82. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA). Codified at 15 U.S.C. 2051-2084. Public Law 92-573; 86 Stat. 1207, Oct. 27, 1972.

  

83. Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA). Codified at 15 U.S.C. 1261-1278. Public Law 86-613; 74 Stat. 372, July 12, 1960, as amended.

  

84. Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA). Codified at 15 U.S.C. 1261-1278. Public Law 86-613; 74 Stat. 372, July 12, 1960, as amended.

  

85. Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA). Codified at 15 U.S.C. 1261-1278. Public Law 86-613; 74 Stat. 372, July 12, 1960, as amended.

  

86. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC). 2005. 2006 Performance Budget Request: Saving Lives and Keeping Families Safe. February.

  

87. J. Bromme. 2005. Nanotechnology and the consumer product safety commission. Product Safety & Liability Reporter 33(11; March 14).

  

88. F. Schrotter, American National Standards Institute, presentation to this committee, March 24, 2005.

  

89. See http://www.ansi.org/standards_activities/standards_boards_panels/nsp/overview.aspx?menuid=3#news, accessed March 2006.

  

90. P. Picariello, ASTM International, presentation to this committee, March 24, 2005.

  

91. D. Gamota, Motorola, presentation to this committee, March 24, 2005.

  

92. D.M. Berube, University of South Carolina, presentation to this committee, February 11, 2005.

  

93. D. Rejeski, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, presentation to this committee, February 11, 2005.

  

94. N. Jacobstein, Institute for Molecular Manufacturing, presentation to this committee, February 11, 2005.

  

95. D. Rolison, Naval Research Laboratory, presentation to this committee, March 25, 2005.

  

96. Rio Declaration on Environment and Development. 1992. The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  

97. National Research Council. 1989. Field Testing Genetically Modified Organisms: Framework for Decisions. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

  

98. Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2004. Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press.

  

99. G. Hunt, Nanotechnology and survival—Ethics and organisational accountability, paper delivered at the Institute for Seizon and the Life Sciences, July 5, 2003, Tokyo. Available at http://www.freedomtocare.org/page316.htm.

  

100. In this regard, the committee notes that NNI-participating agencies are funding research on the novel properties and biological and environmental effects of some nanomaterials that have already been introduced into the environment.

  

101. G. Khushf, University of South Carolina, presentation to this committee, March 25, 2005.

  

102. G. Khushf, University of South Carolina, presentation to this committee, March 25, 2005.

  

103. Plato. Phaedrus.

  

104. J. Macoubrie. 2005. Informed Public Perceptions of Nanotechnology and Trust in Government. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies.

  

105. J. Macoubrie. 2005. Informed Public Perceptions of Nanotechnology and Trust in Government. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Project on Emerging Nanotechnologies.

  

106. See http://www.nanojury.org/, accessed March 2006.

  

107. Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research Team. Undated. From laboratory to society: Developing an informed approach to nanoscale science and technology. Grant 0304448. Nano Science and Technology Studies, University of South Carolina. See http://nsts.nano.sc.edu/nirt.html.



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