–D–
Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Paul R. Voss is emeritus professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and has served as director of the university’s Applied Population Laboratory. He previously served as assistant director of the Roper Public Opinion Research Center. His research interests are in applied demography, including small-area demographic models of population estimation and projection, as well as human migration and environmental demography and the analysis of spatial statistical data. He served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and has written extensively on the use and applicability of census and American Community Survey data in small communities. He has served on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee as representative from the Population Association of America as well as the Census Bureau’s advisory committee of professional associations. He received masters’ and Ph.D. degrees in sociology (demography) from the University of Michigan.


Jorge Chapa is director of the Center on Democracy in a Multiracial Society at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 1999 to 2006, he was professor and founding director of the Latino Studies Program at Indiana University. Previously, he held research and faculty appointments at the Julian Samora Research Institute at Michigan State University, the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, and the Tomas



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 339
Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census –D– Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Paul R. Voss is emeritus professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and has served as director of the university’s Applied Population Laboratory. He previously served as assistant director of the Roper Public Opinion Research Center. His research interests are in applied demography, including small-area demographic models of population estimation and projection, as well as human migration and environmental demography and the analysis of spatial statistical data. He served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas and has written extensively on the use and applicability of census and American Community Survey data in small communities. He has served on the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Decennial Census Advisory Committee as representative from the Population Association of America as well as the Census Bureau’s advisory committee of professional associations. He received masters’ and Ph.D. degrees in sociology (demography) from the University of Michigan. Jorge Chapa is director of the Center on Democracy in a Multiracial Society at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. From 1999 to 2006, he was professor and founding director of the Latino Studies Program at Indiana University. Previously, he held research and faculty appointments at the Julian Samora Research Institute at Michigan State University, the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, and the Tomas

OCR for page 339
Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census Rivera Center in San Antonio, Texas. His research has focused on Latino educational, occupational, and economic mobility, and has included extensive analysis of census data. He has written extensively on Latino immigration patterns and has reported on housing patterns and dynamics of colonia communities along the U.S.-Mexico border. He served on the Census Bureau’s Advisory Committee on the Hispanic Population for many years and served on the editorial board of the Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census (Anderson, 2000). As a member of committees established by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, he helped develop the Texas “Ten Percent Plan” on university admissions and contributed to an amicus curiae brief to the U.S. Supreme Court in Gratz v. Bollinger (2003). He received masters’ degrees in sociology and demography and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Berkeley. Daniel L. Cork is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as study director of the Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census and the Panel on the Feasibility, Accuracy, and Technical Capability of a National Ballistics Database. He previously served as co-study director of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods and program officer for the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. His research interests include quantitative criminology, particularly space-time dynamics in homicide; Bayesian statistics; and statistics in sports. He holds a B.S. degree in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. Don A. Dillman is regents professor and the Thomas S. Foley distinguished professor of government and public policy in the Departments of Sociology and Community and Rural Sociology at Washington State University. He also serves as deputy director for Research and Development in the Social and Economic Sciences Research Center (SESRC), and he founded the SESRC’s Public Opinion Laboratory, one of the first university-based telephone survey laboratories in the United States. His current research emphasizes how visual design and layout influences respondent answers to self-administered surveys. He served as the senior survey methodologist in the Office of the Director, U.S. Bureau of the Census, leading the development of new questionnaire designs and procedures for the 2000 decennial census and other government surveys. He is a past president of the American Association of Public Opinion Research, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, and 2002 recipient of the Lester F. Ward Award for Distinguished Contributions to Applied Sociology of the Society for Applied Sociology. He holds a master’s degree in rural sociology and a Ph.D. in sociology from Iowa State University.

OCR for page 339
Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census Kathryn Edin is associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania and an associate fellow of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and of the Joint Center for Poverty Research of Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. She previously held positions at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University, the Population Studies Center at the University of Pennsylvania, the Center for Urban Policy Research at Rutgers University, and the Russell Sage Foundation. Her principal research interests include poverty and social inequality, urban and community sociology, and family and gender. She is currently principal investigator or co-principal investigator on research projects on the social role of children and marriage among low-income adults, the role of local labor markets and child support programs in affecting fathers’ economic and emotional involvement with their children, and couple dynamics among low-income married and unmarried couples with young children. She served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs. She received her masters’ and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from Northwestern University. Colm A. O’Muircheartaigh is professor in the Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies and vice president for statistics and methodology in the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago. His research encompasses survey sample design, measurement errors in surveys, cognitive aspects of question wording, and latent variable models for nonresponse. He has served as a consultant to a wide range of public and commercial organizations in the United States, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands and elsewhere. Through his work with the United Nations and other international organizations, he has worked in China, Myan Mar (Burma), Kenya, Lesotho, and Peru. Prior to moving to Chicago, he was founding director of the Methodology Institute of the London School of Economics and Political Science. He has served as president of the International Association of Survey Statisticians and is chair-elect of the Social Statistics Section of the American Statistical Association. He is a fellow of the Royal Statistical Society and the American Statistical Association and is an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. Judith A. Seltzer is professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin, where she contributed to the development and implementation of the National Survey of Families and Households. Her research interests include kinship patterns, intergenerational obligations, relationships between nonres-

OCR for page 339
Once, Only Once, and in the Right Place: Residence Rules in the Decennial Census ident fathers and children, and how legal institutions and other policies affect family change. As part of a cross-university consortium of researchers, she is developing new models for explaining family change and variation, in which family dynamics and residence patterns will be important components. She has also participated in the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey. She has collaborated on research to improve the quality of data on children’s living arrangements, transfers, and contact with nonresident parents using information from surveys and administrative data. She received her master’s and Ph.D. degress in sociology from the University of Michigan. C. Matthew Snipp is a professor in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University. He has written extensively on American Indians and has written specifically on the interaction of American Indians and the U.S. census. He was a member of the CNSTAT Panel on Research on Future Census Methods, which reviewed early plans for the 2010 decennial census. He has served on the Census Bureau’s Technical Advisory Committee on Racial and Ethnic Statistics and the Native American Population Advisory Committee, both of the U.S. Census Bureau. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. Roger Tourangeau is director of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and a senior research scientist at the University of Michigan. Previously, he was a senior methodologist at the Gallup Organization, where he designed and selected samples and carried out methodological studies, and at the National Opinion Research Center, where he founded and directed the Statistics and Methodology Center. His research focuses on attitude and opinion measurement and on differences across methods of data collection; he also has extensive experience as an applied sampler, and is well known for his work on the cognitive aspects of survey methodology. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and has served on the editorial board of Public Opinion Quarterly and on the Census Joint Advisory Panel. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Yale University.