TABLE 6-2 Summary of Current Seafood Consumption Information Environment

 

Benefit/Risk Message

Source

Medium/Channel

Intended Audience(s)

Available Evaluation Evidence

Federal Advisories

Mercury risks

FDA, US EPA

Mass media, broadcast

Females of childbearing age, infants, and children

Insufficient evaluation of market impact

Suggestion of spillover effects, including possible stigmatization of seafood (Levy and Derby, 2000; Davidson, 2004)

State Advisories

Risks: 30 percent on mercury

State health and environmental agencies

Brochures, government websites, signs

Various

Evaluations suggest limited effectiveness

One-fifth to one-half of sports fishers are aware of state or local advisories in studies of advisory effectiveness (Burger and Waishwell, 2001; Anderson et al., 2004)

Regulated Point-of- Purchase Information

Nutritional information, country of origin, risk

Safeway, Albertson’s, Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, etc.

Point-of-purchase placards, shelf tags, pamphlets/brochures; individual food wrappers and stickers on the outside of food

All consumers

Suggestion that these displays can increase market share of product by 1–2 percent over 2 years (Cowburn and Stockley, 2003)

No specific evaluations of point-of-purchase displays of mercury in seafood; evaluations of point-of-purchase displays for seafood source suggest false claims are made regarding origin (Burger et al., 2004)

Labeling

Types of seafood and how much to consume; nutritional information and risks

Retailers

Point-of-purchase placards, shelf tags, pamphlets/brochures; individual food wrappers and stickers on the outside of food

All consumers

Most consumers claim to look at nutrition labels at least sometimes, but actual use is less widespread (Cowburn and Stockley, 2003)

No specific evaluation of seafood labels—limited labeling requirements



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement