TABLE 2-3 Proportion of Total Seafood Consumed on a Given Day, for Various Types of Seafood, 1999–2000

Rank

Seafood Type

Percent Consumed

1

Tuna

22.1

2

Shrimp

16.1

3

Salmon

8.9

4

Mix of fish

8.1

5

Crab

7.5

6

Cod

5.1

7

Flounder

4.5

8

Catfish

4.2

9

Don’t know type

3.4

10

Clams

2.4

SOURCE: DGAC, 2005.

ten seafood types were consistent, except that tilapia replaced scallops. The data represented in Table 2-1 does not take into account possible regional differences in seafood consumption. Rupp et al. (1980) reported that most regional differences in seafood consumption were attributable to freshwater and shellfish. Generally, consumption of freshwater species was greater in inland compared to coastal regions. Miller and Nash (1971) reported that overall shellfish consumption was greater in coastal regions, but the species consumed varied between northern and southern coastal areas, e.g., consumption of clams was greater in New England whereas consumption of oysters was greater in South Atlantic and Pacific states.

Another way of considering the top seafood is to compare the percentage of the population having eaten different types of seafood. In 1999–2000, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) queried respondents about their frequency of consumption of various seafood types in the previous 30 days. Table 2-2 provides a ranking of these by the percentage reporting consumption at least once. Consistent with the NMFS data, shrimp and tuna are the types consumed by the largest percentage of respondents, and crab, salmon, clams, catfish, scallops, and cod are included among the top choices. “Breaded fish” is not identified by type, and could represent some double-counting with other types, but is of interest for its relatively high use and caloric density.

Finally, another indication of the top types of seafood can be gleaned from the 1999–2000 NHANES 24-hour recalls of dietary intake. While respondents report seafood consumption in various ways—consumed with or without other ingredients added—the seafood portion alone can be examined by disaggregating all the ingredients using the US Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) FoodLink database. Table 2-3 provides the major types of seafood consumed in the United States, using food intake data from



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