TABLE 4-1 Differences Among Markey Scholars, Top-Ranked, and Competitive Candidates in Academia on Selected Outcome Measures

Outcome Measure

Markey Scholar

Top-Ranked Candidate

Competitive Candidate

Significant Difference

Number

87

55

49

Percentage Promoted and Tenured

100

63

57

Yesa

Percentage in Top-Tier Universities

60

24

10

Yesa

aMarkey Scholars are significantly different from both top-ranked and competitive candidates.

TABLE 4-2 Number and Percentage of Markey Scholars and Top-Ranked and Competitive Candidates in Academia by Faculty Rank

Academic Rank

Markey Scholars

Top-Ranked Candidates

Competitive Candidates

Total

Assistant Professor

0

17

11

28

 

(0%)

(31%)

(22%)

(15%)

Associate Professor

43

29

22

94

 

(49%)

(53%)

(45%)

(49%)

Professor

44

6

6

56

 

(51%)

(11%)

(12%)

(29%)

Other Positiona

0

3

10

13

 

(0%)

(5%)

(20%)

(7%)

Total

87

55

49

191

 

(100%)

(100%)

(100%)

(100%)

aOther positions include adjunct professor, instructor, research professor, visiting professor, clinical professor, etc.

As shown in Table 4-1, of the Markey Scholars employed in academia, all were employed in tenure-track positions and all were tenured. Moreover, as shown in Table 4-2, half had also been promoted to full professor. For top-ranked and competitive candidates, not all of the academicians were in tenure-track positions, about one-quarter had not been tenured, and only a few had been promoted to full professor.

Markey Scholars in academia were also granted tenure in significantly less time than either top-ranked or competitive candidates. Markey Scholars reached tenure significantly faster with an average of 5.4 years in the professoriate, compared to 7.1 and 7.8 years for top-ranked and competitive candidates.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement