Appendixes



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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Appendixes

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability This page intially left blank

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Leslie Kenne, Chair, currently provides consultancy services as LK Associates. She retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2003 as Deputy Chief of Staff for Warfighting Integration, Headquarters U.S. Air Force, Washington, D.C. She was responsible to the Secretary of the Air Force and the Chief of Staff for forming and executing policy and strategy to integrate command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities to enable more effective employment of air and space power in support of national objectives. General Kenne provided guidance and direction to four field operating agencies: the Air Force Command and Control & Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Center; the Air Force Communications Agency; the Air Force Frequency Management Agency; and the Air Force Agency for Modeling and Simulation. General Kenne entered the Air Force in 1971 as a distinguished graduate of Auburn University’s ROTC program. She served as a flight-line maintenance officer in operations, and attended the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School in 1974. After school, she served as a test-and-evaluation project manager and in test-and-evaluation supervisory positions. General Kenne served in two other Pentagon staff positions, first as a division chief, and during a second tour as a deputy director in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. She has directed three major programs: the Low Altitude Navigation and Targeting Infrared System for Night, the F-16, and the Joint Strike Fighter. She served as vice commander both of the Aeronautical Systems Center at Wright-Patterson Air Force

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Base, Ohio, and of the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base, California, and commanded the Electronic Systems Center, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts. In addition to her management of major Air Force aircraft acquisition programs, General Kenne led a division of the Special Projects Office of the Air Force that managed low-observable research and applications. Seth Bonder (NAE) was the founder and CEO of Vector Research, Incorporated (VRI) for 31 years, a company recognized for its quality and innovations in applying operational research and management science to public- and private-sector enterprises. Throughout his distinguished career, Dr. Bonder has been a leader in applying operations research to national defense planning and policy issues, and subsequently to health care delivery reengineering and disease-management practices. Dr. Bonder made major contributions to the operations research profession. He served as 27th president of the Operations Research Society of America and the Military Operations Research Society and as vice president of the International Federation of Operational Research Societies. He has received numerous awards, including the Patriotic Service Award from the Secretary of the Army, the George E. Kimball Medal, and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences President’s Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. John J. (“JJ”) Campbell is the director of proprietary programs, Military Systems Organization at General Electric Aviation. He directs the conduct of advanced research projects dealing with the control of signature for current and future weapons systems. His work includes highly classified activities in materials, manufacturing processes, conceptual designs of propulsion solutions, and new advanced cycle approaches. He manages the company funding and roadmaps targeted to this technology for subsonic and supersonic applications. He has more than 20 years of experience in the development, subsequent establishment, and execution of advanced technology programs within government and industry channels. He has an extensive background in conventional and nuclear survivability studies. Bennett M. Croswell is the vice president of Military Development Programs for Pratt & Whitney with responsibility for the development of advanced gas turbine engine products and technologies. In this position, Mr. Bennett is responsible for new and derivative products, unmanned air

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability vehicle and advanced programs as well as small turboshaft and turbofan propulsion systems. He began his career with Pratt & Whitney in 1979 as an analytical engineer specializing in engine performance and modeling. He held positions of increasing responsibility, including the engineering manager position for the Navy A/F–X (1991-1993). In 1995, he was appointed JSF119 model manager responsible for developing the propulsion system to power the Lockheed Martin Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Concept Demonstrator Aircraft. He left the JSF program in 1997 when he was selected for the position of assistant to the president, Large Military Engines. Mr. Bennett returned to the JSF program in 1999 and was appointed JSF119 Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) program director in December 2000. As EMD director, he was responsible for all aspects of the JSF119 EMD program including definition of the engine configuration, planning the program, and managing the EMD proposal. In November 2001, Mr. Bennett was named director of the F119/F/A-22 program and became vice president of that program in 2003. He earned a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Tennessee in 1979 and an M.B.A. in aviation from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in 1989. He is also a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College, Fort Belvoir, Virginia (1993). Mr. Bennett has authored several papers published by technical societies and has lectured at the University of Tennessee Short Course on Propulsion and the Purdue University Short Course on Winged Flight Vehicles. He is also a member of the University of Tennessee Aerospace Advisory Board and the Air Force Association. In 2001, he was part of the team awarded the Collier Trophy for the development of the Integrated Lift Fan Propulsion System for the JSF program. Alec Gallimore is currently with the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory at the University of Michigan. His primary research interests include electric propulsion, plasma diagnostics, space plasma simulation, electrode physics, and hypersonic aerodynamics and plasma interaction. He has extensive design and testing experience with a number of electric propulsion devices, including Hall thrusters, ion engines, arcjets, 100-kW-class steady magnetoplasmadynamic thrusters, and multimegawatt pulsed coaxial plasma accelerators. He has implemented a variety of probe, microwave, and optical/laser plasma diagnostics, and has graduated 15 Ph.D. students and 11 M.S students in the field of electric propulsion. Professor Gallimore has more than 170 archival journal articles and confer-

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability ence papers and 2 book chapters in electric propulsion. He is also director of the NASA-funded Michigan Space Grant Consortium and is an adviser to the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. Charles L. Guthrie is the director of Advanced Capabilities Development for Northrop Grumman’s Western Region within the Integrated Systems Sector. He is responsible for all future-systems programs that include the topics of space systems, future strike systems, missile defense systems, and naval system integration. Some of his previous positions include director of unmanned systems rapid prototyping and advanced concepts at Boeing Phantom Works; director of the joint strike fighter air vehicle integrated product team for Boeing Military Aircraft and Missiles; and director of air vehicle advance design for the Phantom Works. He was a Boeing technical fellow, and was named manager of the year in 1993 and 1994 by North American Aircraft and the Southern California Area Council, respectively, and engineer of the year in 1987 and 1988 by North American Aircraft/Rockwell. In addition to earning a B.S. in aerospace engineering from the University of Kansas, Mr. Guthrie has completed many technical short courses in topics such as radar, aircraft design, and engine-airframe integration, and employee development courses. He works to support the California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo School of Engineering, the University of Kansas Aerospace Department, the Naval Postgraduate School, and California State University, Long Beach, by providing industry feedback, serving on advisory boards, and conducting guest lectures. He is a senior member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and has served on its Aircraft Design Technical Committee. He is also a senior member of the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International and a member of the National Management Association. Neil G. Kacena was named vice president, Advanced Development Programs at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics–Palmdale in March 2005. He is responsible for directing all Advanced Development Programs activities, leading more than 1,400 people in the pursuit of advanced concepts, product improvements, derivatives, technology development, mission area architecture, and prototyping. Mr. Kacena also acts as chair of the Lockheed Martin corporate-wide Low Observables Technology Focus Group, working across business areas and company lines to address critical technologies for applications to advanced projects. Previously, Mr. Kacena was the direc-

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability tor of Advanced Development Program’s Technology Development and Integration organization. Prior to that, he served as the director of Signature Management Systems and deputy director, Advanced Development Programs. In 1998, Mr. Kacena joined the Skunk Works after a 25-year career in the Air Force, where he achieved the rank of colonel. His Air Force experience included service as a fighter pilot in the F-4 Phantom and F-15 Eagle aircraft; Fighter Weapons School instructor; 9th Fighter Squadron commander; chief, U.S. Liaison Office in Doha, Qatar; and culminated as director of Special Programs in the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. Mr. Kacena received a Masters of Science degree in management from Troy State University. He attended Iowa State University where he graduated with a B.S. degree in industrial engineering. He is affiliated with various organizations, including the Air Force Association, Order of the Daedalians, the Iowa State University Alumni Association, National Defense Industrial Association, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Association of Old Crows. Gregory S. Martin retired from the Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, as commander on September 1, 2005. He oversaw the research, development, and testing and evaluation, and provided the acquisitions management services and logistics support necessary to keep Air Force weapon systems ready for war. He earned a B.S. degree from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1970 and a master’s degree in business management from Central Michigan University in 1977. He entered the Air Force in June 1970 with a commission from the U.S. Air Force Academy. In addition to flying 161 combat missions in Southeast Asia, he commanded the 67th Tactical Fighter Squadron, the 479th Tactical Training Wing, and the 33rd and 1st Fighter Wings. He also served as vice director of the Joint Staff’s Force Structure and Resources Directorate, director of Operational Requirements for the U.S. Air Force, and principal deputy to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition. Before assuming his last position, General Martin served as the commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Allied Air Forces Northern Europe. He is a command pilot with more than 4,600 flying hours in various aircraft, including the F-4, F-15, C-20, and C-21. Jesse T. (Tom) McMahan has more than 35 years of experience in aerospace activities in government and industry, specializing in advanced technologies such as stealth and counterstealth. He spent 25 years in the Air Force and

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability had oversight responsibility for all Air Force special access programs at the time of his retirement in 1993. He is an acknowledged, national-level expert in mission-level modeling and simulation of advanced aeronautical and defense systems. Mr. McMahan serves on numerous senior advisory boards for both government and industry. Along with the other co-president of Modern Technology Solutions, Inc. (MTSI), he is responsible for the overall technical, financial, and business management of the corporation. He has specialized expertise in low-observable and counter-low-observable technology and electronic countermeasures. MTSI is currently serving a number of government and industry clients in tasks including operational analyses of modern low-observable and counter-low-observable weapons systems, red teaming of proposals, analysis of technology investment plans, and advising on and preparing flight test plans and procedures. MTSI also supports the Missile Defense Agency in technology planning, system requirements analysis, and sensor integration and evaluation. He is a specialist in mission- and scenario-level computer modeling of complex integrated air defense systems and their response to reduced-observable vehicles and is significantly involved in analyzing the potential impact of coordinated stealth and information warfare and electronic warfare on modern air defense and command systems. Robert A. Moore is a consultant at DST, Inc. His early career was in the aerodynamic design and development of tactical aircraft and high-speed cruise missiles at McDonnell Aircraft, beginning with the F-3H, F-4, F-101, and the Triton hypersonic missile. With the beginning of the manned space program, he worked on the reentry thermal protection problem for Mercury and then on electric propulsion for space travel. He then moved to the intercontinental ballistic missile program, where he assisted the Air Force and Navy in the management of reentry physics, penetration aids, and reentry vehicle technology programs. He then joined government in the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and managed advanced technology programs for future strategic offensive and defensive systems. He also originated and managed antisubmarine warfare programs. He became director of the Tactical Technology Office at DARPA and directed programs in air vehicle technology and observables, stealth aircraft, armored vehicle and antiarmor technology, undersea warfare technology, and sensor systems. Later he was deputy director of DARPA. During the Carter Administration, Mr. Moore was appointed to the executive position of Deputy Undersecretary of Defense for Tactical Warfare

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Programs and was responsible for planning and oversight of acquisition of all defense systems for land, sea, and air warfare. He returned to industry at the Lockheed Martin Corporation Skunk Works. Next he established a consulting company in which he continues to be active, providing advice to major aerospace and defense companies in the areas of systems analysis and engineering, systems management, research and technology, program development, and proposal preparation. He participates in corporate strategic planning efforts and has served on numerous corporate boards of directors and advisory boards. He serves on government and military advisory panels and is a member of the Army Science Board. He was a charter member of the Senior Executive Service (SES), received the SES Presidential Rank Award and the Secretary of Defense Meritorious Civilian Service Medal. Mr. Moore received B.S. and M.S. degrees in mechanical engineering with concentration on studies in fluid mechanics, aerodynamics, thermodynamics, plasma physics, and heat transfer. David M. Van Wie is an aerospace engineer in the field of aerospace vehicle design and development with emphasis on propulsion systems and advanced aerodynamics for supersonic and hypersonic flight vehicles. He has been with the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory since 1983 and is currently a member of the principal professional staff and director of the Precision Engagement Transformation Center. Dr. Van Wie also holds appointments as research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University and lecturer in the Department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland. Dr. Van Wie attended the University of Maryland between 1976 and 1986 and received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aerospace engineering. He was also awarded an M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1998, with an emphasis on radar and communication systems. He was awarded the Gene Zara Award for outstanding contributions to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program in 1989 and 1992. Dr. Van Wie was a member of the USAF Scientific Advisory Board’s (SAB’s) Committee on Hypersonic Airbreathing Vehicles (1991), a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on the Assessment of the Air Force Hypersonic Technology Program (1987), and member of the USAF SAB 2000 Summer Study on Air Force Hypersonics. Alan R. Wiechman is vice president, Advance Global Strike Systems, within Advanced Systems for Integrated Defense Systems (IDS), of the Boeing

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Company. He was also responsible for East operations, which include Mesa, Arizona; Huntsville, Alabama; St. Louis, Missouri; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This responsibility includes future military fighters, bombers, directed energy efforts, hypersonics, survivability, and several proprietary efforts for Phantom Works. From 2000 to 2004, Mr. Wiechman was the division director and manager for proprietary programs within IDS. Prior to that, from 1992 to 2000, he was director of Signature/Design Applications, Advanced Military Aircraft, and Missiles Phantom Works. He joined McDonnell Douglas in 1981 as a section chief assigned to develop future low-observables technology. From 1977 to 1981 he worked in the Skunk Works at Lockheed Martin on a variety of advanced programs that included Sea Shadow, Proto Type Pre-F-117 and F-117A. Mr. Wiechman holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo in 1972. Michael I. Yarymovych is president of Sarasota Space Associates, an aerospace consultancy, with clients in the government and the aerospace industry. Until the end of 2003, he served on the board of trustees of the ANSER Corporation in Arlington, Virginia, and was also its chief scientific adviser. In 1998 Dr. Yarymovych retired from the Boeing Company, where he most recently served as vice president for international technology of the Information, Space and Defense Systems Group. He was responsible for the assessment of technology capabilities of international and domestic enterprises for partnership and business development opportunities. Prior to this assignment and the merger of Boeing with the aerospace portion of Rockwell, he was vice president and associate director of Rockwell’s Systems Development Center, responsible for the early phases of missile defense systems development, strategy and policy analysis, concept formulation, technology assessment and long-range planning for the center, located in Seal Beach, California. It was created in 1986 to focus the corporation’s high-technology resources and capabilities on selected major growth opportunities that required the core competencies, skills, and resources of multiple divisions. In addition to his responsibilities in industry, Dr. Yarymovych has had an active role, which continues in the present, on many scientific advisory committees, including the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, the Science Council of the NASA Institute for Advanced Concepts, the NASA Advisory Council Task Force on Space Goals, the Stanford University Industrial Affiliates Advisory Board, Defense Science Board studies, and the Space Panel of the National Research Council’s Naval

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Future Air Force Needs for Survivability Studies Board. From 1997 to 2003, Dr. Yarymovych was president of the International Academy of Astronautics, and from 1996 to 2000 he served as chairman of the NATO Research and Technology Organization, which is the successor to the Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development (AGARD) and the Defense Research Group. He was U.S. national delegate to AGARD from 1991 and its chairman from 1994. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics and was its president from 1982 to 1983. Dr. Yarymovych has been widely recognized for his accomplishments in engineering, research, and management. He is a four-time recipient of the Air Force Exceptional Civilian Service Award, and he also received the Energy Research and Development Administration Distinguished Service Award in 1977.