APPENDIX E
Committee Biosketches

ROSINA M. BIERBAUM (Co-chair) is dean of the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment and professor of natural resources and environmental policy. Prior to her appointment at Michigan, she served as acting director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President. She joined OSTP in November 1993 as a senior policy analyst and served as assistant director for environment before being confirmed by the U.S. Senate as associate director. As the Administration’s senior scientific advisor on environmental research and development, Dr. Bierbaum provided scientific input and guidance on a wide range of national and international environmental issues, including global change, air and water quality, endangered species, biodiversity, ecosystem management, endocrine disruptors, environmental monitoring, natural hazards, and energy research and development. Dr. Bierbaum is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She is a past member of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Bierbaum received her Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from the State University of New York at Stony Brook.


MARY ANNE CARROLL (Co-chair) is director of the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions and Transport (PROPHET), executive director of the Biosphere-Atmosphere Research and Training Program (BART), and a professor of atmospheric, oceanic, and space sciences and chemistry and geological sciences at the University of Michigan. Her areas of interest include oxidant photochemistry, distribution, and trends; atmosphere-forest exchange of



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Understanding Multiple Environmental Stresses: Report of a Workshop APPENDIX E Committee Biosketches ROSINA M. BIERBAUM (Co-chair) is dean of the University of Michigan’s School of Natural Resources and Environment and professor of natural resources and environmental policy. Prior to her appointment at Michigan, she served as acting director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) in the Executive Office of the President. She joined OSTP in November 1993 as a senior policy analyst and served as assistant director for environment before being confirmed by the U.S. Senate as associate director. As the Administration’s senior scientific advisor on environmental research and development, Dr. Bierbaum provided scientific input and guidance on a wide range of national and international environmental issues, including global change, air and water quality, endangered species, biodiversity, ecosystem management, endocrine disruptors, environmental monitoring, natural hazards, and energy research and development. Dr. Bierbaum is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the NRC’s Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. She is a past member of the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Bierbaum received her Ph.D. in ecology and evolution from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. MARY ANNE CARROLL (Co-chair) is director of the Program for Research on Oxidants: PHotochemistry, Emissions and Transport (PROPHET), executive director of the Biosphere-Atmosphere Research and Training Program (BART), and a professor of atmospheric, oceanic, and space sciences and chemistry and geological sciences at the University of Michigan. Her areas of interest include oxidant photochemistry, distribution, and trends; atmosphere-forest exchange of

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Understanding Multiple Environmental Stresses: Report of a Workshop reactive nitrogen (a factor in carbon storage); and the impacts of air pollutants on ecosystem function and emissions. She served as editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres from 1997 to 2000, is a past member of the NRC’s Committee on Geophysical and Environmental Data and the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry, and a current member of its Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. Dr. Carroll received her Sc.D. in atmospheric chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. CHRISTOPHER B. FIELD is director of the Department of Global Ecology at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and professor by courtesy in the Department of Biological Sciences at Stanford University. Trained as an ecologist, Dr. Field has conducted environmental research from tropical rainforests to deserts to alpine tundra. He developed an evolutionary approach to understanding the spatial organization of plant canopies and the adaptive significance of leaf aging. These studies led to work on the role of nitrogen in regulating plant growth and photosynthesis and suggested ways that plant physiological responses could be summarized with a few parameters, providing a basis for predicting many aspects of ecosystem function at very large scales. He has recently emphasized formalizing approaches for summarizing plant responses into models that simulate ecosystem exchanges of carbon, water, and energy at the global scale. These models help test hypotheses and understand the future status of terrestrial ecosystems, especially responses to and influences on global change factors like increased atmospheric carbon dioxide or altered climate. Dr. Field is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the NRC’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. He received his Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University. EDWARD L. MILES is the Virginia and Prentice Bloedel Professor of Marine and Public Affairs in the School of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington and senior fellow at the Joint Institute for the Study of Atmosphere and Oceans. Since 1965 Dr. Miles has worked at the interface of the natural and social sciences and law with a focus on outer space, the oceans, and the global and regional climate systems. Trained originally in political science and international relations, he has invested close to 30 years in learning about oceanography and fisheries science/management and 13 years in learning about the planetary climate system. His research and teaching interests have encompassed international science and technology policy; the design, creation, and management of international environmental regimes; a wide variety of problems in national and international ocean policy; and the impacts of climate variability and climate change at global and regional space scales. Dr. Miles is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the NRC’s Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change and Policy and Global Affairs Committee. He received his Ph.D. in international relations/comparative politics from the University of Denver.

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Understanding Multiple Environmental Stresses: Report of a Workshop DONALD A. WILHITE is founder and director of the National Drought Mitigation Center and International Drought Information Center and a professor in the School of Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he has been on the faculty since 1977. His areas of interest include drought preparedness, mitigation and policy, climate and drought monitoring, the policy implications of climate variability and climate change, and the effects of climate on society. In conjunction with this research, he has worked with many developed and developing countries, regional organizations, and United Nations agencies on drought management and policy issues. He has also conducted numerous training seminars and workshops on drought planning and management. Dr. Wilhite is chair of the drought discussion group for the U.N.’s Secretariat for the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. He received his Ph.D. in geography, climatology, and water resources from the University of Nebraska.

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