PLATE 1 Structure of a flower (Frasera speciosa, Gentianaceae; visited by the bumble bee Bombus flavifrons). Photo by David Inouye, University of Maryland, College Park.



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OCR for page 309
Status of Pollinators in North America PLATE 1 Structure of a flower (Frasera speciosa, Gentianaceae; visited by the bumble bee Bombus flavifrons). Photo by David Inouye, University of Maryland, College Park.

OCR for page 309
Status of Pollinators in North America PLATE 2 Pollinating insects, clockwise from top left: honey bee (Apis mellifera, photo by S. Buchmann, University of Arizona, Tucson); sphinx moth (Hyles lineata, photo by W. May); yucca moths (Tegeticula yuccasella, photo by W. May); a fly (Bombyliidae, photo by D. Inouye, University of Maryland, College Park).

OCR for page 309
Status of Pollinators in North America PLATE 3 Lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris nivalis), a mammalian pollinator (photo © Merlin D. Tuttle, Bat Conservation International, reprinted with permission).

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Status of Pollinators in North America PLATE 4 Hummingbird, an avian pollinator (photo by W. May).