Amount

Results

Conclusion**

 

Based on RCTs, no significant association was found between omega-3 intake and risk of total stroke based on a meta-analysis (RR=1.17, 95% CI 0.91-1.51) or sensitivity analysis (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.72-1.04).

N

Servings/week, a continuous variable

In the linear regression model, for each one-unit increase in servings/week of fish, the change in the risk ratio of total stroke is −0.20 (95% CI −0.06 to 0.027), but this is not significant.

In the quadratic regression model, for each one-unit increase in servings/week of fish, the change in the risk ratio of total stroke is 0.0037 (95% CI −0.0096 to 0.017), but this is not significant.

N

Categories of fish consumption:

1 = <1 time/month

2 = 1-3 times/month

3 = 1 time/week

4 = 2-4 times/week

5 = ≥5 times/week

Based on pooled RRs, those who consumed fish 1 time/week, 2-4 times/week, and ≥5 times/week had significantly lower RR of stroke compared to those who consumed fish <1 time/month (RR=0.87, 95% CI 0.77-0.98; RR=0.82, 95% CI 0.72-0.94; and RR=0.69, 95% CI 0.54-0.88, respectively); the RR was not significant for those who consumed fish 1-3 times/month compared to those who consumed fish <1 time/month.

Based on pooled RRs, those who consumed fish 1-3 times/month, 1 time/week, 2-4 times/week, and ≥5 times/week had significantly lower RR of ischemic stroke compared to those who consumed fish <1 time/month (RR=0.69, 95% CI 0.48-0.99; RR=0.68, 95% CI 0.52-0.88; RR=0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.87; and RR=0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.93, respectively).

There were no significant associations found between fish consumption and hemorrhagic stroke.

B



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