APPENDIX
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Irwin Feller (Chair) is senior visiting scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also emeritus professor of economics at the Pennsylvania State University, where he served on the faculty for more than three decades, including 24 years as director of the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation. His current research interests include the economics of science, the evaluation of federal and state technology programs, and the university’s role in technology-based economic development. He has been a consultant to the President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, as well as numerous other government and private-sector organizations. He has served on several committees for the National Research Council, including the committee on international benchmarking of U.S. science and manufacturing modernization. He has a B.A. in economics from the City University of New York and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota.


Wendy Baldwin is executive vice president for research at the University of Kentucky. Previously she was director of the Poverty, Youth and Gender program at the Population Council in New York. From 1993 to 2002, as deputy director for extramural research at the National Institutes of Health, Baldwin advised the director on extramural policy issues and was responsible for developing and overseeing policies and procedures for extramural research and training programs. Before that, Baldwin had a 20-year period of service to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She has received many awards and distinctions, including a National Public Service Award. She has served on the American Association for the



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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging APPENDIX Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Irwin Feller (Chair) is senior visiting scientist at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is also emeritus professor of economics at the Pennsylvania State University, where he served on the faculty for more than three decades, including 24 years as director of the Institute for Policy Research and Evaluation. His current research interests include the economics of science, the evaluation of federal and state technology programs, and the university’s role in technology-based economic development. He has been a consultant to the President’s Office of Science and Technology Policy, as well as numerous other government and private-sector organizations. He has served on several committees for the National Research Council, including the committee on international benchmarking of U.S. science and manufacturing modernization. He has a B.A. in economics from the City University of New York and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota. Wendy Baldwin is executive vice president for research at the University of Kentucky. Previously she was director of the Poverty, Youth and Gender program at the Population Council in New York. From 1993 to 2002, as deputy director for extramural research at the National Institutes of Health, Baldwin advised the director on extramural policy issues and was responsible for developing and overseeing policies and procedures for extramural research and training programs. Before that, Baldwin had a 20-year period of service to the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. She has received many awards and distinctions, including a National Public Service Award. She has served on the American Association for the

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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging Advancement of Science’s Committee on Nominations. At the National Research Council, she served on the Panel on Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing. She has a bachelor’s degree in sociology (magna cum laude) from Stetson University and master’s and doctorate degrees from the University of Kentucky. Paul B. Baltes is director of the Center of Lifespan Psychology at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, and professor of psychology at the Free University of Berlin. He is known for his contributions to (a) creating the field of life-span psychology, (b) the psychological study of wisdom, (c) research on cognitive aging and the plasticity of the aging mind, (d) social scenarios concerning the future of old age and an aging society, and (e) the articulation and testing of models of successful development and aging. For his work, Baltes has been honored with numerous awards, including honorary doctorates (Jyväskylä, Stockholm, Geneva) and election as a foreign member to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. In 2000, Baltes was elected to the Order Pour le Mérite of the Sciences and the Arts. He has a doctorate from the University of Saarland (Saarbrücken, Germany, 1967). Richard De Veaux is professor of mathematics and statistics at Williams College. An applied statistician, he has been studying competing methods that can be used on problems in science that include artificial neural networks, as well as such techniques as trees, MARS, and MART and the application of these tools to large data sets, often called data mining. He has been a consultant for over 15 years for such companies as Hewlett-Packard, Alcoa, and other private-sector organizations. He has taught at the Wharton School and the Princeton University School of Engineering. His numerous teaching awards include a Lifetime Award for Dedication and Excellence in Teaching from the Engineering Council at Princeton. In 1998 he was elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association. He has a B.S.E. in civil engineering and an A.B. in mathematics from Princeton University and an M.A. in dance education and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. James S. Jackson is the Daniel Katz distinguished university professor of psychology and professor of health behavior and health education in the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, as well as director and research professor of the Institute for Social Research. He has conducted research and international, comparative studies on immigration, race and ethnic relations, physical and mental health, adult development and aging, attitudes and attitude change, and African American politics. He has served as national president of the Black Students Psychological Association and the Association of Black Psychologists. He is a member of the Institute of

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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging Medicine. He received the 2007 James McKeen Cattell fellow award from the Association for Psychological Science. He is currently directing the most extensive social, political behavior, and health surveys on the American and Caribbean populations ever conducted. He has a Ph.D. from Wayne State University. Janice Kiecolt-Glaser is professor of psychiatry and psychology in the Ohio State University College of Medicine, director of the Division of Health Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry, and a member of the Behavioral Medicine Research Institute. Working in the area of psychoneuroimmunology, her research, mostly in collaboration with Ronald Glaser, has demonstrated important health consequences of stress, including slower wound healing and impaired vaccine responses in older adults; in addition, their programmatic work has focused on the ways in which personal relationships influence immune and endocrine function and health. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of the American Psychological Association, and she received an Award for Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology from the American Psychological Association, among other honors. She has served on the National Institute of Mental Health’s Mental Health and AIDS study section. She has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oklahoma (1972) and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Miami (1976). Robert E. Kohler is professor of the history and sociology of science at the University of Pennsylvania. His interests include the history of science, medicine, and technology in 19th- and 20th-century Europe and America, and more recently the history and sociology of scientific practice, environmental history, environmental science, and the cultural history of science in Europe and the United States. He has been at the University of Pennsylvania since 1973. In addition to work on the culture and practices of field biology, he has also written on the history of foundations’ patronage of science. He has a Ph.D. in organic chemistry from Harvard University. Michèle Lamont is Robert I. Goldman professor of European studies and professor of sociology and African and African-American studies at Harvard University. She taught at Princeton University for 15 years before joining the Harvard faculty in 2003. She has written on the role of culture in generating social inequality; the cultural strategies of stigmatized groups for coping with racism; culture and poverty; how culture mediates the impact of discrimination on health; and many other topics. She received the C. Wright Mills Award from the Society for the Study of Social Problems. She is the current chair of the Council for European Studies, co-director of the Successful Societies Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Studies, and

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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging director of the European Network on Inequality of the Multidisciplinary Program on Inequality and Social Policy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. A Canadian, she has a B.A. and an M.A. in political science from Ottawa University and a Ph.D. from the Université de Paris (1983). Leah L. Light is professor of psychology at Pitzer College. Her research interests lie in memory and aging, with a particular focus on differentiating aspects of memory that are relatively preserved in old age from those that are more affected. She has been a fellow at the Andrew Norman Institute of the Andrus Gerontology Center at the University of Southern California. Her research has been supported by grants from the National Institute on Aging, including a MERIT award, since 1981. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Gerontological Society of America, as well as a member of the Psychonomic Society and the Memory Disorders Research Society. She served a six-year term as editor of Psychology and Aging and is a past president of the adulthood and aging division of the American Psychological Association. She has a B.A. in psychology from Wellesley College and a Ph.D. from Stanford University. Daniel McFadden is the E. Morris Cox professor of economics and director of the Econometrics Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on a variety of topics in economics and choice theory, almost all having their origins in applied problems. In recent years, his research has concentrated on deviations from the economic theory of choice, found particularly in experiments in cognitive psychology and their implications for economic analysis and the interpretation of economic data. With support from the National Institute on Aging, he has been working on the economic status of elderly Americans, looking at such questions as the adequacy of housing arrangements, financial planning, and the delivery and cost of health services. In 1981 he was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and in 2000 he received the Nobel Prize in Economics. At the National Research Council, he has served on numerous committees, including the Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics and the Committee on Methods of Forecasting Demand and Supply of Doctoral Scientists and Engineers. He has a B.S. in physics (with high distinction, 1957) and a Ph.D. in behavioral science (economics, 1962) from the University of Minnesota. Gary Sandefur is dean of the College of Letters and Science and a professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He is a social demographer known for his work on American Indians, race and ethnicity, families, poverty and inequality, and public policy. He has received

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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging federal and state grants for research in a number of areas, including training programs for American Indians, poverty and social policy, migration, and family disruption, and was the principal investigator on a grant from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Social Capital and Adolescent Well-Being, part of the NICHD Family and Child Well-Being Research Network. He served as a member of the National Research Council–Institute of Medicine Board of Children, Youth, and Families. He has a B.S. in sociology from the University of Oklahoma (1974) and a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University (1978). Paul C. Stern (Study Director) is a senior staff officer at the National Research Council and study director of the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. His research interests include the determinants of environmentally significant behavior, particularly at the individual level, participatory processes for informing environmental decision making, and the governance of environmental resources and risks. He is the coauthor or coeditor of Decision Making for the Environment: Social and Behavioral Science Research Priorities (2005), Environmental Problems and Human Behavior (2002), The Drama of the Commons (2002), and The Aging Mind: Opportunities in Cognitive Research (2000). Stern is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Psychological Association. He has a B.A. from Amherst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Clark University, all in psychology.. Shripad Tuljapurkar is a professor of biological science and Dean and Virginia Morrison professor of population studies at Stanford University. He is also president of Mountain View Research. His research includes the dynamics and evolution of human and nonhuman populations, the sensitivity and extinction dynamics in the presence of disturbance, population aging and age structural transitions, and the evolution of senescence. He is a member of the Center for the Economics and Demography of Aging at the University of Southern California, Berkeley. He has an M.Sc. in physics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, and a Ph.D. in environmental science from Portland State University. George E. Walker is a senior scholar at the Carnegie Foundation, where he directs the Carnegie Initiative on the Doctorate. Walker joined the foundation in January 2001; he also retains his duties at Indiana University as vice president for research and dean of the University Graduate School. Walker is active in many of the national organizations related to graduate education and research administration. Recent positions include chair of the Council of Graduate Schools (1995), chair of the Midwest Association of Graduate Schools (1996), president of the Association of American Universities As-

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A Strategy for Assessing Science: Behavioral and Social Research on Aging sociation of Graduate Schools (1997), and chair of National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges Council on Research Policy and Graduate Education (1997-1998). A theoretical physicist, he has a bachelor’s degree from Wesleyan University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Case Institute of Technology. Carol Weiss is the Beatrice B. Whiting professor of education policy at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research deals with evaluation, the uses of research in policy making, and the influence of ideology, interests, information, and institutional rules and structures on policy. Her two newest research studies deal with decision making by the Massachusetts State Board of Education on high-stakes testing and with federal, state, and school district decision making on drug abuse prevention education. She has served on nine panels of the National Research Council, as well as on advisory committees to the Directorate for Education and Human Resources of the National Science Foundation, the Annenberg Challenge, the World Bank, the Environmental Protection Agency, the International Development Research Center (Canada), UNESCO, the National Center for Education Statistics, the Rand Corporation, the Government Accountability Office’s Program Evaluation and Methodology Division, and others. A sociologist, she has a Ph.D. from Columbia University. David A. Wise is the Stambaugh professor of political economy at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He is also the area director of Health and Retirement Programs and director of the Program on the Economics of Aging at the National Bureau of Economic Research, as well as a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. He has written extensively about the saving effects of personal retirement programs—such as individual retirement accounts and 401(k) plans in the United States—and, more recently, has been evaluating the implications of the rapid spread of these programs, which now are the dominant form of saving for retirement in the Unites States. He is currently engaged in analysis of the retirement incentives in public social security programs around the world. He has a B.A. from the University of Washington and an M.A. in statistics and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.