Appendix
Workshop Agenda and Participants

Contributions from the Behavioral and Social Sciences in Reducing and Preventing Teen Motor Crashes


Workshop May 15-16, 2006


Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Transportation Research Board


The National Academies Washington, DC


Meeting Goals: Provide an update and engage in discussion on the following questions:

  1. How do theories and evidence from the behavioral, cognitive, social, health, and biological sciences inform understanding of the risk factors that increase teen motor vehicle crashes and the protective factors that reduce such crashes?

  2. How can theories and evidence from the behavioral, cognitive, social, health, and biological sciences inform improved prevention, program, and policy interventions to reduce risky teen motor vehicle driving behaviors, as well as promote responsible teen driving?

  3. What research and interventions are most likely to advance teen motor vehicle safety over the short and long term?



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Appendix Workshop Agenda and Participants Contributions from the Behavioral and Social Sciences in Reducing and Preventing Teen Motor Crashes Workshop May 15-16, 2006 Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Transportation Research Board The National Academies Washington, DC Meeting Goals: Provide an update and engage in discussion on the following questions: (1) How do theories and evidence from the behavioral, cognitive, social, health, and biological sciences inform understanding of the risk fac- tors that increase teen motor vehicle crashes and the protective factors that reduce such crashes? (2) How can theories and evidence from the behavioral, cognitive, social, health, and biological sciences inform improved prevention, pro- gram, and policy interventions to reduce risky teen motor vehicle driving behaviors, as well as promote responsible teen driving? (3) What research and interventions are most likely to advance teen motor vehicle safety over the short and long term? 51

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52 PREVENTING TEEN MOTOR CRASHES Monday, May 15, 2006 Welcome, Introductions, and Overview of the Workshop • What is the task of the committee? • Workshop format • What do we hope to learn from this workshop? Robert Graham, M.D., University of Cincinnati College of Medicine/ Workshop Moderator, Committee Chair Panel 1: Teens Behind the Wheel • Description of the problem (crashes, injuries, magnitude, forecast). • Complexity of driving and crash avoidance, particularly for novice drivers. • How is driving different for teens (e.g., age, inexperience, crash factors)? • What do we know about contributing factors to teen driver crashes (e.g., age, gender, experience, time of day, passengers, alcohol, seat belts)? • What is the set of cognitive and motor skills that must be learned in order to be a safe driver? David Preusser, Ph.D., Preusser Research Group A. James McKnight, Ph.D., Transportation Research Associates Respondent: Flaura Winston, M.D., Ph.D., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/ Committee Member Discussion and Q & A Panel 2: Adolescent Development (A) Physical Characteristics of Adolescents • How does the adolescent brain and its development affect teen driving? • How do adolescent sleep patterns and sleep needs affect teen driving?

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53 APPENDIX Abigail Baird, Ph.D., Dartmouth College, School of Psychological and Brain Sciences Mary Carskadon, Ph.D., Brown University Discussion and Q & A (B) Adolescent Relationships • What are the characteristics of adolescent peer relationships and the influence of these relationships on adolescent decision making and risk-taking? • What are the characteristics of adolescent relationships with parents and the influence of these relationships on adolescent decision mak- ing and risky behavior? • How do adolescents perceive adult authority and what is the influ- ence of these relationships on adolescent decision making and risky behavior? • How do these adolescent social relationships influence risky behavior? Sara Kinsman, M.D., M.S.C.E., Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Joseph Allen, Ph.D., University of Virginia Bruce Simons-Morton, Ed.D., NICHD/NIH Discussion and Q & A (C) Adolescent Behavior: Risky Behavior and Decision Making • What do we know about social and behavioral research on adoles- cent risky behavior, sensation-seeking, and reckless behavior? • What research guides our understanding of self-regulated and executive functioning during adolescence? • What factors and settings influence how adolescents make decisions? • How do patterns of adolescent risky behavior and decision making influence teen driving and teen driving interventions? Ronald Dahl, M.D., Staunton Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh Julie Downs, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Social and Decision Sciences

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54 PREVENTING TEEN MOTOR CRASHES Respondent: Donald Fisher, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts/Committee Member Adolescent Development: Cross-Cutting Discussion William DeJong, Ph.D., Boston University/Committee Member Panel 3: Current Approaches to the Teen Driving Problem • Education: What approaches to improve teen driving outcomes have been tried in the U.S. and internationally (e.g., guidance for parents, driver education)? • Laws and enforcement: What approaches to improve teen driving outcomes have been tried in the U.S. and internationally (e.g., seat belt regulations, alcohol policies, license suspension/revocation policies)? • Public health/social policy: What approaches to improve teen driv- ing outcomes have been tried in the U.S. and internationally (gradu- ated licensing, mandated hours of driving practice, health care pro- vider interventions, health education)? • What has worked, what has not, and what has not been evaluated? • What has been the impact of these policies? Anne McCartt, Ph.D., Insurance Institute for Highway Safety Robert Foss, Ph.D., University of North Carolina Richard Compton, Ph.D., Director, NHTSA Lawrence D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., F.S.A.M., Children’s Hospital, Washington, DC Respondents: Ruth Shults, Ph.D., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Allan F. Williams, Ph.D., Bethesda, M.D./Committee Member Discussion and Q & A

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55 APPENDIX Panel 4: Emerging Driving Technology • What technologies exist to enhance training and feedback? • What is the field experience of driver technology and its influence on teens and driving? Max Donath, Ph.D., Intelligent Transportation Systems Institute, University of Minnesota R. Wade Allen, MS, Systems Technology, Inc. John Lee, Ph.D., University of Iowa/Committee Member Discussion and Q & A Adjourn Tuesday, May 16, 2006 Welcome and Overview of Day 2 Robert Graham, M.D., Moderator, Committee Chair Panel 5: Teen Driving Current Challenges • To what extent are current policies and interventions informed by issues of adolescent development? How might they be revised to take into account teen driving and adolescent development? • What role can parents, teachers, and other adults play in building driving competencies and reducing risky behaviors among teens? • What role can the media and public messaging about driving play in building driving competencies and reducing risky behaviors among teens? • What areas of teen driving risk have we missed in the presentations and discussion? • What research is needed to move the field forward? Richard Catalano, Ph.D., University of Washington, Social Development Research Group Sue Ferguson, Ph.D., Insurance Institute for Highway Safety

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56 PREVENTING TEEN MOTOR CRASHES Respondent: Jean Shope, Ph.D., University of Michigan/Committee Member Discussion and Q & A Discussant Reports and Group Discussion James Hedlund, Ph.D., President, Highway Safety North Daniel Keating, Ph.D., University of Michigan/Committee Member Wrap-up Robert Graham, M.D. Adjourn

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57 APPENDIX WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS Joseph P. Allen, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, University of Virginia R. Wade Allen, M.S., Systems Technology, Inc., Hawthorne, CA Jon Antin, VA Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg Randy Atkins, National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC Abigail Baird, Ph.D., Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Dartmouth College Brian K. Barber, Ph.D., Department of Child and Family Studies, University of Tennessee Thomas Bevan, dNovus RDI, Atlanta, GA Stephanie Binder, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC C. Raymond Bingham, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, Ann Arbor, MI Scott Brawley, National Sleep Foundation, Washington, DC Claire D. Brindis, Dr.P.H., National Adolescent Health Information Center, University of California, San Francisco John Brock, Anteon, Washington, DC Alan Brown, Joshua Brown Foundation, Kennesaw, GA B. Bradford Brown, Ph.D., Department of Educational Psychology, University of Wisconsin Melissa Burns, Veritas, Washington, DC Alex Cardinali, Nissan North America, Inc., Herndon, VA Mary Carskadon, Ph.D., Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Brown Medical School Richard F. Catalano, Ph.D., Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington Rosemary Chalk, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC Lori Cohen, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, Arlington, VA Bill Combs, Teen Driver Safety, Bethesda, MD Richard Compton, Ph.D., Traffic Injury Control, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Brian Cox, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Daniel Cox, UVA Health Systems Center, Charlottesville, VA

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58 PREVENTING TEEN MOTOR CRASHES Ronald E. Dahl, M.D., Child and Adolescent Sleep/Neurobehavioral Laboratory, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic and the University of Pittsburgh Vicki Dang, Student, George Washington University, Washington, DC Lawrence J. D’Angelo, M.D., M.P.H., Center for Community Pediatric Health, Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC Maggie Davis, UVA Health Systems Center, Charlottesville, VA William DeJong, Ph.D., School of Public Health, Boston University Thomas Dingus, Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA T. Bella Dinh-Zarr, American Automobile Association National Office, Washington, DC Max Donath, Ph.D., Intelligent Transportation Systems Institute, University of Minnesota Nancy Donovan, Government Accountability Office, Washington, DC Julie S. Downs, Ph.D., Department of Social and Decision Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University Darrel Drobnich, National Sleep Foundation, Washington, DC Susan Duchak, Allstate Foundation, Northbrook, IL Patricia Ellison-Potter, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Kathleen Ethier, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Sue Ferguson, Ph.D., Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Arlington, VA Mighty Fine, American Public Health Association, Washington, DC Donald L. Fisher, Ph.D., Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst Scott Fisher, National Association of County and City Health Officials, Washington, DC Robert D. Foss, Ph.D., Center for the Study of Young Drivers, Highway Safety Research Center, University of North Carolina Mark Freedman, Westat, Rockville, MD John Frooshani, Nissan North America, Inc., Herndon, VA John Gardenier, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Vienna, VA Turkan Gardenier, Pragmatica Corporation, Vienna, VA Jay Giedd, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD Anne Ginn, General Motors, Warren, MI Charity Goodman, Government Accountability Office, Washington, DC

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59 APPENDIX Jennifer Appleton Gootman, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC Robert Graham, M.D., Department of Family Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati Allen Greenberg, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, DC Jeff Greenberg, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI Lauren Hafner, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Bonnie L. Halpern-Felsher, Ph.D., Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of California, San Francisco Christian Hanna, Children’s Safety Center, Marshfield, WI James Hedlund, Ph.D., Highway Safety North, Ithaca, NY Russell Henk, Texas Transportation Institute, San Antonio, TX Marci Hertz, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA William Horrey, Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton, MA James Jenness, Westat, Rockville, MD Christene Jennings, Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety, Inc., Arlington, VA Ewa Kalicka, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Daniel P. Keating, Ph.D., Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan Shimrit Keddem, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Wendy Keenan, Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council and Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC Tara Kelley-Baker, PIRE, Calverton, MD Sara Kinsman, M.D., M.S.C.E., Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Peter Kissinger, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, Washington, DC Sheila Klauer, VA Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA Terry Kline, Eastern Kentucky University, Richmond, KY John D. Lee, Ph.D., Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Iowa Suzie Lee, VA Tech Transportation Institute, Blacksburg, VA Neil Lerner, Westat, Rockville, MD Nadine Levick, Academic, New York, NY Lawrence Lonero, Northport Associates, Cobourg, Ontario, Canada John Lundell, Injury Prevention Research Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City

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60 PREVENTING TEEN MOTOR CRASHES Neal Martin, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC Daniel R. Mayhew, M.A., Traffic Injury Research Foundation, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Anne T. McCartt, Ph.D., Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, Arlington, VA Daniel V. McGehee, University of Iowa, Iowa City Mary Pat McKay, George Washington University, Washington, DC A. James McKnight, Ph.D., Transportation Research Associates, Annapolis, MD Justin McNaull, American Automobile Association, Washington, DC Jacqueline Milani, Center for Injury Research and Policy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD Peter Moe, Maryland Highway Safety Office, Hanover, MD Frederik Mottola, National Institute for Driver Behavior, Cheshire, CT Cheryl Neverman, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Erik Olsen, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD Marie Claude Ouimet, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD Richard Pain, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC Mike Perel, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, DC Kathleen Perkins, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV Val Pezoldt, Texas Transportation Institute, San Antonio, TX Alexander Pollatsek, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA David Preusser, Ph.D., Preusser Research Group, Inc., Trumbull, CT Deborah Quackenbush, Raydon Corporation, Daytona Beach, FL Alex Quistberg, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Katherine Redding, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC Barbara Rogers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington, DC Carol W. Runyan, Ph.D., Injury Prevention Research Center, University of North Carolina Meredith St. Louis, South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC Teresa Senserrick, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

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61 APPENDIX Karen Sherwood, Partnership for Prevention, Washington, DC Jean Thatcher Shope, Ph.D., Transportation Research Institute, University of Michigan Ruth Shults, Ph.D., M.P.H., Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA Amy Sievers, Iowa Department of Transportation, Des Moines, IA Bruce Simons-Morton, Ed.D., M.P.H., Prevention Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD Renee Slick, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Susan Solomon, Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Loren Staplin, TransAnalytics, LLC, Kulpsville, PA Kevin Techau, Iowa Dept of Public Safety, Des Moines, IA Anne Titler, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, Harrisburg, PA Deborah Trombley, National Safety Council, Itasca, IL Matthew Trowbridge, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI Steve Tudor, Iowa Department of Transportation, Des Moines, IA Robert Voas, PIRE, Calverton, MD Penny Wells, Students Against Drunk Driving, Inc., Marlborough, MA Joel Whitaker, Beverage Daily News, Burtonsville, MD John White, American Automobile Association, Heathrow, FL Brad Wible, Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD Pat Wilder, Joshua Brown Foundation, Kennesaw, GA Allan F. Williams, Ph.D., Consultant, Bethesda, MD Flaura Koplin Winston, M.D., Ph.D., Center for Injury Research and Prevetion, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Dianne Wolman, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC

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