Appendix D
Committee Member Biographies

Dr. Alvin W. Trivelpiece (NAE) (Chair) was formerly director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL; January 1989-March 2000). Since May 2000 Dr. Trivelpiece has been a consultant to Sandia National Laboratories. In January 1996 he was appointed president of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the managing and operating contractor for ORNL. Dr. Trivelpiece served as executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from April 1987 to January 1989. He went to AAAS from the U.S. Department of Energy, where he served as director of the Office of Energy Research from 1981 to 1987. Dr. Trivelpiece was head of the 1986 U.S. Delegation on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy to the USSR. While on leave from the University of Maryland (1973-1975), where he was a professor of physics, he served with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission as assistant director for research in the Division of Controlled Thermonuclear Research. A native Californian, he received his B.S. degree from California Polytechnic State University in 1953 and his M.S. (in 1955) and Ph.D. degrees (in 1958) from the California Institute of Technology. He was a member of the Board of Directors of Bausch & Lomb from 1989 to 2001 and of Charles River Laboratories from 1992 to 1999. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. He served on the National Academies Review of Technical Issues Related to Ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (July 1, 2000-October 31, 2001). He also served on the National Academies Committee on Science and Technology Policy Aspects of Selected Social and Economic Issues in Russia (November 1, 1999-November 10, 2000) and other National Academies committees. His research has focused on plasma physics, controlled thermonuclear research, and particle accelerators. He was granted several patents on accelerators and micro-



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Science and Technology in Kazakhstan: Current Status and Future Prospects Appendix D Committee Member Biographies Dr. Alvin W. Trivelpiece (NAE) (Chair) was formerly director of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL; January 1989-March 2000). Since May 2000 Dr. Trivelpiece has been a consultant to Sandia National Laboratories. In January 1996 he was appointed president of Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation, the managing and operating contractor for ORNL. Dr. Trivelpiece served as executive officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) from April 1987 to January 1989. He went to AAAS from the U.S. Department of Energy, where he served as director of the Office of Energy Research from 1981 to 1987. Dr. Trivelpiece was head of the 1986 U.S. Delegation on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy to the USSR. While on leave from the University of Maryland (1973-1975), where he was a professor of physics, he served with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission as assistant director for research in the Division of Controlled Thermonuclear Research. A native Californian, he received his B.S. degree from California Polytechnic State University in 1953 and his M.S. (in 1955) and Ph.D. degrees (in 1958) from the California Institute of Technology. He was a member of the Board of Directors of Bausch & Lomb from 1989 to 2001 and of Charles River Laboratories from 1992 to 1999. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. He served on the National Academies Review of Technical Issues Related to Ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (July 1, 2000-October 31, 2001). He also served on the National Academies Committee on Science and Technology Policy Aspects of Selected Social and Economic Issues in Russia (November 1, 1999-November 10, 2000) and other National Academies committees. His research has focused on plasma physics, controlled thermonuclear research, and particle accelerators. He was granted several patents on accelerators and micro-

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Science and Technology in Kazakhstan: Current Status and Future Prospects wave devices and is the author or coauthor of two books and many papers. He also serves as an adviser to various government agencies. In addition to involvement in several other scientific organizations, he is a fellow of the American Physical Society, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and the AAAS and is a member of the American Nuclear Society. Dr. Clifford Gaddy holds a Ph.D. in economics from Duke University. He has previously been a visiting professor of economics at Johns Hopkins University and an adjunct professor in the Department of Economics and the Center for Eurasian, Russian, and East European Studies at Georgetown University. In 1996-1997 he served as an adviser on issues of fiscal federalism for the U.S. government’s Tax Reform Oversight Project for Russia. Dr. Gaddy is coauthor (with Barry W. Ickes, Pennsylvania State University) of a forthcoming Brookings Institution book, Russia’s Virtual Economy, which analyzes the nature and evolution of the postcommunist economic system in Russia. An earlier book, The Price of the Past: Russia’s Struggle with the Legacy of a Militarized Economy (Brookings Institution, 1996), was awarded the 1997 prize of the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies as the year’s best book on the political economy of the former Soviet Union and eastern Europe. Dr. Norman P. Neureiter is director of the Center for Science, Technology, and Security Policy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He retired in September 2003 from the post of science and technology adviser to the Secretary of State upon the completion of his three-year term of service. Previously, he was vice president of Texas Instruments Asia. While there he held a number of positions, including director of East-West Business Development, manager of International Business Development, manager of the TI Europe Division, and director TI-Japan. During a five-year residency in Tokyo, he was an active participant in negotiation and implementation of the U.S.-Japan Semiconductor Trade Agreement. Prior to his work with private industry, Dr. Neureiter worked as an international affairs assistant in the White House Office of Science and Technology during 1969-1973, reporting to the president’s science adviser. Dr. Neureiter entered the U.S. Foreign Service in 1965, serving as deputy science attache with the U.S. embassy in Bonn, Germany. From 1967 to 1969, he was the first U.S. science attache in eastern Europe, based at the U.S. embassy in Warsaw, with responsibility for Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Poland. Dr. Marilyn L. Pifer is senior program manager and senior technical advisor at the U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation. Since 2001 she has served as senior manager of the Basic Research and Higher Education Program. Prior to joining the foundation, Dr. Pifer served twice in the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, with responsibility for science cooperation in Russia and in South Asia and

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Science and Technology in Kazakhstan: Current Status and Future Prospects the Middle East. She has also done research as a fellow with the University of Manchester’s Programme on Policy Research in Engineering, Science and Technology and through a National Academy of Sciences exchange at the Institute of Molecular Biology, Moscow. Dr. Pifer holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in biology from Stanford University and a Ph.D. in molecular biology and genetics from the Johns Hopkins University Medical School. She speaks Russian, Ukrainian, and German.