APPENDIX E
Speaker Biographies and List of Workshop Participants

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES

RICHARD CHOULARTON is the contingency and response planning advisor for the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). He is a specialist in planning emergency responses to humanitarian crises including famines. As a practitioner, Mr. Choularton’s main focus is on improving the use of good analysis in decision-making and planning processes in order to foster more timely and appropriate response to humanitarian crises. This includes the use of remote sensing to support early warning and response efforts. Prior to FEWS NET, Mr. Choularton served as the global focal point for contingency planning for the United Nations World Food Programme and as a member of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Working Group for Preparedness and Contingency Planning. Mr. Choularton holds a B.A. in history and political science from Vanderbilt University and an M.Sc. in risk, crisis, and disaster management from the University of Leicester, U.K.


RITA COLWELL is chairman of Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc., and distinguished university professor at both the University of Maryland at College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and the developing world. Dr. Colwell served as the eleventh director of the National Science Foundation, 1998-2004.



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Contributions of Land Remote Sensing for Decisions about Food Security and Human Health: Workshop Report APPENDIX E Speaker Biographies and List of Workshop Participants SPEAKER BIOGRAPHIES RICHARD CHOULARTON is the contingency and response planning advisor for the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). He is a specialist in planning emergency responses to humanitarian crises including famines. As a practitioner, Mr. Choularton’s main focus is on improving the use of good analysis in decision-making and planning processes in order to foster more timely and appropriate response to humanitarian crises. This includes the use of remote sensing to support early warning and response efforts. Prior to FEWS NET, Mr. Choularton served as the global focal point for contingency planning for the United Nations World Food Programme and as a member of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Working Group for Preparedness and Contingency Planning. Mr. Choularton holds a B.A. in history and political science from Vanderbilt University and an M.Sc. in risk, crisis, and disaster management from the University of Leicester, U.K. RITA COLWELL is chairman of Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc., and distinguished university professor at both the University of Maryland at College Park and Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health, and she is currently developing an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and the developing world. Dr. Colwell served as the eleventh director of the National Science Foundation, 1998-2004.

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Contributions of Land Remote Sensing for Decisions about Food Security and Human Health: Workshop Report Dr. Colwell is a member of the National Academy of Sciences; the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm; the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and the American Philosophical Society. Dr. Colwell holds a B.S. in bacteriology and an M.S. in genetics from Purdue University, and a Ph.D. in oceanography from the University of Washington. ANTHONY C. JANETOS has been vice president of the Heinz Center since March 2003; he joined the center as a senior fellow in June 2002. Dr. Janetos also directs the center’s Global Change Program. Before coming to the Heinz Center, he served as vice president for science and research at the World Resources Institute and senior scientist for the Land-Cover and Land-Use Change Program in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Earth Science. He was also program scientist for NASA’s Landsat 7 mission. He was a co-chair of the U.S. National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change and an author of the International Panel for Climate Change Special Report on Land-Use Change and Forestry and the Global Biodiversity Assessment. Dr. Janetos is chair of the National Research Council (NRC) Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs. Dr. Janetos graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College with a bachelor’s degree in biology and earned a master’s degree and a Ph.D. in biology from Princeton University. CHRISTIAN J. JOHANNSEN is professor emeritus of agronomy and director emeritus of the Laboratory for Applications of Remote Sensing (LARS) at Purdue University. Dr. Johannsen first joined the agronomy faculty at Purdue University in 1963. He served as a program leader of LARS from 1966 to 1972. From 1972 to 1985, he held research and extension positions at the University of Missouri and was a visiting scientist at the University of California (1980-1981). In 1985, he returned to Purdue University as director of the Agricultural Data Network. From 1988 to 1996 he served as director of the Natural Resources Research Institute (renamed the Environmental Sciences and Engineering Institute in 1994), which had LARS within its structure. In 1996-1997, he was a visiting chief scientist with Space Imaging Inc. developing agricultural applications of remote sensing. He has served on many national and international committees and activities including the NRC Committee on the Geographic Foundation for Agenda 21 (2001-2003), the Steering Committee for Space Applications and Commercialization (1999-2003), the Space Studies Board (1998-2001), and the Committee on Earth Studies (1995-1998). MARC LEVY is associate director for science applications at the Center for International Earth Sciences Information Network (CIESIN) and is an

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Contributions of Land Remote Sensing for Decisions about Food Security and Human Health: Workshop Report adjunct faculty member of the School of International and Public Affairs. His training is in political science, and he has published on environmental sustainability indicators, the effectiveness of international environmental institutions, social learning and environmental policy making, and environment-security connections. He led CIESIN’s work on the Environmental Sustainability Index and the Human Footprint, serves as a project scientist of the Socioeconomic Data and Applications Center, coordinates CIESIN’s work for the Millennium Development Project, and directs work measuring state capacity. Before coming to CIESIN, Mr. Levy had teaching appointments at Princeton University and Williams College. He is a convening lead author for the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, a member of the State Failure Task Force, and co-chair of the Planning Committee of the 2003 Open Meeting of the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change Research Committee. DAVID ROGERS is a professor of ecology and zoology at Oxford University. Dr. Rogers spent two years in Uganda studying the population ecology of the tsetse fly, an interest that developed into a fascination with trypanosomiasis epidemiology and then the epidemiology of other vector-borne diseases. Dr. Rogers realized the potential of remotely sensed satellite data in such studies in the early 1990s, and the Trypanosomaiasis and Land-use in Africa (TALA) Research Group—within the Department of Zoology at Oxford—continues to extend these applications to indirectly and directly transmitted diseases of many sorts and to the fields of conservation and biodiversity. Dr. Rogers has conducted research and international reviews on vector populations and remote sensing for organizations such as the World Health Organization, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and NASA. He is also a founding fellow of Green College. Dr. Rogers received his Ph.D. from Oxford University. JAMES VERDIN leads early warning and environmental monitoring activities at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. His research and applications interests are in the use of remote sensing and modeling to geographically characterize hydrological and agrometeorological processes. He has been part of the USGS team supporting the FEWS NET and other U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) programs since 1992. He has extensive project experience in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the western United States. Dr. Verdin holds a B.S. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of Wisconsin, Madison; an M.S. in civil engineering from Colorado State University; and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

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Contributions of Land Remote Sensing for Decisions about Food Security and Human Health: Workshop Report TERRY YATES is the vice president for research and economic development and a professor of biology and pathology at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Yates is also the curator of genomic resources at the University of New Mexico’s Museum of Southwestern Biology. His research interests are in surveillance and monitoring of Hantavirus in natural populations of mammals. Dr. Yates has served as director of the division of environmental biology at the National Science Foundation (NSF), chair of the Department of Biology at the University of New Mexico, director of the Museum of Southwestern Biology, director of the Systematic Biology Program and head of the Systematic and Population Biology Cluster at NSF. He is a member of the Board of Directors and chairman of the Board of Trustees of the American Society of Mammalogists, a trustee of the Southwestern Association of Naturalists, and president of the Natural Science Collections Alliance. Dr. Yates received his Ph.D. from Texas Tech University, his M.S. from Texas A&M University, and his B.S. from Murray State University. LIST OF WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS Saud Amer, U.S. Agency for International Development, Office of Sustainable Development William Anderson, National Research Council Joan Aron, Science Communication Studies Tom Barnwell, Environmental Protection Agency Ling Bian, University of Buffalo Art Charo, National Research Council Bob Chen, CIESIN, Columbia University Richard Choularton, FEWS NET Ric Cicone, ISciences Christine Coussens, National Research Council Melba Crawford, Purdue University Brad Doorn, U.S. Department of Agriculture Gary Eilerts, U.S. Agency for International Development Michael Emch, University of North Carolina Paul Epstein, Harvard University Sallie Findley, Columbia University Durland Fish, Yale University Robert E. Ford, Loma Linda University Chris Funk, University of California-Santa Barbara Gregory Glass, Johns Hopkins University Doug Goodin, Kansas State University Steve Guptil, U.S. Geological Survey Garik Gutman, National Aeronautics and Space Administration

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Contributions of Land Remote Sensing for Decisions about Food Security and Human Health: Workshop Report Marc Imhoff, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tony Janetos, The Heinz Center Chris Johannsen, Purdue University John Kelmelis, U.S. State Department Uriel Kitron, University of Illinois Marc Levy, CIESIN, Columbia University David Lobell, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tom Loveland, U.S. Geological Survey Kathleen Miner, U.S. State Department Steve Nelson, Chemonics Esra Ozdenerol, University of Memphis Garry Peterson, McGill University Dale Quattrochi, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Curt Reynolds, U.S. Department of Agriculture David Rogers, Oxford University David Skole, Michigan State University Roy Stacy, Chemonics Paul Stern, National Research Council Jim Tucker, U.S. Global Change Research Program Billie Turner, Clark University James Verdin, U.S. Geological Survey Firoz Verjee, George Washington University Dan Walker, National Research Council Charlie Walthall, U.S. Department of Agriculture Ray Wassel, National Research Council Terry Yates, University of New Mexico

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