To balance the benefits and risks, the recommendations, as they apply to the target population groups 1–3, are arrayed in a decision pathway (shown in Figure S-1) that illustrates the committee’s resulting analysis of the balance between benefits and risks associated with seafood consumption.

BOX S-1

Population Groups and Appropriate Guidance

  1. Females who are or may become pregnant or who are breastfeeding:

    1. May benefit from consuming seafood, especially those with relatively higher concentrations of EPA and DHA;

    2. A reasonable intake would be two 3-ounce (cooked) servings but can safely consume 12 ounces per week;

    3. Can consume up to 6 ounces of white (albacore) tuna per week;

    4. Should avoid large predatory fish such as shark, swordfish, tilefish, or king mackerel.

  1. Children up to age 12:

    1. May benefit from consuming seafood, especially those with relatively higher concentrations of EPA and DHA;

    2. A reasonable intake would be two 3-ounce (cooked), or age-appropriate, servings but can safely consume 12 ounces per week;

    3. Can consume up to 6 ounces (or age-appropriate) of white (albacore) tuna per week;

    4. Should avoid large predatory fish such as shark, swordfish, tilefish, or king mackerel.

  1. Adolescent males, adult males, and females who will not become pregnant:

    1. May reduce their risk for cardiovascular disease by consuming seafood regularly, e.g., two 3-ounce servings per week;

    2. Who consume more than two servings a week should choose a variety of types of seafood to reduce the risk for exposure to contaminants from a single source.

  1. Adult males and females who are at risk of cardiovascular disease:

    1. May reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease by consuming seafood regularly, e.g., two 3-ounce servings per week;

    2. Although supporting evidence is limited, there may be additional benefits from including high EPA/DHA seafood selections;

    3. Who consume more than two servings a week should choose a variety of types of seafood to reduce the risk for exposure to contaminants from a single source.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement