B
Committee Biographies

John F. Ahearne (NAE) is the director of the Ethics Program at Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society; a lecturer in public policy at Duke University; and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. Dr. Ahearne received his bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Cornell University and a doctorate in physics from Princeton University. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1959 to 1970, resigning as major. He has also served as deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense (1972-1977), in the White House Energy Office (1977), as deputy assistant secretary of energy (1977-1978), and as commissioner and chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (chair, 1979-1981). Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Sigma Xi, and the American Nuclear Society. He has chaired the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Effects of Nuclear Earth-Penetrator Weapons and Other Weapons and served as a member of the NRC Committee on Best Practices for Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting. From 2001 to 2003, he served as cochair of the NRC Committee on End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States.



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U.S.–Russian Collaboration in Combating Radiological Terrorism B Committee Biographies John F. Ahearne (NAE) is the director of the Ethics Program at Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society; a lecturer in public policy at Duke University; and an adjunct scholar at Resources for the Future. His professional interests are reactor safety, energy issues, resource allocation, and public policy management. Dr. Ahearne received his bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Cornell University and a doctorate in physics from Princeton University. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1959 to 1970, resigning as major. He has also served as deputy and principal deputy assistant secretary of defense (1972-1977), in the White House Energy Office (1977), as deputy assistant secretary of energy (1977-1978), and as commissioner and chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (chair, 1979-1981). Dr. Ahearne currently serves on the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Society for Risk Analysis, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, Sigma Xi, and the American Nuclear Society. He has chaired the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on the Effects of Nuclear Earth-Penetrator Weapons and Other Weapons and served as a member of the NRC Committee on Best Practices for Nuclear Materials Protection, Control, and Accounting. From 2001 to 2003, he served as cochair of the NRC Committee on End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States.

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U.S.–Russian Collaboration in Combating Radiological Terrorism Laurin Dodd is managing director of the Chernobyl Shelter Implementation Program (SIP) Project Management Unit, Bechtel International Systems, Inc. He held the position of deputy program director of Threat Reduction Programs in the Moscow office of Bechtel International Systems, Inc., from 2005 to 2006. He held the position of associate laboratory director of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) from 1999 to 2005. He managed the National Security Division of INEEL, developing missions, strategies, and business plans for the division’s four directorates: Infrastructure and Defense Systems; Intelligence, Sensor, and Information Systems; Safeguards and Security Programs; and Counterintelligence. Prior to this, Mr. Dodd held various positions at Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1980 to 1999. As manager of the International Nuclear Safety Program, he developed and managed a program to reduce the risks at nuclear facilities in nine countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU), including work to establish risk reduction priorities, ensure that all work performed at FSU sites would meet licensing requirements of the host country regulators, develop and maintain capabilities for in-country logistics, and conduct bilateral program reviews regularly with Russian and Ukrainian counterparts, among other duties. Mr. Dodd’s work on the International Nuclear Safety Program encompassed the Soviet Designed Reactor Safety Program, Chernobyl Initiatives, and Core Conversion Program. As manager of the Nuclear Systems and Concepts Department at PNNL, Mr. Dodd made personal efforts to initiate lab-to-lab exchanges with the Russian Academy of Sciences Institute of Nuclear Safety, Kurchatov Institute Russian Research Center, and other Russian institutes, resulting in work agreements on nuclear safety, plutonium disposition, and arctic environmental issues. Mr. Dodd held the position of engineer at UNC Nuclear Industries from 1976 to 1980. He received a bachelor of science degree in engineering physics from Oregon State University in 1973 and master of science degree in nuclear engineering from the University of Washington in 1976. Siegfried S. Hecker (NAE) is director emeritus, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and a visiting professor at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. He received his bachelor of science, master of science, and doctorate degrees in metallurgy from Case Western Reserve University. His research interests include materials science and engineering, nuclear technologies, arms control and non-proliferation, and science policy. He joined Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 1973 as a technical staff member, and he served as director from 1986 to 1997. In 1997, he returned to materials research with a focus on plutonium science and international nuclear cooperative threat reduc-

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U.S.–Russian Collaboration in Combating Radiological Terrorism tion efforts. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1988 for outstanding research on plutonium and metal deformation and forming, and for leadership in developing energy and weapons systems. In 2003, he was elected a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Hecker serves as chair of the NRC Committee on Counterterrorism Challenges for Russia and the United States, and he is a member of the National Research Council Governing Board and the Council of the NAE. In addition to his membership in several other prominent societies, Dr. Hecker is a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on International Security and Arms Control Nonproliferation Panel and participates in the Stanford University Five-Nations Project on Security in South Asia. Darleane C. Hoffman is professor of the graduate school in the Department of Chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and faculty senior scientist in the Nuclear Science Division of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Her research interests include rapid chemical separation of short-lived fission products; separations chemistry of lanthanide, actinide, and transactinide elements; search for heavy elements in nature; studies of radionuclide migration in geologic media; studies of the spontaneous fission process; heavy-ion reactions and production of new neutron-rich heavy-element isotopes; and atom-at-a-time studies of the chemical and nuclear properties of the heaviest elements. Professor Hoffman received her B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa. She served as a chemist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1952-1953) and then joined Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1953. She spent sabbatical years as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Senior Postdoctoral Fellow at the Institute for Atomic Energy, Kjeller, Norway in 1964-1965 and as a Guggenheim fellow at LBNL in 1978-1979. She returned to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to be division leader of the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division from 1979 to 1982 and the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division from 1982 to 1984. In 1984 Dr. Hoffman joined the Department of Chemistry at UCB as full professor of nuclear chemistry and leader of the Heavy Element Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group at LBNL. She helped found the Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LNLL) in 1991, and served as its first director (1991-1996) and as senior adviser and charter director from 1996 to 2006. Professor Hoffman is a fellow of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Institute of Chemists, the American Physical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was inducted into the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame (2000). She has held visiting lectureships in

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U.S.–Russian Collaboration in Combating Radiological Terrorism the United States and abroad and was awarded honorary doctorates from Clark University, (2000) and Bern University, Switzerland (2001). She received American Chemical Society Awards for Nuclear Chemistry in 1983, the Garvan-Olin Medal in 1990, and the Priestley Medal in 2000. She was awarded the U.S. National Medal of Science in 1997, the Sigma Xi Proctor Prize for Scientific Achievement in 2003, and the Radiochemistry Society Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004. She has served on several boards and committees for the National Research Council including the Board on Radioactive Waste Management and the Committee on End Points for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste in Russia and the United States. Roger E. Kasperson (NAS) is a research professor at the George Perkins Marsh Institute at Clark University. He has also served as executive director of the Stockholm Environment Institute. He received his doctorate from the University of Chicago and has taught at the University of Connecticut and Michigan State University. His expertise is in risk analysis, global environmental change, and environmental policy. Dr. Kasperson is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the International Society for Risk Analysis. He has served on the National Research Council Board on Radioactive Waste Management (1998-2001) and the Committee on Disposition of High-Level Radioactive Waste Through Geological Isolation: Development, Current Status, and Technical Policy Challenges (1999-2001). He also has been honored by the Association of American Geographers for his hazards research. He chaired the International Geographical Union Commission on Critical Situations/Regions in Global Environmental Change. He currently serves on the Executive Committee of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board, is a trustee of the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies in Japan, serves on the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Change and the Science Advisory Committee of the Tyndall Center for Climate Change Research, and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He has authored or coedited 18 books and monographs and more than 120 articles or chapters in scholarly journals or books.