Appendix E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

Michael F. Goodchild (NAS) is a professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and chair of the Executive Committee of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. He received a B.A. in physics from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University. He taught at the University of Western Ontario for 19 years before moving to his present position in 1988. His research interests focus on the generic issues of geographic information, including accuracy and the modeling of uncertainty, the design of spatial decision support systems, the development of methods of spatial analysis, and data structures for global geographic information systems (GIS). He has received several awards and published numerous books and journal articles. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Geographical Sciences Committee, and was a member and a chair of the NRC’s Mapping Science Committee (1992-1999).


Andrew J. Bruzewicz is director of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Remote Sensing/GIS Center and has served as the program manager for the Corps’ civil works geospatial research and development program since its inception in 1998. Since 1991, he has conducted research on the application of geospatial technologies to disaster preparedness, planning, and response, and since 1999, he has been integrating these technologies into the USACE emergency management processes. Mr. Bruzewicz is presently the team leader for the Corps’ GIS Planning and



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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management Appendix E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Michael F. Goodchild (NAS) is a professor of geography at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and chair of the Executive Committee of the National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis. He received a B.A. in physics from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. in geography from McMaster University. He taught at the University of Western Ontario for 19 years before moving to his present position in 1988. His research interests focus on the generic issues of geographic information, including accuracy and the modeling of uncertainty, the design of spatial decision support systems, the development of methods of spatial analysis, and data structures for global geographic information systems (GIS). He has received several awards and published numerous books and journal articles. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Geographical Sciences Committee, and was a member and a chair of the NRC’s Mapping Science Committee (1992-1999). Andrew J. Bruzewicz is director of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Remote Sensing/GIS Center and has served as the program manager for the Corps’ civil works geospatial research and development program since its inception in 1998. Since 1991, he has conducted research on the application of geospatial technologies to disaster preparedness, planning, and response, and since 1999, he has been integrating these technologies into the USACE emergency management processes. Mr. Bruzewicz is presently the team leader for the Corps’ GIS Planning and

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management Response Team and serves as the Corps’ liaison to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for geospatial data collection and sharing during disasters. He is the past national education chair of the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing and has presented at two National Academies workshops. Mr. Bruzewicz holds an A.B. in economics and an A.M. in geography from the University of Chicago. Susan L. Cutter is the director of the Hazards Research Lab, a research and training center that integrates geographical information processing techniques with hazards analysis and management, as well as a Carolina Distinguished Professor of Geography at the University of South Carolina. She received her Ph.D. in geography from the University of Chicago. She is the co-founding editor of an interdisciplinary journal Environmental Hazards, published by Elsevier. She has worked in the risk and hazards fields for more than 25 years and is a nationally recognized scholar in this field. She has authored or edited eight books and more than 50 peerreviewed articles. Dr. Cutter is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), was president of the Association of American Geographers (1999-2000), and is a member of the NRC’s Geographical Sciences Committee. Paul J. Densham is a reader in geography and a researcher in the Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis at University College London (UCL). His research interests and publications focus on spatial decision support systems, locational analysis, GIS, and parallel algorithms for spatial problems. Prior to joining UCL, he was an assistant professor of geography at the State University of New York at Buffalo and a research fellow in the U.S. National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis (NCGIA). He co-led NCGIA’s research initiatives Spatial Decision Support Systems and Collaborative Spatial Decision Making, and led the investigation Parallel Computation and GIS. Dr. Densham has applied spatial decision support systems in his work on dynamic location strategies for emergency service vehicles (with Cadcorp, Ltd.) and other work with the Environmental Systems Research Institute, HSBC, NYNEX Science and Technology, Iowa Department of Education, and planning offices and government shops in India; he has also worked on migration and biodiversity problems. He holds a B.A. in geography and economics from the University of Keele, an M.Sc. in operational research from the University of Birmingham, and a Ph.D. in geography from the University of Iowa. Amy K. Donahue is associate professor of public policy at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Donahue’s research focuses on the productivity of emergency response organizations and on the nature of citizen demand

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management for public safety. For the past two years, Dr. Donahue has served as a technical adviser to the Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) Science and Technology Directorate, helping to develop research and development programs to meet the technological needs of emergency responders. From 2002 to 2003, Dr. Donahue served as senior adviser to the Administrator for Homeland Security at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). She was the agency’s liaison with DHS and the Homeland Security Council and identified opportunities for NASA to contribute to homeland security efforts across government. In 2003, Dr. Donahue spent three months in Texas helping manage the Columbia recovery operation, an intergovernmental response that involved 450 organizations and 25,000 responders. Prior to her affiliation with the University of Connecticut, Dr. Donahue was a senior research associate at the Alan K. Campbell Public Affairs Institute at Syracuse University. She also has 20 years of training and field experience in an array of emergency services-related fields, including managing a 911 communications center and working as a firefighter and emergency medical technician in Fairbanks, Alaska, and upstate New York. As a distinguished military graduate of Princeton’s Reserve Officer Training Corps, she served on active duty for four years in the 6th Infantry Division, rising to the level of captain. Dr. Donahue holds her Ph.D. in public administration and her M.P.A. from the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. Her B.A. from Princeton University is in geological and geophysical sciences. J. Peter Gomez is manager of information requirements for Xcel Energy. He has broad knowledge and experience of critical infrastructure protection, particularly in the context of gas and electric system planning and design, asset management, and data system integration. Mr. Gomez has been with Xcel Energy (formerly the Public Service Company of Colorado) since 1985. His current responsibilities include the expansion of the corporation’s asset management system across the company’s 10-state service territory. He also serves as a primary business liaison between Xcel Energy’s operations organization and IBM, the information technology business partner of Xcel Energy. Earlier, he led Xcel Energy’s Geographic Information System and Outage Management System application development organization. Mr. Gomez received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from New Mexico State University. He has served on advisory boards for the Colorado School of Mines, Metro State University, and the Denver Public Schools Career Development Center. Since 2000, Mr. Gomez has been on the Board of Directors of the Geospatial Information Technology Association (GITA) and served as its president in 2005.

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management Patricia Hu is director of the Center for Transportation Analysis at the Engineering Science and Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). She has been at ORNL since 1982 and in her current position since 2000. Ms. Hu contributed to DHS’ research and development plan for critical infrastructure protection. Additionally, she led a team (supported by the Transportation Security Administration) that studied the domain awareness of U.S. food supply chains by linking and analyzing geospatial data on transportation networks, traffic volume, choke points and congestion, freight flow, and traffic routing. Ms. Hu holds a B.C. from the National Chengchi University, Taipei, Taiwan, and an M.S. in mathematics and statistics from the University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Currently, she chairs the NRC’s Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on National Data Requirements and Programs and has been a member of more than 10 other TRB committees. Judith Klavans is director of research at the Center for Advanced Study of Language in the College of Information Studies, University of Maryland. Her research is in digital libraries, linguistics, and natural language systems. Until 2004, she was director of the Center for Research on Information Access at Columbia, which is responsible for linking theoretical computer science research with operational applications such as digital libraries and digital government. She is a principal investigator in several large projects, including the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded PERSIVAL medical digital library, the NSF and Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) supported Digital Government Research Center joint with University of Southern California-ISI, the TIDES (Translingual Information Detection, Extraction, and Summarization) multilingual summarization project funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and most recently, the Mellon-supported CLiMB (Computational Linguistics for Metadata Building) project, which links text and image collections. Prior to arriving at Columbia, Dr. Klavans spent nearly 10 years in the Computer Science Division of the T.J. Watson IBM Research Division, where her work included extracting information from machine-readable dictionaries, building bilingual aligned phrasal dictionaries, and text-to-speech. Earlier, she was postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in linguistics and computer science. Dr. Klavans holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. in linguistics from the University of London, an M.Ed. in English as a second language from Boston University, and a B.A. in Spanish and mathematics from Oberlin College. John J. Moeller is senior principal engineer at Northrop Grumman TASC (The Analytical Sciences Corporation). He is senior adviser for geospatial interoperability, geospatial architectures and infrastructures, and national

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management and international geospatial policy and strategic issues. Prior to joining TASC in 2002, Mr. Moeller accumulated 34 years of federal government management and leadership experience, including 7 years as staff director of the Federal Geographic Data Committee, 24 years in leadership roles at the Bureau of Land Management, and 3 years as an officer in the U.S. Army. Mr. Moeller has received numerous awards and letters of commendation for outstanding performance, and received the Federal Computer Week 2002 Federal 100 award presented to 100 leaders who made a difference in federal information technology during 2001. He has a B.S. in forestry from the University of New Hampshire and an M.S. in natural resource management from the State University of New York. Mark Monmonier is the distinguished professor of geography at Syracuse University. Dr. Monmonier has used geographic information systems extensively as a tool in estimation and communication of risk and uncertainty with natural and technological hazards. In addition, he researches the use of multimedia and other advanced technologies in the design and use of maps throughout society as analytical and persuasive tools in homeland security, journalism, politics, public administration, and science. Furthermore he researches the legal and ethical issues in intellectual property, liability, privacy, and public access and in mapping policy at the state and national levels. He is the author of nine books, including How to Lie with Maps. Dr. Monmonier has received numerous awards, including the Globe Book Award for Public Understanding of Geography, and awards from the Canadian Cartographic Association, the American Geographical Society, the Pennsylvania Geographical Society, and the Association of American Geographers. Dr. Monmonier was a member of the NRC’s Mapping Science Committee from 1999 to 2005. He has a B.A. from the Johns Hopkins University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University. Bruce Oswald is vice president of public sector geospatial solutions for the James W. Sewall Company. Mr. Oswald leads the company’s Public Sector GIS Consulting Group, where he directs Sewall projects and initiatives at the statewide and state-agency level. Founded in 1880, Sewall has provided comprehensive GIS consulting services to government, utility companies, and the forest industry since the 1970s. Prior to joining Sewall, Mr. Oswald was the assistant director and chief information officer of the New York State (NYS) Office of Cyber Security and Critical Infrastructure Coordination. There he was responsible for the implementation of New York’s cyber security and statewide GIS programs, as well as its critical infrastructure coordination efforts in response to the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Mr. Oswald also served as the chair of the NYS

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management GIS Coordinating Body. He has been involved in the use of GIS for emergency response for major snow and ice storms, hurricanes, landslides, and potential and real terrorist events since 1998 and in the development of New York’s new Critical Infrastructure Application, which provides access to geographic information technology for nontechnical emergency responders. Prior to serving in that position, Mr. Oswald served as the assistant director for statewide initiatives within the NYS Office for Technology as well as the director of the Center for Geographic Information. Mr. Oswald is a certified project management professional and a licensed landscape architect. He holds B.S. degrees in environmental science and landscape architecture from the College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse University, and an M.B.A. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Carl Reed is currently the chief technology officer of the Open Geospatial Consortium, Inc. (OGC), a nonprofit trade association with a current membership of 270 commercial, government, and academic organizations whose primary objective is to create a consensus forum and related industry collaboratives to solve technical and business development problems relating to geoprocessing. Prior to the OGC, Dr. Reed was the vice president of geospatial marketing at Intergraph. This was after a long tenure at the GIS software company Genasys II, where he served as chief technology officer for Genasys II worldwide. From 1989 to 1996, Dr. Reed was president of the Genasys U.S. operation. Before his tenure at Genasys, Dr. Reed worked at Autometric for six years as GIS division manager, developing a variety of systems for the civilian branches of the U.S. federal government as well as for the military. Dr. Reed has designed and implemented two major GIS packages, MOSS and GenaMap. Dr. Reed received his Ph.D. in geography, specializing in GIS technology, from the State University of New York at Buffalo in 1978. In 1996, in recognition of his contributions to the GIS industry, he was voted one of the top 10 most influential people in the industry. Ellis M. Stanley, Sr., is the general manager of the City of Los Angeles Emergency Preparedness Department. He has directed emergency management programs around the United States for 25 years and has also served as a county fire marshal, fire and rescue commissioner, and county safety officer. He has a B.S. in political science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mr. Stanley was president of the International Association of Emergency Managers, the American Society of Professional Emergency Planners, and the National Defense Transportation Association. He chaired the Certified Emergency Managers Certification Commission, is vice-chair of the Association of Contingency Planners, and

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management is vice-president for the public sector of the Business & Industry Council on Emergency Preparedness and Planning. Additionally, Mr. Stanley is on the Emergency Services Committee of the American Red Cross Los Angeles Chapter, the Emergency Preparedness Commission for the County and Cities of Los Angeles (currently as chairman of the board), the City’s Emergency Operations Board, and the board of directors of the National Institute of Urban Search and Rescue. He has many other emergency management-related advisory and training roles. As a trainer, Mr. Stanley served as the discipline expert for major sporting events (Olympics, Special Olympics, World Cup, Super Bowls, World Series, National Basketball Association Championships), national political conventions, and the Papal and World Youth Conference in Denver in 1994. He is the City of Los Angeles’ representative to the Cluster Cities Project of the Earthquake Mega-cities Initiative—a project that fosters sharing of knowledge, experience, expertise, and technology to reduce risk to large metropolises from earthquakes and other major disasters. Mr. Stanley is also an adviser to the Multidisciplinary Center for Earthquake Engineering Research. He is a member of the NRC’s Natural Disasters Roundtable. National Research Council Staff Ann G. Frazier is a program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, coordinating mapping science activities. Prior to working for the NRC, Ann had 23 years of experience in science and engineering, including 10 years with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in geographic sciences. She focused on land-cover change, urban growth, ecological modeling, and application of geographic analysis and remote sensing in interdisciplinary environmental studies. Prior to the USGS, Ann worked for 13 years in the aerospace industry on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Programs. Ann has a B.A. in physics-astronomy, an M.S. in space technology, a certificate in environmental management, and an M.S. in geography. Amanda M. Roberts is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Before coming to the National Academies, she interned at the Fund for Peace in Washington D.C., working on the Human Rights and Business Roundtable. Amanda also worked in Equatorial Guinea, Africa, with the Bioko Biodiversity Protection Program. She is a master’s student at the Johns Hopkins University in the environment and policy program and holds an M.A in international peace and conflict resolution from Arcadia University, specializing in environmental conflict in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Successful Response Starts with a Map: Improving Geospatial Support for Disaster Management Jared P. Eno is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Science and Resources. Before coming to the National Academies, he interned at Human Rights Watch’s Arms Division, working on the 2004 edition of the Landmine Monitor Report. Jared received his A.B. in physics from Brown University.