Appendixes



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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts Appendixes

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE Jeff Benoit (Chair) earned his M.S. in coastal geology in 1978 from Georgia Institute of Technology/Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. He is the Director of Coastal and Marine Programs for SRA International. Prior to joining SRA in 2005 he was the Proprietor of J.R. Benoit Consulting. Mr. Benoit’s professional interests focus on coastal management, marine conservation, policy analysis, program assessment, and coastal hazard mitigation planning. He previously served as Director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management (OCRM) from 1993 to 2001. He was chair of NOAA’s Sustain Healthy Coasts strategic planning team from 1994 to 1997. Mr. Benoit also chaired one of five Working Groups established by the U.S. Coral Reef Task Force and coordinated drafting the National Action Plan to Conserve Coral Reefs. In his efforts to further global marine issues, Mr. Beniot has been involved with Integrated Coastal Management activities in China, Ireland, Jordan, Indonesia, and many Pacific and Caribbean Island communities. Prior to accepting his position at OCRM, he served as Coastal Geologist and later Director of the Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management Program. Mr. Benoit has served on the National Research Council’s committee on Restoration and Protection of Coastal Louisiana. C. Scott Hardaway received his M.S. in 1980 from the Department of Geology, East Carolina University. He is a Marine Scientist Supervisor for the Physical Sciences Department of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science at the College of William and Mary. Mr. Hardaway is primarily involved in process and response

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts of shoreline systems, which includes geomorphology of coastal change, wave mechanics and sediment transport, numerical modeling of hydrodynamic processes, shoreline change and shore protection, particularly breakwater and beach fill performance in Chesapeake Bay. He has worked on restoring and protecting wetlands from damage due to erosion and sea level rise in the Chesapeake Bay region. Mr. Hardaway has also contributed to the development of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ (Norfolk District) ecosystem restoration projects to protect and restore wetlands. These projects include areas such as Tangier Island and Saxis Island, Virginia. His professional memberships include the Virginia Board of Geology, North Carolina Board for Licensing of Geologists, and the American Society of Civil Engineers. Debra Hernandez received her M.S. in civil engineering from Clemson University in 1987. She is a professional engineer and her background is in coastal management and engineering. Ms. Hernandez is currently the President of Hernandez and Company, and worked previously as Director of Program and Policy Development for the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. She is an acknowledged leader in coastal management with 18 years of experience and extensive policy, legislative, and technical expertise. Ms. Hernandez’s expertise lies in federal and state coastal and environmental management laws, regulations and policies. She currently serves on the National Academies’ Ocean Studies Board and the Ocean Research and Resources Advisory Panel. Ms. Hernandez is also a founding board member and current vice-chair for the Coastal States Stewardship Foundation, whose purpose is to support healthy coasts and vibrant coastal communities. Additionally, she chaired the Coastal States Organization (CSO) from 2002 to 2004. CSO represents the interests of 35 governors from coastal states on federal activities relating to coastal management. Robert Holman earned his Ph.D. from Dalhousie University (Physical Oceanography) in 1979 and his B.S. in honors mathematics and physics from the Royal Military College at Kingston Canada in 1972. He is Professor at the College of Oceanic Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Holman’s research interests include beach processes; measurements of nearshore waves and currents; models of sandbar generation and morphology; application of remote sensing to nearshore processes, large-scale coastal behavior. He is currently performing research projects on the interactions of waves with nearshore morphology; measurement and modeling of sandbar morphology climatology; remote-sensing signatures in the nearshore. These are being completed for the Coastal Imaging Laboratory at Oregon State University, a laboratory that Dr. Holman has been developing since he joined Oregon State University in 1979. Dr. Holman has published more than 50 refereed papers encompassing theoretical, observation, and technical areas including recent papers on pattern formation in the nearshore; the statistics and kinematics of transverse sandbars on an open coast; and the

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts role of morphological feedback in surf zone sand bar response. He was recently appointed to a four-year term as the FY 2004 Secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Research Chair in Oceanographic Science. Dr. Holman has also served as a consultant for Navy Special Projects at Mitre Corporation; the National Science Foundation ad hoc committee for establishment of a coastal engineering program; the NSF Coastal Geology task force; several National Research Council committees; and many other professional and technical organizations. Evamaria Koch earned her Ph.D. in Marine Science from the University of South Florida in 1993. She is an Associate Professor at Horn Point Laboratory at the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. Dr. Koch’s research and areas of professional expertise include seagrass ecology, hydrodynamicallymediated processes in meadows of aquatic plants, seagrass habitat engineering, global changes in coastal plant systems, culture and micropropagation of marine macrophytes, and ecophysiology of marine plants. She has recently published on fluid dynamics in seagrass ecology, modeling seagrass density and distribution in response to changes in turbidity stemming from bivalve filtration and seagrass sediment stabilization, and habitat requirements for submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay. Dr. Koch’s research currently focuses on designing seagrass friendly structures to mitigate shoreline erosion and on the effect of global changes on seagrass communities. Neil McLellan holds a B.S. in civil engineering from the University of Texas and an M.S. in ocean engineering from Texas A&M University. He is a Senior Project Manager with Shiner Moseley and Associates. Mr. McLellan has been working in the Coastal Engineering field since his graduation from the University of Texas in 1981. His background includes research, detail design, project management, environmental enhancements, and public outreach for projects involving coastal engineering, shoreline protection, habitat creation, navigation, dredging, and dredged material placement. He has worked in the public and private sectors and has published over 40 technical papers on dredging, dredged material placement, wetlands creation, and coastal processes. Mr. McLellan has completed projects on shoreline protection along the Gulf of Mexico in Cameron Parish Louisiana; evaluated options, developed implementation, monitoring and design for innovative shoreline protection along the eastern Gulf Coast of Texas; served as the design engineer for Confined Disposal Facility to receive contaminated materials from a section of the Houston Ship Channel; was the Project Manager for determining feasibility of moving existing bayou from within operating chemical plant and locating outside the plant facility; and provided project management for development of detailed environmental assessment for innovative shoreline protection in Jefferson County, Texas. He is a registered professional engineer and currently serves as a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Texas Shore and Beach Association, and the Western Dredging Association.

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts Susan Peterson earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Hawaii. She currently works as a partner in the family consulting business Teal Partners, which she operates with her husband, John Teal. Dr. Peterson served at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution for over 10 years, specializing in ocean policy, and several years at Boston University in the same role. Most of her work was quantifying and qualifying commercial and recreational fishing effort so that the cultural, social, and economic motivations for fishing could be incorporated into fishery management decisions. In the mid-1980s, she left academia for industry and started Ecological Engineering Associates (EEA) that uses natural systems for wastewater treatment for private, industrial, and municipal customers. She retired from EEA in 1998 to partner her consulting firm. Dr. Peterson’s areas of expertise include wastewater treatment technology and policy; municipal and private finance for infrastructure, fisheries management (international and domestic); fisheries and aquaculture development and marketing; coastal zone management (international and domestic); ocean pollution effects on human health, coastal communities and industry; fishing communities, industry structure and infrastructure, fish pricing and markets, decision-making. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Wildlands Trust of Southeastern MA and is vice chair of the regional planning agency for southeastern Massachusetts. She also serves on the Greater New Bedford Workforce Investment Board. Dr. Peterson is also involved with and serves on committees of numerous regional and national conservation organizations. Denise Reed holds a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Cambridge. She is currently a Professor at the University of New Orleans. Dr. Reed’s research focuses on various aspects of sediment dynamics in coastal wetlands, with emphasis on sediment mobilization and marsh hydrology, both natural and altered, as factors controlling sediment deposition. She has participated in numerous research projects concerning marsh and estuarine sediment dynamics on the Gulf and Pacific coasts of the United States as well as in Europe and South America. Dr. Reed has also worked closely with the development of restoration plans in for coastal Louisiana for the last 15 years, being involved in incorporating science into efforts under the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) and more recently the Louisiana Coastal Area study. Dr. Reed has recently completed publications on altered hydrology effects on Louisiana salt marsh function and restoration of tidal wetlands in the Sacramento-San Joaquin delta. She currently serves on scientific advisory boards for ecosystem restoration in San Francisco Bay and Jamaica Bay, NY, as well as the CALFED program and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Daniel Suman holds a J.D. and Certificate in Environmental Law from the University of California at Berkeley and a Certificate of Latin American Studies from Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. in Chemical Oceanography

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California at San Diego. Dr. Suman is currently Professor of Marine Affairs and Policy at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS), University of Miami, as well as an Adjunct Professor in the School of Law. He teaches courses in Coastal Law, Environmental Law, Environmental Planning, and Coastal Management. Dr. Suman conducts research on the adaptability of the fishing sectors in Chile, Peru, and Ecuador to ENSO (“El Niño”) climate variability. This research involves analyses of changing positions of industrial fishing companies and labor unions, artisanal fishing unions, and government regulators in light of environmental uncertainty. He also has long-standing research interests in mangrove management in Latin American and Caribbean countries. Dr. Suman has organized international training workshops for mangrove managers and analyzes mangrove-related legislation in the Americas. His practical experience in Integrated Coastal Management extends from Panama to Brazil, Ururguay, Ecuador, Mexico, and Italy. Dr. Suman has served as the Articles Editor of the Ecology Law Quarterly and has been a fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. He is currently a member or the IUCN Commission on Environmental Law, the Marine Protected Areas Federal Advisory Committee, as well as the National Research Council’s Ocean Studies Board. STAFF Susan Roberts (Study Director) became the Director of the Ocean Studies Board in April 2004. Dr. Roberts received her Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She worked as a research scientist at the University of California, Berkeley and as a senior staff fellow at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Roberts’ past research experience has included deep sea biology, developmental cell biology, and cancer cytogenetics. She has directed a number of studies for the Ocean Studies Board including Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004); Decline of the Steller Sea Lion in Alaskan Waters: Untangling Food Webs and Fishing Nets (2003); Effects of Trawling & Dredging on Seafloor Habitat (2002); Marine Protected Areas: Tools for Sustaining Ocean Ecosystems (2001); Under the Weather: Climate, Ecosystems, and Infectious Disease (2001); Bridging Boundaries Through Regional Marine Research (2000); and From Monsoons to Microbes: Understanding the Ocean’s Role in Human Health (1999). Dr. Roberts specializes in the science and management of living marine resources. Sarah Capote earned her B.A. in history from the University of WisconsinMadison in the winter of 2001. She is a senior program assistant with the Ocean Studies Board. During her tenure with the Board, Ms. Capote worked on the following reports: Exploration of the Seas: Voyage into the Unknown (2003), Nonnative Oysters in the Chesapeake Bay (2004), Future Needs in Deep Sub-

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Mitigating Shore Erosion Along Sheltered Coasts mergence Science: Occupied and Unoccupied Vehicles in Basic Ocean Research (2004), the interim report for Elements of a Science Plan for the North Pacific Research Board (2004), A Vision for the International Polar Year 2007-2008 (2004), Marine Mammal Populations and Ocean Noise: Determining When Noise Causes Biologically Significant Effects (2005), Final Comments on the Science Plan for the North Pacific Research Board (2005), Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects (2005), Managing Coal Combustion Residues in Mines (2006), and A Review of the Draft Ocean Research Priorities Plan: Charting the Course for Ocean Science in the United States (2006).