food purchases, and consumption trends from proprietary retail scanner systems, household scanner panels, household consumption surveys, and marketing research. The collaborative work should examine the quality of the data, consider reducing the cost to make the data more accessible, and establish priorities for applying the information to promote healthful diets.



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