Appendixes



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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs Appendixes

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Kenneth E. Eickmann, Chair (U.S. Air Force, retired), whose leadership accomplishments include having led the federal rescue and recovery efforts following the 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Building, served as the director of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin from June 1998 to October 2003. CII, a nonprofit research institute, is the principal national forum for the multitrillion-dollar-a-year construction industry. The more than100 member companies of the institute are dedicated to improving the cost, schedule, quality, safety, security, and operability of constructed facilities. CII annually funds $5 million in research at 30 U.S. universities to improve the total quality and cost effectiveness of the construction industry. General Eickmann’s recent accomplishments include selection as a distinguished engineering graduate of the University of Texas; selection for membership of the National Academy of Construction; selection as chairman of a General Officer Red Team, formed to review the logistics transformation efforts of the U.S. Air Force; and selection to serve on a National Research Council committee formed to evaluate the feasibility of achieving the science and technology requirements implied in the National Aerospace Initiative. He completed 22 assignments, including a stint from 1994 to 1996 as commander, Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center, Tinker Air Force Base. His last assignment on active duty was commander, Aeronautical Systems Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. As commander, he chaired a consortium partnering the U.S. Department of Defense, the aerospace industry, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to increase competitiveness in the aerospace industry. General Eickmann currently serves as the vice chairman of the Texas Engineers’ Task Force on Homeland Security and recently formed an executive placement company, The Eickmann Group, dedicated to the placement of retired military leaders in industry. General Eickmann earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from UT at Austin in 1967, an M.S. in systems engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1968, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan Executive Business Program and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, military systems acquisition, and systems engineering. Donald W. Bahr (NAE) was manager of the combustion technology operation at GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) for more than 20 years prior to his retirement. He joined GEAE in 1956 as a combustion research engineer. As manager of combustion technology, he was responsible for the design, development, and certification of a variety of combustion systems used in both commercial and military aircraft turbine engines as well as combustion systems used in industrial turbine engines. Mr. Bahr served as the GEAE representative on several national and international government-industry committees concerned with the promulgation of regulations for aircraft and industrial turbine engine emissions. Mr. Bahr holds six issued patents. Since 1994, he has been active as a consultant and has also served on several National Research Council committees. Mr. Bahr graduated from the University of Illinois with a B.S. degree in chemical engineering and from the Illinois Institute of Technology with M.S. degrees in chemical engineering and gas technology. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). He is a member of the General Electric

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs Propulsion Hall of Fame. His expertise is in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, gas turbine combustion, and fuels technologies. Dilip R. Ballal graduated from the Cranfield Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Currently, he is head of the Energy and Environmental Engineering Division at the University of Dayton. As division head, Dr. Ballal has overall responsibility for the direction and successful completion of basic and applied research in aerospace fuel science, fuels engineering, combustion, environmental engineering, modeling and simulation, and energy conservation. He joined the university in April 1983 as the leader of aerospace fuels and combustion group in the Research Institute. He has over 35 years of research experience in academia and industry. Dr. Ballal is also the Hans von Ohain Distinguished Professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the von Ohain Fuels and Combustion Center at the University of Dayton. His expertise in fuels, combustion, and emissions requirements of advanced propulsion systems has led to improvements in gas turbine combustor technology. Yvonne C. Brill (NAE) graduated from the University of Southern California with an M.S. in physical chemistry. She is currently a consultant specializing in satellite technology and space propulsion systems. After retiring from the International Maritime Satellite Organization (INMARSAT) in 1991, where she was propulsion manager for the INMARSAT–2 satellite system, she served from 1991 to 1994 as a member of several National Research Council committees evaluating pertinent space transportation systems. From 1994 to 2001 she was a member of the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel. She also provided extensive technical support services on communication satellites to Telenor (Oslo, Norway) and Shinawatra Satellite Co. Ltd. (Bangkok, Thailand) during their procurements of satellites in the United States. Earlier experience included working for a number of different corporations on the design and testing of ramjet and turbojet engines, launch vehicle and solid propulsion apogee motor stage selection, and the design and implementation of onboard propulsion for satellites. Ms. Brill is a fellow of the AIAA and the Society of Women Engineers (SWE). She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame. Among her awards are the AIAA 2002 Wyld Award in rocket propulsion, the IEEE 2002 Dr. Judith A. Resnik Award, and the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal in 2001. Her expertise is in space science, space astronautics, rocket/missile propulsion, and spacecraft/satellite propulsion. Dennis M. Bushnell (NAE) graduated from the University of Virginia with an M.S. in mechanical engineering. Mr. Bushnell is currently responsible for technical oversight and advanced program formulation for NASA Langley Research Center, with technical emphasis in atmospheric sciences and structures, materials, acoustics, flight electronics/control/software, instruments, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, hypersonic air-breathing propulsion, computational sciences and systems optimization for aeronautics, spacecraft, exploration and space access. He is a member/fellow of the National Academy of Engineering, ASME, AIAA, and the Royal Aeronautical Society. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and rocket propulsion engineering. Paul G. A. Cizmas graduated from Duke University with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and materials science. Dr. Cizmas is currently associate professor in the aerospace engineering department of Texas A&M University. Prior to joining Texas A&M he was a senior engineer/scientist at the Science and Technology Center of the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. His research interests concentrate on the numerical simulation of steady and unsteady transport phenomena for propulsion, fluid-solid interaction, combustion and computational fluid dynamics. His expertise is in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, and aerodynamics.

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs Charles H. Coolidge is vice president of Air Force programs at EADS North America Defense Company. He retired from the U.S. Air Force in 2004, with his last assignment as vice commander of headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The command conducts research, development, testing, and evaluation and provides the acquisition management and logistic support necessary for Air Force weapons systems to operate in peace and war. General Coolidge graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy in 1968 and has served in various operations and staff positions throughout his career. In operations, he served as a flight commander, operations officer, squadron commander, wing vice commander, wing commander, and director of operations and logistics. He has commanded three Air Force wings and served on the staffs of four major air commands. He also served on the Joint Staff and was the Joint Staff representative to the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Standing Consultative Commission, which met biannually in Geneva. General Coolidge is a command pilot with more than 4,100 flying hours. He has expertise in military systems acquisition. David E. Crow (NAE) graduated from the University of Missouri-Rolla with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Dr. Crow joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut as a distinguished professor-in-residence in the mechanical engineering department after a distinguished career in industry. He joined Pratt & Whitney in 1966, rising to the position of senior vice president of Pratt & Whitney's engineering organization, where he was responsible for the design, development, validation, and certification of all Pratt & Whitney large commercial engines, military engines, and rocket products. He also led the research and development of advanced technologies systems to meet future aircraft requirements. Dr. Crow previously held the position of senior vice president for Pratt & Whitney's large commercial engines organization, which included the PW4000 and JT9D high-thrust family of products. Dr. Crow is a past secretary of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and a member of both ASME and AIAA. In addition to having served as president of Pi Tau Sigma, he has served on the Engineering Advisory Board at Clarkson University and is an elected member of the Academy of Mechanical Engineers at the University of Missouri-Rolla. His expertise is in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and rocket propulsion engineering. Thomas W. Eagar (NAE) earned his Sc.D. in metallurgy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976. Dr. Eagar also completed the business administration program at Lehigh University and the program for senior executives. He has held numerous positions at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, including professor of materials engineering and engineering systems. Currently, he is the Thomas Lord Professor of Materials Engineering and Engineering Systems. His professional interests include materials processing and manufacturing; special interests in welding and joining of metals, ceramics, and electronic materials; deformation processing; alternative manufacturing processes; manufacturing management; materials systems analysis; selection of materials; and failure analysis. He is the recipient of many honors and awards; the most recent include a Silver Quill Award and the William Irrgang Award from the American Welding Society; a General Electric Distinguished Lecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and the Henry Marion Howe Medal from ASM International. His memberships include those in the NAE, the American Welding Society, the American Council of International Institutes of Welding, the Society of Automotive Engineers, the American Ceramic Society, the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the ASME, the American Society for Testing and Materials, and the Materials Research Society. Gerard W. Elverum Jr. (NAE) received a B.S. in physics from the University of Minnesota’s Institute of Technology, after which he carried out pioneering research on the physical properties, performance, and combustion characteristics of various liquid propellant combinations for rockets at Caltech’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He was also responsible for design and technology development programs on advanced rocket engines. In 1959, Mr. Elverum joined Space Technology Laboratories (STL) as section head of advanced propulsion. STL had systems engineering responsibility for the Air Force’s ballistic missile programs, and he worked on propulsion systems for the Atlas, Titan I and Titan II intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). In 1962 he evolved a unique design concept for deep-throttling liquid

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs bipropellant rocket engines. His patented concept was ultimately selected for the Lunar Module Descent Engine (LMDE) of the Apollo program. Mr. Elverum was STL’s program manager and chief engineer for LMDE from its inception through delivery of the first engine to Grumman in 1966. A fixed-thrust version of the LMDE was used to power the Delta stage of the Thor-Delta II launch vehicle. Over 12 years this engine accomplished 65 successful launches of many important national and international payloads. In 1972, Mr. Elverum initiated technology development of direct combustion-driven high-energy chemical lasers at TRW Space and Defense (formerly STL). During the next 18 years, three of the nation’s most powerful high-energy chemical lasers (NACL, MIRACL, and ALPHA) were developed under his direction. During the 10 years prior to his retirement in 1990, he was vice president and general manager of the Applied Technology Division of TRW's S&D. Mr. Elverum received a special achievement award from the ASME in 1971 and the Outstanding Engineering Merit Award from the Institute for the Advancement of Engineering in 1972. In 1973 he won the James H. Wyld propulsion award from the AIAA. Mr. Elverum was made a fellow of the AIAA in 1983 and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1987. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, systems engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, rocket missile propulsion, and satellite/spacecraft propulsion. Carl E. Franklin is an independent consultant and president of International Falcon Associates, Inc. General Franklin retired from the U.S. Air Force in 1998 when he was commander of the 9th Air Force and U.S. Central Air Forces (USCENTAF)—a command of six wings with more than 350 aircraft and 36,000 personnel. As the air component commander for U.S. Central Command, he was responsible for developing contingency plans and conducting air operations in an area of responsibility stretching from Kenya across the Arabian Peninsula and Southwest Asia, including Iraq, to Pakistan. General Franklin was commissioned as a distinguished graduate of Texas Tech University’s Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps program. He commanded a fighter test and evaluation squadron, a tactical reconnaissance wing, an air warfare center under Air Combat Command, and the Joint Task Force Southwest Asia, where he directed coalition air operations over Iraq. His staff experience included two tours at Headquarters U.S. Air Force and an assignment at a major North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) command headquarters, where he was the senior officer directing an international staff from eight nations. A command pilot with some 3,780 hours in fighter and trainer aircraft, he has expertise in military systems acquisition and aircraft propulsion. Frank C. Gillette, Jr., received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Florida. Mr. Gillette retired from Pratt & Whitney in 1998, after 36 years of service, and now actively consults with Pratt & Whitney Large Military Engines, also performing reviews of Sikorsky helicopters and assessing damage tolerance of their aircraft. During his time at Pratt & Whitney, he played a major role in designing and developing almost every engine that powers the U.S. Air Force front-line fighter aircraft. As director of the F119 engine, he was responsible for the JAFE, YF-119, and F119 EMD programs. During these programs, he developed a thrust vectoring supercruise engine for the U.S. Air Force’s new F-22 Raptor fighter. Mr. Gillette is currently a consultant for United Technologies and Belcan Corporation and participates in the final design reviews for the Belcan Corporation. He is active at the University of Florida and recently completed the search for dean of engineering and is on the Engineering Advisory Committee of the University of Florida Foundation board of directors. He is an active fellow in the ASME and an associate fellow of the AIAA. His expertise is in military systems acquisition, propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, and space science. Edward M. Greitzer (NAE) graduated from Harvard University with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Dr. Greitzer is currently the H.N. Slater Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His professional interests include aeropropulsion, internal flow, gas turbines, active control of aeromechanical systems, robust design of gas turbine engines, and fluid machinery. A

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs member of the NAE and the ASME, he is an expert in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, and aerodynamics. Jeffrey W. Hamstra graduated from the University of Michigan with an M.S. in aerospace engineering. Mr. Hamstra is currently a Lockheed Martin fellow in propulsion integration and is responsible for providing technical consultation and guidance, conducting program reviews, and ensuring technical integrity in the propulsion discipline across the entire Lockheed Martin aero enterprise. He has 20 years of experience in jet propulsion systems integration at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company and its Heritage organizations, including program experience from F-16, F-22, F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Skunk Works Advanced Development Programs. He has performed as an R&D principal investigator, aircraft project lead, and function department manager. He is familiar with U.S. aircraft engine industry, government propulsion organizations, and propulsion technology programs and has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and aircraft propulsion. He was inducted as a Lockheed Martin fellow in 2003. Bernard L. Koff (NAE) is an engineering pioneer whose leadership in the gas turbine industry produced a host of innovative breakthroughs in design and development. With GE and Pratt & Whitney, from which he retired as executive vice president of engineering and technology, his contributions impacted the design and development of over half of all jet engines flying. Mr. Koff also led the design and development of the oxygen and hydrogen high-pressure pumps to replace the Rocketdyne units on the space shuttle main engine. His patents and highly regarded technical papers cover the entire spectrum of jet engine design and manufacturing technology. Honors and awards include the ASME/AIAA/SAE Daniel Guggenheim Medal, the Air Force Association’s Theodore von Karman Award, AIAA Reed Aeronautics Award (its highest), AIAA Air Breathing Propulsion Award, AIAA Engineer of the Year, AIAA & SAE Littlewood Lecture Award, ASME Tom Sawyer Award, SAE Franklin Kolk Award, the GE Perry Egbert Award, and the P&W George Mead Medal. He is a fellow of the ASME, AIAA, and SAE. Mr. Koff is a former member of the ASEB and served on three NRC committees. His expertise is in propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and rocket propulsion engineering. Mitsuru Kurosaka received a B.S. and an M.S. from the University of Tokyo and a Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology. After graduation from Caltech in 1968, he worked in the industry, first at AiResearch Mfg. Co. and then at General Electric R&D Center. Since 1987, he has been a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, University of Washington, Seattle. His interests are thermofluid problems related to air-breathing propulsion. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, and aircraft propulsion. D. Brian Landrum graduated from North Carolina State University with a Ph.D. in aerospace. Dr. Landrum is currently an associate professor at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering. His professional activities and affiliations include the AIAA, the American Helicopter Society, Phi Kappa Phi, and Sigma Gamma Tau. Recent honors and awards include National Faculty Advisor of the Year (AIAA), associate fellow (AIAA), Outstanding Student Group Advisor (UAH), and the Alabama-Mississippi Section Professional of the Year (AIAA). He has expertise in aerodynamics, rocket propulsion engineering, rocket missile propulsion, and satellite/spacecraft propulsion. Ivett Leyva graduated from the California Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in aeronautics. Dr. Leyva is currently a senior aerodynamicist at Microcosm, Inc. She is responsible for coordinating and performing numerical and analytical studies for the design of the DARPA FALCON program launch vehicle and designs hardware for rocket engine subcomponents. Prior to her current position, Dr. Leyva was a thermal sciences engineer for Exponent, where she investigated the cause, origin, and future

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs prevention of aviation accidents as well as fires and explosions, from the residential to the industrial scales. Her expertise is in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, and rocket propulsion engineering. Lourdes Q. Maurice received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of London’s Imperial College. Dr. Maurice is currently the chief scientific and technical advisor for the environment in the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Environment and Energy. She serves as the agency technical expert for basic and exploratory research and advanced technology development focused on aircraft environmental impacts and the application of such technology to noise and emissions certification. She previously served as the Air Force deputy, basic research sciences and propulsion science and technology, in the Office of the Deputy Associate Secretary of the Air Force for Science and Technology. In this position she managed the $220 million per year basic research sciences and $240 million per year propulsion science and technology portfolios at the Air Force secretariat. Dr. Maurice also worked at the AFRL's Propulsion and Power Directorate from 1983 to 1999, planning and executing basic, exploratory, and advanced development propulsion science and technology programs focusing on state-of-the-art aviation fuels and propulsion systems. Dr. Maurice is serving a second term on the AIAA Propellants and Combustion Technical Committee. She has authored over 80 publications and is a fellow of the AIAA, as well as a member of the Tau Beta Pi Honorary Engineering Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the American Chemical Society (ACS). She has expertise in aircraft propulsion, propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, military systems acquisition, and systems engineering. Neil E. Paton (NAE) graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in materials science. Currently, he is the chief technology advisor and chairman of the Technology Advisory Board at Liquidmetal Technologies, where he has worked since March 2002. Prior to joining Liquidmetal, he served for 12 years as vice president of technology for Howmet Corporation and as president of Howmet Research Corporation, which developed products, processes, and materials for gas turbines. He also worked in materials development and advanced engineering for 20 years at Rockwell International, where he was involved in numerous programs, including the space shuttle program and the National Aerospace Plane program. He has experience in propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, aircraft propulsion and rocket/missile propulsion. Lawrence P. Quinn graduated from Michigan State University with a Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry. He was employed for 38 years at the AFRL at Edwards Air Force Base, where he was involved in developing advanced propellants; producing physics-based combustion; and rocket exhaust plume models; planning air-launched missile and research technology programs; developing carbon/carbon nozzle technology; and guiding engineering analysis. He also served as acting division chief of several divisions and ended his career as associate technical director of the Space and Missile Systems Division. Currently, Dr. Quinn is director of Southern California Operations at Aerojet. He is responsible for the development of business with the AFRL at Edwards and Kirtland Air Force Bases, the Naval Air Weapons Center, JPL, and other government organizations in southern California. His expertise is in rocket boost and satellite/spacecraft and missile propulsion. Eli Reshotko (NAE) graduated from the California Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in aeronautics and physics. Dr. Reshotko is currently the Kent H. Smith Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He was elected to the NAE in 1984 and is a fellow of the following societies: AIAA, ASME, the American Physical Society, and the American Academy of Mechanics, which he served as president. He is co-author of over 100 publications and is affiliated with many task forces, committees, and governing boards, several of which he served as chair. His area of expertise is viscous effects in external and internal aerodynamics; two- and three-dimensional compressible boundary layers and heat transfer; stability and transition of viscous flows, both incompressible and compressible;

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs and low-drag technology for aircraft and underwater vehicles. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, and aircraft propulsion. Kenneth M. Rosen (NAE) graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and is a graduate of the Advanced Management Program at the Harvard University Business School. Dr. Rosen has over 43 years of experience in the aerospace and turbo machinery community, much of it at the leadership level. Dr. Rosen is a founding partner of Aero-Science Technology Associates, LLC (ASTA). ASTA is an engineering and business development consulting firm established to service both government and industry customers. For the last 4 years, Dr. Rosen managed his own consulting firm, General Aero-Science Consultants LLC, and served as corporate president of ConceptsNREC, a turbomachinery research company, from 2000 to 2002. Prior to this he spent over 38 years with United Technologies Corporation. Beginning his career in propulsion and aerothermodynamics at Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, he quickly moved to Sikorsky Aircraft, were he held many important engineering and management positions, including vice president of research and engineering and advanced programs, directing such advanced technology projects as the Comanche, S-92 (2003 Collier trophy winner), Cypher (UAVs), and the Black Hawk and X-Wing helicopters. During this period he managed all of Sikorsky’s research, development, design, ground/flight testing, and systems engineering efforts. Dr. Rosen was also responsible for all of the company’s advanced products and low-observable activities. His professional expertise includes product/business development, program management, helicopter/V/STOL design, turbomachinery, systems integration, low observable technology, propulsion systems, transmission design, pneumodynamics, icing, aerothermodynamics, and systems engineering. Dr. Rosen is an elected member of the NAE and a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society, the SAE, AIAA, and the American Helicopter Society. He has been chairman of the board of the Rotorcraft Industry Technology Association, chairman of the UTC Engineering Coordination Steering Committee and the AIA Rotorcraft Advisory Group. Additionally, he is a longtime member of NASA’s Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology Advisory Committee, the SAE Aerospace Council, and the NRC panel that assessed air and ground vehicle technology at the ARL. Dr. Rosen holds five U.S. patents and has written numerous papers on helicopter design, product development, propulsion, aero-thermodynamics, icing, and systems engineering. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, military systems acquisition, systems engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, aircraft propulsion, and aircraft propulsion. Robert L. Sackheim (NAE) received a B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Virginia and an M.S. in chemical engineering from Columbia University. He taught propulsion courses at UCLA, and is teaching a flight propulsion course at the UAH. He has published over 250 papers and currently holds 9 patents. Mr. Sackheim recently retired (mid-May 2006) as the assistant director and chief engineer for propulsion at NASA’s MSFC, where he served about 7 years. Prior to his NASA service, he spent 35 years as a TRW (now Northrop-Grumman) employee in key engineering, technical leadership, and management positions. His last position at TRW was director of the Propulsion and Combustion Systems Center. His recent awards and honors include several MSFC Director’s Commendations, the Presidential Rank Award for Meritorius Executive Service, the Martin Schilling Award for Management, the Hermann Oberth Award for Outstanding Achievement in Astronautics, the AIAA Holgar Toftoy for Outstanding Technical Leadership, the NASA Medal for Outstanding Technical Leadership, the AIAA Sustained Service Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Institute, the AIAA Wyld Propulsion Award, and he has also received three annual chairmen’s awards for outstanding technical contributions from TRW. He has also received patent of the year award and recognition from the Association of Aeronautics and Astronautics of France in recognition of the high quality of his contributions to the propulsion community. His professional and honorary society affiliations include membership of Sigma Xi and a fellow of AIAA. He was chairman of the AIAA Liquid Propulsion Technical Committee, the Los Angeles section of he AIAA, and the Mississippi/Alabama section of the AIAA, and has served on numerous committees and advisory boards. He is a member of the NAE. He was selected for membership on this committee due to his expertise in space science, space astronautics, rocket/missile propulsion,

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A Review of United States Air Force and Department of Defense Aerospace Propulsion Needs spacecraft/satellite propulsion, propulsion engineering, materials science, and engineering, and thermodynamics. Ben T. Zinn (NAE) received a Ph.D. in aerospace and mechanical sciences from Princeton University. He is currently the holder of the David S. Lewis Jr. Chair and is a Regents’ Professor at the School of Aerospace Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research areas include control of combustion processes, combustion instabilities, propulsion, acoustics, microscale combustion, and energy conversion systems. Dr. Zinn has published nearly 400 papers and reports and holds 9 patents in these fields. Additionally, he has edited two AIAA progress volumes on combustion diagnostics and has contributed chapters on pulse combustion to several books. Dr. Zinn is currently the director of NASA’s URETI Center on Aeropropulsion and Power. He formerly served as director of the Army MURI on intelligent turbine engines. Dr. Zinn has also served on several Air Force boards dealing with propulsion issues. Dr. Zinn’s honors include membership in the NAE; ASME’s International Gas Turbine Institute Aircraft Engine Technology Award, 2005; honorary professor, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Fellow of the ASME and AIAA; the Alfred C. Egerton Gold Medal of the Combustion Institute, 2002; AIAA Air-Breathing Propulsion Award, 2003; AIAA Pendray Aerospace Literature Award, 2000; AIAA Propellants and Combustion Award, 1996; and Georgia Tech’s Distinguished Professor Award, 1990. He has expertise in air-breathing and rocket propulsion systems, combustion, combustion instabilities, active control of combustion processes, and acoustics.