1. A reasonable intake would be two 3-ounce (cooked), or age-appropriate, servings but can safely consume 12 ounces per week;

  2. Can consume up to 6 ounces (or age-appropriate servings) of white (albacore) tuna per week;

  3. Should avoid large predatory fish such as shark, swordfish, tilefish, or king mackerel.

  1. Adolescent males, adult males, and females who will not become pregnant:

    1. May reduce their risk for cardiovascular disease by consuming seafood regularly, e.g., two 3-ounce servings per week;

    2. Who consume more than two servings a week should choose a variety of types of seafood to reduce the risk for exposure to contaminants from a single source;

  1. Adult males and females who are at risk of cardiovascular disease:

    1. May reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease by consuming seafood regularly, e.g., two 3-ounce servings per week;

    2. Although supporting evidence is limited, there may be additional benefits from including high-EPA/DHA seafood selections;

    3. Who consume more than two servings a week should choose a variety of types of seafood to reduce the risk for exposure to contaminants from a single source.

This information differs from the dietary guidance and advisories available from federal agencies and private organizations (see Chapter 2) in three important ways. First, the information combines benefit and risk information to yield coordinated statements. Second, the information comprehensively covers everyone in the population so that population groups are not left with uncertainties about which information applies to them. Third, while previous guidance has had tailored messages for people with a risk for cardiovascular disease (and to those with a history of such disease), the committee concludes that current scientific evidence suggests that the guidance for them is not materially different from that for the more general “adolescent males, adult males, and females who will not become pregnant” reflected above. For this reason the decision pathway that follows focuses on target populations 1–3 identified above. This suggested guidance should be reconsidered periodically as new data on risks and benefits associated with seafood consumption emerge.

The suggested guidance presented above is the endpoint of judgements about the important benefits and risks, as well as how they balance. The process of forming such guidance can be made more transparent with the use of tables that present the key considerations. Table 5-3 illustrates this



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