F
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

John F. Ahearne, Sigma Xi and Duke University, Co-Chair


Dr. Ahearne is the director of the Ethics Program for Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He has served as commissioner and chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, system analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense. Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee and chairs the University of California President’s Council National Security Panel that provided oversight of the nuclear weapons programs of the Los Alamos and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. In addition, Dr. Ahearne has been active in several National Research Council (NRC) committees examining issues in risk assessment. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member the American Nuclear Society and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Ahearne received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University.



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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members COMMITTEE MEMBERS John F. Ahearne, Sigma Xi and Duke University, Co-Chair Dr. Ahearne is the director of the Ethics Program for Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society, and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. He has served as commissioner and chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, system analyst for the White House Energy Office, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Energy, and Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense. Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee and chairs the University of California President’s Council National Security Panel that provided oversight of the nuclear weapons programs of the Los Alamos and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. In addition, Dr. Ahearne has been active in several National Research Council (NRC) committees examining issues in risk assessment. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member the American Nuclear Society and the National Academy of Engineering. Dr. Ahearne received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University.

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States Stuart J. Freedman, University of California at Berkeley, Co-Chair Dr. Freedman is the Luis W. Alvarez Chair of Experimental Physics at the University of California at Berkeley, with a joint appointment to the Nuclear Science Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1972. His research experience spans nuclear and atomic physics, neutrino physics, and small-scale experiments in particle physics, all focused on fundamental questions about the Standard Model. He was co-chair of the recent American Physical Society Neutrino Study and was a member of the NRC’s Committee on Elementary Particle Physics in the 21st Century (the EPP2010 committee). He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Ricardo Alarcon, Arizona State University Dr. Alarcon is a professor of physics at Arizona State University. He did his undergraduate studies at the University of Chile and received his Ph.D. in 1985 from Ohio University. He did postdoctoral work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign until 1989, when he joined Arizona State University as an assistant professor. His research covers experiments in electromagnetic nuclear physics and more recently in fundamental neutron science. He has held visiting professor appointments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1995-1997 and 1999-2001 and served as project manager for the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer project at MIT-Bates from 1999 to 2002. He was a member of the Department of Energy/National Science Foundation (DOE/NSF) Nuclear Science Advisory Committee from 2001 to 2005. In 2003 he was elected a fellow of the American Physical Society. Peter Braun-Munzinger, Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) Dr. Braun-Munzinger is division head for Kernphysik 1 (nuclear physics) at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) and professor of physics at the Technical University in Darmstadt, Germany. He earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Heidelberg in 1972. His research expertise is in the area of nuclear physics, with emphasis on ultrarelativistic collisions and detector development. Dr. Braun-Munzinger has been spokesperson for several nuclear physics experiments in the United States and elsewhere and is a leading participant in the high-energy-density experiments ALICE at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). He has also served on numerous program advisory committees, several panels of the DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee, and has held faculty positions at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Dr. Braun-

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States Munzinger is chair of the Committee for Nuclear and Hadron Physics in Germany. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and received the prize of the Polish Ministry for Science in 2003. Adam S. Burrows, University of Arizona Dr. Burrows is a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Arizona. He received his A.B. in physics from Princeton University in 1975 and his Ph.D. in physics from the Massachussetts Institute of Technology in 1979. His research is focused on supernovae and on the formation of small objects such as brown dwarfs and extrasolar planets. Dr. Burrows was a member of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the NRC’s 2000 astronomy and astrophysics decadal survey and recently served as the chair of NASA’s roadmapping effort for the search for Earth-like planets. Richard F. Casten, Yale University Dr. Casten is D. Allan Bromley Professor of Physics and director of the Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale University. He received his Ph.D. from Yale in 1967 and held positions domestically and in Europe before returning to Yale in 1995. He received the Humboldt Prize (Senior U.S. Award) in 1983, was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Bucharest, and is a fellow of the Americal Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Institute of Physics (United Kingdom). He was chair of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) from 2003 to 2005, a member of NSAC from 1997 to 2001, and of the NSAC Long Range Plan Working Groups in 1989, 1999, and 2001. He is vice-chair of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the APS (chair-elect in 2007, chair in 2008) and associate editor of Physical Review C. He was a founder and chair (1989-2003) of the IsoSpin Laboratory Steering Committee, co-chair of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) Users Organization Executive Committee (2002-2003) and currently chair. Among many other committees on which Dr. Castan has served, he was chair of the International Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics Community (NUSTAR) Advisory Panel for GSI-FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) (2003-2004) and a member of panels to review U.K. physics and astronomy research (1999, 2005). Dr. Casten has made major contributions to the study of collective behavior in nuclei, to algebraic models (IBA, dynamical symmetries), and to the study of correlations of nuclear observables, quantal phase transitions, critical point symmetries, and the valence p-n interaction.

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States Yanglai Cho, Argonne National Laboratory (retired) Dr. Cho is retired from the Argonne National Laboratory and now chairs the technical advisory committee for a project based in Darmstadt, Germany: the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research. His expertise is in accelerator science and technology; he has played a leading role in the design and construction of proton, electron, and neutron accelerators in the United States, Europe, and Asia. Dr. Cho has chaired numerous international conferences on accelerator science and technology, including the International Linac Conference in 1998. He also had a leading role in facilitating the joint proposal between two agencies in the Japanese government that gave rise to the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex. Gerald T. Garvey, Los Alamos National Laboratory Dr. Garvey is an experimental nuclear physicist and a senior fellow at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is expert in neutrino physics and nucleon-nucleon interactions, as well as being experienced in issues of science policy. Dr. Garvey served for 2 years as assistant director for physical sciences in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. He has also served on the Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Program Advisory Committee and is familiar with the scientific and technical aspects of large experimental nuclear physics facilities. He was director of the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility from 1985 to 1990 and is a former director of the Argonne National Laboratory’s Physics Division. He earned his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1962. Wick C. Haxton, University of Washington Dr. Haxton received his Ph.D. in physics from Stanford University in 1976, after which he worked for 7 years as a research associate, Oppenheimer Fellow, and staff member in the Theory Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 1984 he joined the University of Washington, where he directed the Department of Energy’s Institute for Nuclear Theory (INT) from 1991 to 2006. He is currently professor of physics and a senior fellow of the INT. His research interests include atomic and nuclear tests of symmetry principles and conservation laws, nuclear and neutrino astrophysics, and many-body techniques. Dr. Haxton chaired the American Physical Society’s Division of Nuclear Physics in 1992 and the APS Division of Astrophysics in 1996, and is a former APS general councillor. He was awarded the Hans Bethe Prize of the APS in 2004. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States a past Guggenheim Fellow (2000). Currently he is an editor of Physics Letters and serves on the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council. Robert L. Jaffe, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Dr. Jaffe is the Jane and Otto Morningstar Professor of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has been chair of the faculty and director of the Center for Theoretical Physics. His research specialty is the theoretical physics of elementary particles, especially the dynamics of quark confinement, the Standard Model, and the quantum structure of the vacuum. He has also worked on the quantum theory of tubes and the astrophysics of dense matter and on many problems in scattering theory. Dr. Jaffe received his A.B. from Princeton University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University. He has served on the program advisory committees of several national laboratories, including the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. At present he chairs the Science and Technology Steering Committee of Brookhaven Science Associates. For a decade he chaired the Advisory Council of the Physics Department of Princeton University. Since 1996, Dr. Jaffe has been an adviser to and visiting scientist at the RIKEN-Brookhaven Research Center. He spent the fall term of 1997 on leave from MIT at the RIKEN-Brookhaven Center, and was a resident at the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Study and Conference Center in the fall of 2004. Dr. Jaffe is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has been highly recognized for his teaching of undergraduates at MIT. Noemie B. Koller, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick Dr. Koller is professor of physics at Rutgers University. She earned her Ph.D. in 1958 from Columbia University and went to Rutgers in 1960. She is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. At Rutgers, she served as associate dean of the faculty of arts and sciences (1992-1996) and was director of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory (1986-1989). She chaired the APS Division of Nuclear Physics in 1993, served on many APS and NSF committees, served on the NRC’s 1980 nuclear physics decadal survey, and chaired the APS Committee for the International Freedom of Scientists (2002-2004). Dr. Koller’s research is mostly in experimental nuclear structure physics, but she has made contributions to the fields of ion-solid interactions, surface magnetism, and condensed-matter physics studied via nuclear and Mössbauer techniques. Her research group carries out experiments and develops techniques designed to measure magnetic dipole moments of very short-lived nuclear states. Recently, she has extended these techniques for experiments with radioactive

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States beams. She has received many honors, most recently the APS Division of Nuclear Physics Distinguished Service Award. A scholarship for the best female undergraduate physics major at Rutgers was endowed in her honor. Stephen B. Libby, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dr. Libby is the Theory and Modeling Group Leader in V Division in the Physics and Advanced Technologies Directorate at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). His current research focuses on high-energy-density physics and its application to stockpile stewardship, inertial confinement fusion, and short-wavelength lasers. This work includes proposals for experiments at the National Ignition Facility currently under construction at LLNL. Dr. Libby received his B.A. from Harvard University in 1972 and his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton University in 1977. He performed postdoctoral work at the Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and was subsequently a research assistant professor at Brown University. During this period, he worked on quantum chromodynamics and the theory of the quantum Hall effect. In 1986, he joined A Division at LLNL. Focusing on x-ray laser research, he eventually became the design group and program leader. He was also a consulting professor at Stanford University from 1992 to 1994. Dr. Libby is a fellow of the American Physical Society. In addition, he holds a certificate in international security from Stanford University. Shoji Nagamiya, Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex Dr. Nagamiya is director of the J-PARC Center—the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex—an initiative of the Japanese federal government for building a $1.3 billion national accelerator laboratory centered on a massive, high-intensity proton accelerator. Dr. Nagamiya received his B.S. in 1967 from the University of Tokyo and his Ph.D. in 1972 from Osaka University. His research expertise is in relativistic heavy-ion physics, with experience at the Bevalac, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and CERN; he was most recently spokesperson for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. He served as chair of Japan’s Committee on Nuclear Physics and chair of C12—the Commission on Nuclear Physics for the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP). Dr. Nagamiya has been a member of many international program advisory committees for laboratories in particle and nuclear physics and has also been on the editorial board of a number of major nuclear physics journals. He was professor at the University of Tokyo and also at Columbia University before assuming his present position. Dr. Nagamiya is a member of the Science Council of Japan and chair of the Physics Section of this council.

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States Witold Nazarewicz, University of Tennessee, Knoxville Dr. Nazarewicz is a professor of physics in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, with an adjunct appointment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He is also scientific director of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at ORNL. He received his Ph.D. from the Warsaw Institute of Technology in 1981. His research has centered on the theoretical nuclear many-body problem. Dr. Nazarewicz is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Physics, U.K. He is listed by ISI as among the most highly cited in physics. Dr. Nazarewicz has authored or co-authored more than 280 research papers in refereed journals and has conducted more than 160 invited talks at major international conferences. He has served on numerous national and international advisory and review committees, including the NRC’s Committee on Nuclear Physics, and on various editorial boards Michael V. Romalis, Princeton University Dr. Romalis is an atomic physics faculty member in the Department of Physics at Princeton University. He received his Ph.D. in physics from Princeton in 1997 and went to the University of Washington as a postdoctoral researcher, later becoming faculty there. In Washington, he became interested in a possible aberration in known physical laws, a hypothetical idea called CPT violation. His research group is most interested in using atomic physics to probe fundamental symmetries. At the present time, Dr. Romalis is conducting experiments to test symmetries of physical laws: specifically, the symmetries of time-reversal, CP, Lorentz, and CPT. While these symmetries are on firm ground within a conventional field theory, they can be violated in more general theories, including quantum gravity. Dr. Romalis is also exploring practical applications of precision atomic physics techniques, including the development of a very sensitive atomic magnetometer that can surpass low-temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detectors in magnetic-field sensitivity. In collaboration with Princeton University’s Center for Brain, Mind and Behavior, his group is developing applications for the imaging of magnetic fields produced by the brain. Paul Schmor, TRIUMF Dr. Schmor is head of the Accelerator Systems Division at the TRIUMF laboratory, which includes the 500 MeV driver cyclotron facility as well as the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility. TRIUMF is Canada’s accelerator-based laboratory for particle and nuclear physics, located on the campus of the University of British Columbia. ISAC can provide beams of rare, short-lived radioactive

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States isotopes for use in various experiments, including nuclear and condensed-matter physics as well as medicine and industrial applications. Dr. Schmor was appointed project leader for the ISAC construction project in 1996. He was a member of the 1999 DOE/NSF NSAC Isotope Separator On-Line Task Force and at present is a member of the European ISOL (EURISOL) International Advisory Panel. He was a member of the Accelerator Systems Advisory Committee during the construction phase of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) as well as a member of the Target Subcommittee for the DOE’s review of the SNS. Dr. Schmor is a senior member of the Canadian Section of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Michael C.F. Wiescher, University of Notre Dame Dr. Wiescher is the Freimann Professor of Nuclear Physics at the University of Notre Dame. He received his Ph.D. in nuclear physics at the Universität Münster, Institut für Kernphysik, in 1980. Dr. Wiescher is the director of the Nuclear Science Laboratory at Notre Dame and the director for the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics (JINA) at the University of Notre Dame, Michigan State University, and the University of Chicago, funded through the NSF Physics Frontier Center program. The central research interest of Dr. Wiescher is the experimental and theoretical study of nuclear reactions important to the understanding of energy production and the origin of the elements in stars and in explosive stellar environments. Currently, his research focuses on understanding nucleosynthesis in explosive hydrogen- and helium-burning processes that occur in novae, supernovae, and accreting neutron stars. In addition, he studies nucleosynthesis during the late stages of stellar development, in particular in AGB stars. Dr. Wiescher has made several presentations on the science case for RIA and has been involved with several exploratory RIA working groups. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society’s Division of Astrophysics and Division of Nuclear Physics, was awarded the Hans A. Bethe Prize in 2003 by the American Physical Society, and is a member of the American Astronomical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft. Stanford E. Woosley, University of California at Santa Cruz Dr. Woosley is a professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the University of California at Santa Cruz. His research is in nuclear astrophysics, especially the origin of the elements, and in theoretical high-energy astrophysics, especially models for supernovae and gamma-ray bursts and other violent events. He was awarded the 2005 Hans A. Bethe Prize in nuclear astrophysics by the American Physical Society and the 2005 Rossi Prize in high-energy astrophysics of the American

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Scientific Opportunities with a Rare-Isotope Facility in the United States Astronomical Society. Dr. Woosley is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. NRC STAFF Donald C. Shapero, Board on Physics and Astronomy Dr. Shapero is the director of the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. He received a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1964 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1970. His thesis addressed the asymptotic behavior of relativistic quantum field theories. After receiving the Ph.D., Dr. Shapero became a Thomas J. Watson Postdoctoral Fellow at IBM. He subsequently became an assistant professor at American University, later moving to Catholic University and then joining the staff of the NRC in 1975. He took a leave of absence from the NRC in 1978 to serve as the first executive director of the Energy Research Advisory Board at the Department of Energy. Dr. Shapero returned to the NRC in 1979 to serve as special assistant to the president of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1982, he started the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA). As BPA director, he has played a key role in many NRC studies, including the two most recent surveys of physics and the two most recent surveys of astronomy and astrophysics. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Astronomical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the International Astronomical Union. He has published research articles in refereed journals in high-energy physics, condensed-matter physics, and environmental science. Timothy I. Meyer, Board on Physics and Astronomy Dr. Meyer is a senior program officer at the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. He received a Notable Achievement Award from the NRC’s Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences in 2003 and a Distinguished Service Award from the National Academies in 2004. Dr. Meyer joined the NRC staff in 2002 after earning his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from Stanford University. His doctoral thesis concerned the time evolution of the B meson in the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. His work also focused on radiation monitoring and protection of silicon-based particle detectors. During his time at Stanford, Dr. Meyer received both the Paul Kirkpatrick and the Centennial Teaching awards for his work as an instructor of undergraduates. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Materials Research Society, and Phi Beta Kappa.