B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Dr. John A. Armstrong, Chair, received his Ph.D. in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance from Harvard University in 1961. Dr. Armstrong spent most of his career at IBM, until he retired as vice president of science and technology. He is the author or co-author of some 60 papers on nuclear resonance, nonlinear optics, the photon statistics of lasers, picosecond pulse measurements, the multiphoton spectroscopy of atoms, the management of research in industry, and issues of science and technology policy. As a result of his contributions in nonlinear optics, quantum physics, and technical leadership in advanced very-large-scale integration technology, Dr. Armstrong was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1987. In addition, he received the George E. Pake Prize of the American Physical Society (APS) in 1989. Dr. Armstrong was a member of the presidentially appointed National Advisory Committee on Semiconductors. He was also a member of the National Science Board from 1996 to 2002 and served on its Special Commission on the Future of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Armstrong has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) bodies, including the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, where he was liaison to the Computer Science and Technology Board; he chaired the Committee on Partnerships in Weather and Climate Services and the Committee on Future Needs in Deep Submergence Science. Dr. Armstrong serves as chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for the NSF Engineering Research Center



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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Dr. John A. Armstrong, Chair, received his Ph.D. in the field of nuclear magnetic resonance from Harvard University in 1961. Dr. Armstrong spent most of his career at IBM, until he retired as vice president of science and technology. He is the author or co-author of some 60 papers on nuclear resonance, nonlinear optics, the photon statistics of lasers, picosecond pulse measurements, the multiphoton spectroscopy of atoms, the management of research in industry, and issues of science and technology policy. As a result of his contributions in nonlinear optics, quantum physics, and technical leadership in advanced very-large-scale integration technology, Dr. Armstrong was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1987. In addition, he received the George E. Pake Prize of the American Physical Society (APS) in 1989. Dr. Armstrong was a member of the presidentially appointed National Advisory Committee on Semiconductors. He was also a member of the National Science Board from 1996 to 2002 and served on its Special Commission on the Future of the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Armstrong has served on numerous National Research Council (NRC) bodies, including the Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications, where he was liaison to the Computer Science and Technology Board; he chaired the Committee on Partnerships in Weather and Climate Services and the Committee on Future Needs in Deep Submergence Science. Dr. Armstrong serves as chair of the Industrial Advisory Board for the NSF Engineering Research Center

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences “Collaborative Adaptive Sensing of the Atmosphere” located at University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Dr. Susan K. Avery is vice chancellor and dean at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Dr. Avery received her Ph.D. in atmospheric science from the University of Illinois. She served as assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana; professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Colorado; and associate dean of research and graduate education, College of Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, and director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences. Dr. Avery has broad interests in upper-atmosphere dynamics, Doppler-radar techniques for observing the atmosphere, and the application of weather and climate information for decision support. From 2002 to 2003, she assisted the U.S. Climate Change Science Program in drafting its strategic plan; she was particularly instrumental in shaping the chapter on decision support, a new emphasis for the program. Dr. Avery is the current president of the American Meteorological Society (AMS), a member of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), and a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. She is a past officer of the University Corporation of Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Dr. Avery receives research support from NSF and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Dr. Howard B. Bluestein is a George Lynn Cross Research Professor of Meteorology at the University of Oklahoma, where he has served since 1976. He received his Ph.D. in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests are the observation and physical understanding of weather phenomena on convective, mesoscale, and synoptic scales. Dr. Bluestein is a fellow of the AMS and of the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies. He is chair of the NSF Observing Facilities Advisory Panel, the past chair of the AMS Committee on Severe Local Storms and UCAR’s Scientific Program Evaluation Committee, a past member of the AMS Board of Meteorological and Oceanographic Education in Universities, and a former member of the NRC Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate (BASC). He is also the author of a textbook on synoptic-dynamic meteorology and of Tornado Alley, a book for the scientific layperson on severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. Dr. Bluestein receives research support from NSF. Dr. Elbert W. (Joe) Friday is the WeatherNews Chair Emeritus of Applied Meteorology and Director Emeritus of the Sasaki Institute at the University of Oklahoma. Most recently, he was director of the NRC BASC from 1998 to 2002, and senior scholar from 2002 to 2003. In the previous year, he

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences served as the assistant administrator for research for NOAA. From 1988 to 1997, he was director of the National Weather Service, serving during its extensive modernization. During this same period, he served as the U.S. Permanent Representative to the World Meteorological Organization. Dr. Friday completed a 20-year career in the U.S. Air Force, retiring in 1981 as a colonel. He is a fellow and past president of the AMS and a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Sciences, the National Weather Association, and the research society Sigma Xi. He has been awarded the Presidential Rank Award of Meritorious Executive, the Distinguished Graduate Award from the University of Oklahoma, where he received a Ph.D. in Meteorology in 1969, and the 1993 Federal Executive of the Year Award from the Federal Executive Institute Alumni Association. He received the 1997 Cleveland Abbe Award for Outstanding Service from AMS. Dr. Marvin A. Geller is a professor of atmospheric sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. His research deals with atmospheric dynamics, middle and upper atmosphere, climate variability, and aeronomy. Dr. Geller has served on many national and international advisory committees on atmospheric science, the upper atmosphere, and the near-space environment, and is currently president of the Scientific Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Physics (SCOSTEP); the NSF’s Division of Atmospheric Sciences pays dues to SCOSTEP through BASC. His past NRC service includes a 2003 Review of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Sciences Enterprise Strategic Plan; membership on BASC, the Committee on Metrics for Global Change Research, and the Committee on Solar and Space Physics; and chair of the Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research. He is a fellow of AMS, a fellow of AGU, and past president of AGU’s Atmospheric Sciences Section. Dr. Geller receives research funding from NSF and NASA. Dr. Elisabeth A. Holland obtained her Ph.D. from Colorado State University in 1988, followed by a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. She has worked in the Atmospheric Chemistry Division at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) since 1989, focusing on linkages between atmospheric chemistry and terrestrial ecosystems. She has combined modeling and measurements to examine interactions between the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycles, ranging from initial endeavors in microbiology to her current focus on global and regional biogeochemistry. Dr. Holland directed the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Soils and Global Change, was an associate editor for the Journal of Geophysical Research, a fellow with both the Natural Resources Ecology Laboratory (Colorado State University) and the Institute for Arctic and Alpine Ecology

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences (University of Colorado), and serves on a number of steering committees including the International Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution and NCAR’s Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric and Related Sciences program, which provides research opportunities to minority students. Dr. Holland is a member of the graduate faculty at Colorado State University and the University of Colorado, and has also worked with students from Stanford University, the University of California at Berkeley, State University of New York, Stony Brook, and the University of New Hampshire. From 1999 to 2001, she was C3 Professor and Atmospheric Chemistry Group Leader for the Max Planck Institute of Biogeochemistry in Jena, Germany. Dr. Charles E. Kolb received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in physical chemistry. Dr. Kolb is president and chief executive officer of Aerodyne Research, Inc. in Billerica, Massachusetts. Aerodyne is a private company that receives research support from many government agencies, including NSF. Dr. Kolb’s principle research interests have included atmospheric and environmental chemistry, combustion chemistry, materials chemistry, and the chemical physics of rocket and aircraft exhaust plumes. He has served on several NASA panels dealing with environmental issues, as well as on several previous NRC committees and boards dealing with atmospheric and environmental chemistry. These include the NRC’s BASC, the Committee to Review NARSTO’s Scientific Assessment of Airborne Particulate Matter, and the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry. He is a fellow of the APS, AGU, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Optical Society of America. Dr. Margaret A. LeMone is a senior scientist at NCAR. She has two primary scientific interests: (1) the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere’s planetary boundary layer and its interaction with the underlying surface and clouds overhead; and (2) the interaction of mesoscale convection with the boundary layer and surface underneath, and with the surrounding atmosphere. Dr. LeMone is also the chief scientist for Global Learning through Observations for the Benefit of the Environment (GLOBE), a worldwide hands-on, primary- and secondary-school-based science and education outreach program. GLOBE is operated by UCAR and Colorado State University under a cooperative agreement with NASA. GLOBE also receives in-kind support from the State Department; NSF funds PIs to help oversee and provide quality control for GLOBE measurements and to use GLOBE data in their research. Dr. LeMone’s salary is supported in part by NCAR and in part by the GLOBE program. Dr. LeMone is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and AMS. She is also a member of NAE and a former member of BASC. She has served on

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences the NRC’s Panel on Improving the Effectiveness of U.S. Climate Modeling, the Special Fields and Interdisciplinary Engineering Peer Committee of the NAE, and the Committee on Weather Research for Surface Transportation. Dr. LeMone received her Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington. Dr. Ramón E. López received his Ph.D. in space physics in 1986 from Rice University. He is a professor of physics and space sciences at the Florida Institute of Technology. Prior to this appointment, he was the C. Sharp Cook Distinguished Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Texas at El Paso. Dr. López is a fellow of the APS and was awarded the 2002 APS Nicholson Medal for Humanitarian Service. In 2003, he was elected vice chair of the APS Forum on Education and to serve as chair in 2005. Dr. López leads a research group that is working in both space physics and science education. His current research focuses on making detailed quantitative comparisons between the results of global three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations and observations during actual events, as well as student interpretation of visualizations. Dr. López receives research support from NASA and NSF. He is the author or co-author of 86 scientific publications and 18 nonscientific publications, including the popular science book Storms from the Sun. From 1994 to 1999, he was director of Education and Outreach Programs of APS. Dr. López is active in science education reform nationally. He has served as an education consultant for a number of school districts around the country, for state education agencies in California, Maryland, North Carolina, and Texas, and for federal agencies such as NASA and the NSF; and he was a member the NRC’s Committee on Undergraduate Science Education. Dr. Susan Solomon is widely recognized as one of the leaders in the field of atmospheric science. Since receiving her Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1981, she has been employed by NOAA as a research scientist. She made some of the first measurements in the Antarctic that showed that chlorofluorocarbons were responsible for the stratospheric ozone hole, and she pioneered the theoretical understanding of the surface chemistry that causes it. In March 2000, she received the National Medal of Science, the United States’ highest scientific honor, for “key insights in explaining the cause of the Antarctic ozone hole.” Her current research focuses on chemistry-climate coupling, and she serves as co-chair of Working Group I of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which seeks to provide scientific information to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Dr. Solomon was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1992.

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences Dr. John M. Wallace is a professor of atmospheric sciences at the University of Washington. His research has improved our understanding of global climate and its interannual and decadal variations, through the use of observational data. He has been instrumental in identifying and understanding a number of atmospheric phenomena such as the spatial patterns in month-to-month and year-to-year climate variability, including the one through which the El Niño phenomenon in the tropical Pacific influences climate over North America. Dr. Wallace receives research support from NSF and NOAA. Dr. Wallace is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has chaired several NRC panels including the Panel on Reconciling Temperature Observations, the Panel on Dynamic Extended Range Forecasting, and the Advisory Panel for the Tropical Ocean/Global Atmosphere (TOGA). He has also served on committees addressing Abrupt Climate Change: Implications for Science and Public Policy and the Science of Climate Change. Dr. Robert A. Weller received his Ph.D. in 1978 from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He is the director of the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Ocean Research at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), and has worked at WHOI since 1979. His research focuses on atmospheric forcing (wind stress and buoyancy flux), surface waves on the upper ocean, prediction of upper ocean variability, and the ocean’s role in climate. He has served as the Secretary of the Navy Chair in Oceanography. He has been on multiple mooring deployment cruises and has practical experience with ocean observation instruments. Dr. Weller receives research support from NOAA, the Naval Research Laboratory, and NSF. He is currently a co-chair of the U.S. Climate Variability and Change (CLIVAR) Scientific Steering Group and a member of the international CLIVAR Scientific Steering Group. CLIVAR receives funding from NSF’s ATM and Ocean Science Division. Dr. Weller has served on several NRC committees over the years, including the recent Committee to Review the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan and the Committee on Implementation of a Seafloor Observatory Network for Oceanographic Research; he was also a member of BASC. He is currently serving on the NRC Committee on Utilization of Environmental Satellite Data: A Vision for 2010 and Beyond. Dr. Stephen E. Zebiak is director-general, as well as director of Modeling and Prediction Research, at the International Research Institute (IRI) for climate prediction, hosted at Columbia University. IRI is supported by NOAA, the U.S. Agency for International Development, the Department of Energy, NSF, and international sources. Dr. Zebiak has worked in the area of ocean–atmosphere interaction and climate variability since completing his Ph.D. in 1984. He was an author of the first dynamical model used to

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences predict El Niño successfully. He has served as chair of the International CLIVAR Working Group on Seasonal to Interannual Prediction, co-chair of the U.S. CLIVAR Seasonal to Interannual Modeling and Prediction Panel, and member of numerous advisory committees for U.S. and international science programs. He has served as a member of AMS’s Committee on Climate Variations, and as an associate editor for the Journal of Climate. Dr. Zebiak’s expertise with intermediate-scale climate models and the interpretation of ocean and atmospheric modeling outputs on decadal and interannual scales will provide an important input to this study. Dr. Zebiak was a member of the NRC Advisory Panel for the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere program and the Committee on Improving the Effectiveness of U.S. Climate Modeling. NRC STAFF Dr. Amanda C. Staudt is a senior program officer with BASC. She received an A.B. in environmental engineering and sciences and a Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from Harvard University. Her doctorate research involved developing a global three-dimensional chemical transport model to investigate how long-range transport of continental pollutants affects the chemical composition of the remote tropical Pacific troposphere. Since joining the National Academies in 2001, Dr. Staudt has staffed the National Academies review of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan and the long-standing Climate Research Committee. Dr. Staudt has also worked on studies addressing radiative forcing of climate, surface temperature reconstructions, air quality management in the United States, research priorities for airborne particulate matter, the NARSTO Assessment of the Atmospheric Science on Particulate Matter, weather research for surface transportation, and weather forecasting for aviation traffic flow management. Dr. Claudia Mengelt is a program officer for BASC. After completing her B.S. in Aquatic Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, she received her M.S. in Biological Oceanography from the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State. Her Master’s research focused on how chemical and physical parameters in the surface ocean effect Antarctic phytoplankton species composition and consequently impact biogeochemical cycles. She obtained her Ph.D. in the Marine Sciences from the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she conducted research on the photophysiology of harmful algal species. She joined the full-time staff of BASC in the fall of 2005 following a fellowship with the NRC Polar Research Board in the winter of 2005. At the National Academies, she has worked on studies addressing the design of Arctic observing systems and evaluating lessons learned from global change assessments.

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Strategic Guidance for the National Science Foundation‘s Support of the Atmospheric Sciences Dr. Curtis Marshall is a program officer for BASC. He received B.S. (1995) and M.S. (1998) degrees in meteorology from the University of Oklahoma, and a Ph.D. (2004) in Atmospheric Science from Colorado State University. His doctoral research examined the impact of anthropogenic land-use change on the mesoscale climate of the Florida peninsula. Prior to joining the staff of BASC in 2006, he was employed as a research scientist at NOAA, where he focused on the development of coupled atmosphere–land surface models. Ms. Elizabeth A. Galinis is a research associate for BASC. After completing her B.S. in marine science from the University of South Carolina in 2001, she received her M.S. in environmental science and policy from Johns Hopkins University in 2006. Since her start at the National Academies in March 2002, Ms. Galinis has worked on studies involving next-generation weather radar (NEXRAD), weather modification, climate sensitivity, climate change, radiative forcings, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment Americas Prediction Project, U.S. future needs for polar icebreakers, and the effects of climate change on federal lands.