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B Presenter Biographical Sketches Steven N. Blair, P.E.D., is a Professor at the Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina and an Executive Lecturer in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas. Dr. Blair also serves an Adjunct Professor at the School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and the College of Education at the University of Houston; and a Benjamin Meaker Fellow at the University of Bristol, England. Dr. Blair’s research focuses on the associations between lifestyle and health, with a specific emphasis on exercise, physical fitness, body composition, and chronic disease. Dr. Blair is the recipient of three honorary doctoral degrees—Doctor Honoris Causa degree from the Free University in Brussels, Belgium; Doctor of Health Science degree from Lander Uni- versity; and Doctor of Science Honoris Causa from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom. Dr. Blair is a Fellow of the American College of Epidemiology, Society for Behavioral Medicine, American College of Sports Medicine, American Heart Association, and the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education. He is also a member of the American Epidemiological Society. He was the first president of the National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity and is a past-president of the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education. Dr. Blair was granted a MERIT Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and is one of the few individuals outside the U.S. Public Health Service to be awarded the Surgeon General's Medallion. He has pub- lished widely in the scientific literature and served as the Senior Scien- tific Editor for the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health. 165

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166 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP Peter H. Brubaker, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science and Executive Director of the Healthy Exercise and Lifestyle Programs (formerly Cardiac Rehabilitation) at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine and the American Association of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation. Dr. Brubaker has published widely in the scientific literature on the topics of exercise physiology and cardiol- ogy and he is coauthor of the textbook, Coronary Artery Disease: Essen- tials of Prevention and Rehabilitation Programs. He served as the Clinical Section Editor of the ACSM Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription (7th edition). His research and clinical work focus on heart failure exercise physiology and cardiovascular disease prevention and rehabilitation. His current NIH-supported research focuses on the effect of exercise interventions on aging, obesity, and heart failure. Kerry S. Courneya, Ph.D., is a Professor and Canada Research Chair in Physical Activity and Cancer in the Faculty of Physical Education at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. He received his B.A. degree and M.A. degree in physical education from the University of Western Ontario in London, Canada, and his Ph.D. in kinesiology from the Uni- versity of Illinois at Urbana. Dr. Courneya served as an Assistant and Associate Professor at the University of Calgary for five years before moving to the University of Alberta in 1997. Professor Courneya’s re- search program focuses on the role of physical activity in cancer control, including primary prevention, coping with treatments, rehabilitation after treatments, and secondary prevention and survival. His research interests include both the determinants and outcomes of physical activity for can- cer control and behavior change interventions. His research has been funded by the National Cancer Institute of Canada, the Canadian Breast Cancer Research Alliance, the NIH, the Lance Armstrong Foundation, the Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, and the Alberta Cancer Board. Rodney K. Dishman, Ph.D., is a Professor of Kinesiology and an Ad- junct Professor of Psychology at the University of Georgia. In this capac- ity, he advises graduate students studying exercise neuroscience and interventions to increase physical activity. Dr. Dishman received his Ph.D. at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His research has focused on the behavioral determinants of physical activity and the neurobiologi-

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167 APPENDIX B cal aspects of mental health outcomes associated with physical activity. His research has been supported by the NIH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Heart Association (AHA), and the United States Olympic Committee. Dr. Dishman is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Psychological Association, and the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education. He has served as a consultant on exercise to the NIH, CDC, the Sports Medicine Council for the USOC, and the Olympic Prize sub- committee of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). He was one of 22 founding members of the IOC’s Olympic Academy of Sport Sciences. Joseph E. Donnelly, Ed.D., FACSM, is a Professor and Director of the Energy Balance Laboratory and the University of Kansas Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management in Lawrence, Kansas. Dr. Donnelly is the founder and Director of the annual University of Kansas Conference on Prevention and Treatment of Obesity that is attended by 500 health-care providers. His research support derives from NIH, foun- dation, and industry for a variety of physical activity and nutrition pro- jects that involve both children and adults. He is widely published in the scientific literature and has authored two college textbooks. He was a coauthor for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Position Paper on Appropriate Strategies for Weight Reduction and Maintenance in Adults. Dr. Donnelly chairs the NIH Psychosocial Risk and Disease Prevention Study Section. He received his Ed.D. from West Virginia University in Morgantown and is a Fellow of ACSM. Roger A. Fielding, Ph.D., is Director and Scientist I at the Nutrition, Exercise Physiology, and Sarcopenia Laboratory at the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging and a Professor of Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutri- tion Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. He also serves as Codirector of the Tufts-New England Medical Center Clinical Research Center. Dr. Fielding’s research interests include the examination of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the age-associated decline in skeletal muscle mass, the resulting impact on function, and the potential role of exercise and other therapeutic interventions on attenuating this process. His research is currently supported by USDA, the National Insti- tute on Aging (NIA), private foundations, and industry. Dr. Fielding served as Chair of the Lifestyle Interventions for Elders (LIFE) Study

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168 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP Intervention and Operations Committee that oversaw the development of the physical activity interventions for the LIFE Pilot Study. He is Coin- vestigator and Chair of the Body Composition Analysis Committee for the NIA-funded “Calerie” (Comprehensive Assessment of Long-term Effects of Reducing Intake of Energy) Trial, and a member of the Physi- cal Dysfunction Committee for the NIA-funded Testosterone Trial Plan- ning Grant. Dr. Fielding is a member of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Physiological Society, and the National Scien- tific Advisory Council of the American Federation for Aging Research. Patty S. Freedson, Ph.D., is a Professor and Chair in the Kinesiology Department at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She instructs undergraduate and graduate students in anatomy and physiology, exer- cise physiology, physiology of training and conditioning, pediatric exer- cise physiology, and physical activity and women’s health. Dr. Freedson’s research interests include the assessment of physical activity; physical activity, fitness, and health in different populations; pediatric exercise physiology; and fitness test development. She has published widely in the scientific literature including several book chapters related to various aspects of exercise physiology. She has been a principal inves- tigator (PI) on grants received from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, NIH, foundations, and corporate sponsors. She is a past- president of the Research Consortium of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (AAHPERD), and the New England chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine. In 1996, she was the recipient of the Presidential Citation Award from the AAHPERD. In 2001, Dr. Freedson was one of the President’s Lecturers at the National American College of Sports Medicine Conference in Bal- timore. In 2003, Dr. Freedson delivered the Cureton Fitness Lecture at the American College of Sports Medicine Conference in San Francisco. In 2004, she was the recipient of the Chancellor’s Medal and delivered the Distinguished Faculty Lecture at the University of Massachusetts. She is currently Vice President of the American College of Sports Medi- cine, and a Fellow of the Research Consortium, the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, and the American College of Sports Medicine. Glenn Gaesser, Ph.D., is a Professor of Exercise Physiology and Direc- tor of the Kinesiology Program at the University of Virginia in Char- lottesville. Professor Gaesser was graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the

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169 APPENDIX B University of California, Berkeley, where he also received an M.A. and a Ph.D. with a specialization in exercise physiology. His research interests include metabolic and cardiovascular responses to acute and chronic ex- ercise and the impact of diet and exercise on risk markers associated with the metabolic syndrome. He cochaired the writing group that produced the 1998 American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) position on “The recommended quantity and quality of exercise for developing and maintaining cardiorespiratory and muscular fitness, and flexibility in healthy adults.” He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medi- cine, and in the 1990s, he served on ACSM’s board of trustees, as chair of its Pronouncements Committee, and as an associate editor of Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. Dr. Gaesser is also an editorial advi- sory board member of, and contributing writer to, Health at Every Size. William E. Garrett, Jr., M.D., Ph.D., is Professor of Surgery in Ortho- pedics at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. Dr. Garrett has a longstanding interest in orthopaedic sports medicine clinical practice and research. He has been especially interested in condi- tions affecting exercise and performance of the knee, including anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), meniscus, cartilage, and patellar injuries. His clinical activities focus on arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery on the knee and shoulder. He is currently conducting basic and clinical stud- ies on ACL injuries in athletes, particularly to understand the difference between ACL injuries in men and women. He is also working on new instrumentation for ACL reconstructive surgery to create a more anat- omic reconstruction with more normal biomechanics. His goal for the Michael W. Krzyzewski Human Performance Laboratory, otherwise known as the K-Lab, is to conduct research in injury prevention and per- formance enhancement for elite and recreational athletes. Dr. Garrett is past-president of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medi- cine, and he has served as Director of the American Board of Orthopae- dic Surgery. He is also a member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the American College of Sports Medicine, and an active member of IOC committees. For the past 16 years, Dr. Garrett has served as the Medical Director of the U.S. Soccer Federa- tion, and Chair of the Physical Fitness, Sports Medicine, and Research Committee. He has also served as Team Physician for the U.S. Men’s and Women’s National Teams in World Cup competition. Dr. Garrett has published widely in the scientific literature, and has edited 13 books and 50 book chapters. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the

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170 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP Kappa Delta Award from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Sur- geons, the Citation Award from the American College of Sports Medi- cine, and the George D. Rovere Award for Education in the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. He has received teaching awards at both Duke University and the University of North Carolina. Andrew Goldberg, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine; Chief of the Divi- sion of Gerontology; and Director of the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center (GRECC) at the Baltimore VA Medical Center and the University of Maryland, Baltimore, NIA-NIH Research Training Grant Center in Exercise Physiology and Aging, and the Claude D. Pep- per Older Americans Independence Center. He is also Codirector of the University of Maryland Center for Research on Aging. Dr. Goldberg re- ceived his medical degree from the State University of New York. He completed his residency at New York University-Bellevue Medical Cen- ter and received his fellowship training in the Division of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Nutrition at the University of Washington in Seattle. He was Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine and Medicine at Wash- ington University in St. Louis from 1977–1983, Associate Professor and Director of Research in the Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medi- cine at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine from 1983–1990, and then became Professor of Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore in 1990, where he established the Division of Gerontology and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. Goldberg leads research programs that investigate the functional declines and medical diseases associated with aging that are influenced by physical decondi- tioning and factors associated with obesity (lifestyles, genetic, and ethnic factors). Dr. Goldberg’s research focuses on the mechanisms by which exercise and weight loss affect and can improve obesity and related metabolic complications. He is currently studying gene-environmental factors that affect fat cell metabolism, particularly lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity, the rate limiting enzyme for lipid uptake and storage by the fat cell, and the influence of gene polymorphisms (LPL, PPARγ) on metabolic and body fat responses to weight loss and exercise training. Laurie J. Goodyear, Ph.D., is a Senior Investigator and Head of the Section on Metabolism at the Joslin Diabetes Center, and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. She received her Ph.D. in cell biology from the University of Vermont. Her postdoctoral training included fellowships at the University of Vermont, Harvard

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171 APPENDIX B Medical School, and in the Section on Metabolism at the Joslin Diabetes Center. Dr. Goodyear is an active member of the American Diabetes As- sociation (ADA), American Physiological Society, and the American College of Sports Medicine. She has served as a member of the NIH Study Sections on Respiratory and Applied Physiology Study and Skele- tal Muscle Biology Study. Dr. Goodyear’s awards and honors include the Mary K. Iacocca Fellowship from the Joslin Diabetes Center, a New In- vestigator Award from the American College of Sports Medicine, and Career Development Awards from the ADA and Juvenile Diabetes Re- search Foundation. William L. Haskell Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center. A physiologist by training, his ar- eas of research interests include homodynamic/metabolic effects of exer- cise; multifactor, intervention, and coronary atherosclerosis; weight loss, nutrition, and exercise effects on lipoprotein and ambulatory blood pres- sure; and coronary artery disease. Recent work has included exploration of balance, strength, flexibility, and psychosocial effects of different types of exercise training. Dr. Haskell received his B.S. in biological sci- ences from the University of California at Santa Barbara, his M.S. in ex- ercise science, his Ph.D. in human physiology from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, and a certification in cardiovascular disease epidemiology from the University of New York at Buffalo. His profes- sional awards include an honorary doctorate of medicine from Linköping University in Sweden; and lifetime achievement awards from the Ameri- can Association for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation, the American College of Sports Medicine, and the Council on Aging and Adult Development of the American Association for Physical Activity and Recreation. Bradley Hatfield, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiol- ogy at the University of Maryland, College Park with adjunct appoint- ments in the Center for Neural and Cognitive Sciences as well as the Center on Aging. He received his Ph.D. in 1982 from the Pennsylvania State University where he was supported by the Research Council of Canada as a doctoral fellow. His research focuses on exercise and the aging brain and the psychological aspects of expert motor performance. This work is characterized by a cognitive neuroscience approach and typically involves neuroimaging of the brain using electroencephalogra- phy, event-related potentials, and magnetoencephalography as the pri-

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172 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP mary technical tools. He has published widely in the scientific literature. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Sport and Exer- cise Psychology. Dr. Hatfield’s research efforts have been supported by the U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences, the American Heart Association, the Erickson Foundation, and the Johns Hopkins University Center for Health and Information Technology. He is currently supported by the Department of Defense’s Army Research Of- fice, the Army Research Laboratory (Human Research and Engineering Directorate) in Aberdeen, Maryland, and the NIH. Current NIH- supported research is focused on the role of physical activity and geno- type in delay of onset of dementia. Dr. Hatfield recently served as Presi- dent of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity and the mid-Atlantic chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Educa- tion, and a charter Fellow of the American Association for the Advance- ment of Applied Sport Psychology. Gregory W. Heath, D.H.Sc., M.P.H., is the Guerry Professor and Head of the Department of Health and Human Performance at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and Director of Research at the University of Tennessee College of Medicine, Chattanooga. Dr. Heath was formally the Lead Health Scientist with the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). His training is in physiology, nutrition, and epidemiology. Dr. Heath re- ceived his M.P.H. and doctor of health science degrees from Loma Linda University in California. He completed his postdoctoral training in ap- plied physiology at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. A former Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, he worked at CDC for over 20 years. Dr. Heath has spent most of his professional ca- reer devoted to understanding and promoting physical activity and exer- cise for the enhancement of health and the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. He has published widely in the scientific literature. Dr. Heath is a Fellow in the American College of Sports Medicine and in the American Heart Association’s Councils on Epidemiology and Prevention and Nutrition, and Physical Activity and Metabolism. Jennifer Hootman, Ph.D., A.T.C., FACSM, is currently an Epidemi- ologist with the Arthritis Program at CDC. Her research focuses on the epidemiology of musculoskeletal conditions, particularly activity-related

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173 APPENDIX B injuries and arthritis and other rheumatic conditions, and the relation to physical activity and exercise, function, and disability. Dr. Hootman is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Athletic Training and an incoming Coeditor of the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. She received her B.S. degree in sports medicine from Marietta College and an M.S. degree in health, physical education, recreation, and dance with a specialization in athletic training from Illinois State University. She received her doc- toral degree in epidemiology and biostatistics from the University of South Carolina, focusing on injury and physical activity epidemiology. Dr. Hootman is a National Athletic Trainers Association certified athletic trainer and has worked as a Division I collegiate athletic trainer and un- dergraduate instructor in sports medicine for 10 years. She is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Bruce H. Jones, M.D., M.P.H., is a Colonel (Retired, U.S. Army) and is currently with the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preven- tive Medicine Injury Prevention Program at the Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. He has served on the staff of the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, Massachusetts, where he established its injury epidemiology program and was Chief of the Occu- pational Medicine Division. He has also served as Director of Epidemi- ology and Disease Surveillance at the U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine and managed its Injury Prevention Program. He has held various positions within the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His research and practice has focused on documenting the effects of injuries on soldiers and military readiness and examining the value of integrated injury and disease surveillance and control programs for the prevention of injuries. Dr. Jones retired from the U.S. Army as a Colonel in July 1998 but continues to consult with the Army and other military services. He is a Fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine. He received his M.D. from the Kansas University Medical Center in Kansas City and his M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is board certified in preventive medicine. Wendy M. Kohrt, Ph.D., is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. She is the Director of the Investigations in Metabolism, Ag- ing, Gender, and Exercise (IMAGE) Research Group in the Division of

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174 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP Geriatric Medicine, and the Director of the Energy Balance Core Labora- tory for the NIH-supported Clinical Nutrition Research Unit. Dr. Kohrt’s research interests are in the general area of age-related changes in me- tabolism, sex steroids, and body composition with an emphasis on under- standing changes that occur in women after the menopause. Dr. Kohrt’s research is focused on understanding why menopause increases propen- sity for fat gain, particularly in the abdominal region. Her intervention studies involve exercise, weight loss, and/or hormone therapy and focus on the health consequences of abdominal fat accumulation in women and the mechanisms responsible for this menopause-related phenomenon. Another focus of Dr. Kohrt’s research is on bone health in aging and the extent to which lifestyle behaviors (e.g., diet and exercise) can protect against bone loss. Current studies are directed at identifying novel fac- tors, such as the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, which may compromise the benefits of exercise on bone health. Caroline Macera, Ph.D., is a Professor of Epidemiology at the School of Public Health at San Diego State University (SDSU). Dr. Macera has over 25 years experience as an epidemiologist and has published exten- sively in the area of physical activity and health. Prior to joining the fac- ulty at SDSU, she led the surveillance and epidemiology team at the Physical Activity and Health Branch at CDC. She also served as Coleader for the Healthy People 2010 chapter on physical activity and fitness and led the development of the physical activity items that are now used in the CDC’s statewide Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Richard F. Macko, M.D., is Professor in the Department of Neurology and Medicine, Division of Gerontology; Associate Director of Research for the Geriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Core; and Director of the VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Center of Excellence in Exercise and Robotics in Baltimore. Dr. Frank also serves as Aca- demic Director at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine Reha- bilitation Medicine Division, and is a standing member of the (NIH/NICHD) Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research Grants Panel and VA Rehabilitation Research Grant Panels. His research focuses on developing models of task-oriented exercise to improve motor function, cardiovascular fitness, and metabolic health for individuals aging with the chronic disability of stroke. The interdisciplinary approach to this research model includes investigating mechanisms of exercise-mediated

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175 APPENDIX B neuromuscular adaptations at the central nervous system and peripheral muscular/metabolic levels. Central nervous system investigations charac- terize brain plasticity in locomotor control of older hemiparetic stroke patients participating in health-promoting treadmill exercise rehabilita- tion programs that are now shown in randomized studies to improve am- bulatory function even decades after stroke. The muscle and metabolic research examines effects of exercise on body composition and molecu- lar mechanisms underlying inflammatory and metabolic abnormalities in hemiparetic muscle, which regulates insulin and glucose metabolism and may be modifiable to reduce recurrent stroke risk. Robert M. Malina, Ph.D., FACSM, is a Research Professor at Tarleton State University in Stephenville, Texas. He is a former Professor at Michigan State University where he retired in 2002. Dr. Malina’s re- search interests focus on the biological growth and maturation of chil- dren and adolescents with an emphasis on motor development and performance, youth sports and young athletes, and the potential influ- ences of physical activity and training for sports. A related area of inter- est is the growth, performance, and physical activity of Latin American youth with a primary emphasis on Mexico. Professor Malina has served as Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Human Biology (1990– 2002), Editor of the Yearbook of Physical Anthropology (1980–1986), and Section Editor for growth and development for the Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews (1981–1999) and the Research Quarterly for Ex- ercise and Sport (1981–1993). Dr. Malina also serves on the editorial boards of 13 journals in the sport sciences and biological anthropology. Dr. Malina earned his doctoral degrees in physical education at the Uni- versity of Wisconsin, Madison, and in anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. He has received several honorary degrees (doctor honoris causa) from the Catholic University of Leuven in Bel- gium; the Academy of Physical Education at Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland; and the University School of Physical Education in Wrocław, Poland. Heather McKay, Ph.D., is Professor in the Faculty of Medicine, De- partment of Orthopaedics and Family Practice, and Interim Director for the Centre for Hip Health at the University of British Columbia in Van- couver, Canada. She is coauthor of two books, Physical Activity and Bone Health and Strong Bones and Muscles, published by Human Kinet- ics Publishers. During her eight years at the University of British Colum-

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176 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP bia, she has published widely in scientific journals about the role of exer- cise and other lifestyle factors for child and older adult health. Dr. McKay was a Principle Investigator on the development and evaluation of the recently initiated Action Schools! BC—a multidisciplinary, mul- tisectoral physical activity and healthy eating program in elementary schools. This model is a broad-based provincial initiative, supported by three government ministries, which promotes a shift in elementary school culture toward increased physical activity. Action Schools! BC targets cardiovascular health, bone health, obesity, psychosocial health, and aca- demic performance outcomes. Dr. McKay is a Michael Smith Founda- tion for Health Research Senior Scholar and a Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies Career Scholar. Linda D. Meyers, Ph.D., is the Director of the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dr. Meyers has also served as the Deputy Director and a Senior Program Officer in Food and Nutrition Board. Prior to joining the Institute of Medicine in 2001, she worked for 15 years in the Office of Disease Pre- vention and Health Promotion in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services where she was a Senior Nutrition Advisor, Deputy Di- rector, and Acting Director. Dr. Meyers has received a number of awards for her contributions to public health, including the Secretary’s Distin- guished Service Award for Healthy People 2010 and the Surgeon Gen- eral’s Medallion. Dr. Meyers has a B.A. in health and physical education from Goshen College in Indiana, an M.S. in food and nutrition from Colorado State University, and a Ph.D. in nutritional sciences from Cor- nell University. James R. Morrow, Jr., Ph.D., is a Regents Professor in the Department of Kinesiology, Health Promotion, and Recreation at the University of North Texas. He completed his Ph.D. in Research and Evaluation Meth- odology from the University of Colorado. His teaching and research fo- cus on measurement issues related to physical fitness and activity assessment and the relationship between these variables and quality of life. He has authored five books and has published widely in the scien- tific literature. Dr. Morrow has been a coinvestigator on federally funded research projects estimated at approximately $10 million. He has been elected as a Fellow to the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Academy of Kinesiology and Physical Education, AAHPERD Research Consortium, and the North American Society of Health, Physi-

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177 APPENDIX B cal Education, Recreation, Sport and Dance Professionals. Dr. Morrow has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (1989–1993), and he currently serves as Coeditor for the Journal of Physical Activity and Health. He serves as a member of the Cooper Insti- tute’s FITNESSGRAM Advisory Board and the President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports’ Science Board. Miriam E. Nelson, Ph.D., is Director of the John Hancock Center for Physical Activity and Nutrition and Associate Professor of Nutrition at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University in Boston. She holds a Ph.D. in nutrition from Tufts University. For the past 12 years, Dr. Nelson has been the PI of studies on exercise and nutrition for midlife and older adults. Her research is supported by grants from the NIH and private foundations. Dr. Nelson has written several books, including Strong Women, Strong Bones, which received the esteemed Books for a Better Life Award for best wellness book of 2000 from the Multiple Sclerosis Society. In 1994, Dr. Nelson was named a Brookdale National Fellow, a national award given annually to five or six young scholars deemed to be future leaders in the field of aging. She was awarded a Bunting Fellowship at the Mary Ingraham Bunting Institute at Radcliffe College for 1997–1998. In 1998, Dr. Nelson received the Life Time Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Governor’s Committee on Physical Fitness and Sports. She is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Anne Newman, M.D., M.P.H., is a Professor of Epidemiology and Medicine in the Graduate School of Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Newman has conducted numerous population studies of disease and disability in older adults. As a geriatrician and epidemiolo- gist, she developed protocols to assess functional outcomes (including disability, gait disorders, cognitive impairment) and important geriatric syndromes (e.g., sleep disorders, weight loss) in Pittsburgh’s Cardiovas- cular Health Study (CHS), a 19-year NIH/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-funded longitudinal study of the risk factors and natural history of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Dr. Newman is the field center PI of CHS ancillary studies including the Sleep Heart Health Study and the Coronary Artery Calcium Study. Dr Newman is the PI of the CHS All Stars, a National Institute of Aging (NIA)-funded study designed to assess exceptional aging and function in the CHS co- hort. She is also the PI of the NIA-funded study of Health, Aging, and

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178 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP Body Composition (Health ABC) at the Pittsburgh Field Center, a longi- tudinal study of weight change, sarcopenia, and function in an older co- hort, now in its 10th year. She is also the PI of the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study, a pilot study designed to as- sess the feasibility of a full-scale walking intervention trial in healthy and frail older adults. Additionally, Dr. Newman has just been awarded a grant for one of four study centers in the NIA Multicenter Studies in Ex- ceptional Survival in Families, designed to study long-lived families in the United States and Europe. Dr. Newman is Codirector of the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of Pittsburgh, and is also Codirector of the NIA-funded Training Grant in the Epidemiology of Aging. She is the Pilot Studies Core Leader for the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center. She has mentored numerous M.D., M.P.H., and Ph.D. students in the epidemiology of aging. Patrick J. O’Connor, Ph.D., is Professor and Codirector of the Exercise Psychology Laboratory in the Department of Exercise Science at the University of Georgia in Athens. His previous academic appointments include Assistant Professor, University of Georgia, Health and Human Performance, Exercise Science; and Assistant Professor, Arizona State University. He received his B.S. degree in political science from the University of Oregon, his M.S. in exercise science from Purdue Univer- sity, and his Ph.D. in exercise psychology from the University of Wis- consin. Dr. O’Connor’s research has investigated psychobiological and mental health outcomes of acute and chronic physical activity. Dr. O’Connor’s research spans several areas, including exploring the influ- ence of exercise on moods such as anger, anxiety, energy, and depres- sion; understanding exercise-related muscle pain by using the R-III nociceptive reflex as a tool to elucidate delayed-onset muscle pain; ex- amining the relationship between physical activity and the human cir- cadian system, including sleep; and understanding the relationship between physical activity and the physical and mental health of very young female gymnasts. He is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Russell R. Pate, Ph.D., is the Associate Dean for Research and a Profes- sor in the Department of Exercise Science at the Norman J. Arnold School of Public Health at the University of South Carolina in Columbia. He received a B.S. degree in physical education from Springfield Col- lege, and his M.S. degree and Ph.D. in exercise physiology from the

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179 APPENDIX B University of Oregon. Dr. Pate's research interest and expertise focuses on physical activity measurement, determinants, and physical activity promotion in children and youth. He also directs a national postgraduate course that develops research competencies related to physical activity and public health. Dr. Pate is also involved in the CDC funded Preven- tion Research Center at the University of South Carolina. His research includes studies on preschoolers' physical activity levels and how schools can influence these levels, as well as multicenter trials on physical activ- ity promotion among middle school and high school-aged girls. Dr. Pate serves as an investigator for the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Ac- tive for Life Program that encourages physical activity among seniors. He serves on the Kraft Food Global Health and Wellness Advisory Council, and is a past-president of both the American College of Sports Medicine and the National Coalition on Promoting Physical Activity. James Pivarnik, Ph.D., is a Professor of Kinesiology and Epidemiology in the College of Education, Director of the Center for Physical Activity and Health, and Director of the Human Energy Research Laboratory at Michigan State University in East Lansing. His previous academic ap- pointments were in the Department of Health and Human Performance at the University of Houston; Department of Pediatrics and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Baylor College of Medicine; and Ad- junct Associate Professor in the School of Public Health at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston. Dr. Pivarnik earned his B.S. degree from Indiana University, M.S. degree from James Madison Uni- versity, and was awarded his Ph.D. from Indiana University. He com- pleted postgraduate training at St. Louis University School of Medicine. As an exercise physiologist and epidemiologist, Dr. Pivarnik studies the exercise responses of females, particularly during pregnancy, and chil- dren, both healthy and those with chronic diseases. His focus is on the role of physical activity in reducing the risk factors for chronic disease development (e.g., cardiovascular disease) and the morbidity and mortal- ity of those affected by these conditions. Judith G. Regensteiner, Ph.D., is a Professor of Medicine in the De- partment of Cardiology Heart Center, and Director of the Center for Women’s Health Research at University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver. Dr. Regensteiner serves on the editorial boards of Vas- cular Medicine and Diabetes Care. She is the PI of studies in type 2 dia- betes and peripheral arterial disease. Her current research focuses on exercise and type 2 diabetes—gender and endothelial function (funded

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180 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY WORKSHOP by the American Diabetes Association) and an NIH-supported evaluation of the mechanisms that explain why exercise rehabilitation is efficacious in treating patients with claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (the AMNESTI study). Dr. Regensteiner is an investigator for two NIH multicenter studies: the Look Ahead trial that is designed to determine whether reducing obesity improves cardiovascular outcomes in type 2 diabetes, and the CLEVER study, which compares the efficacy of angio- plasty versus supervised exercise rehabilitation for treating claudication. Dr. Regensteiner has published widely in the scientific literature. James H. Rimmer, Ph.D., is a Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development and Adjunct Professor in Movement Sciences at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He also serves as an Adjunct Pro- fessor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Northwestern University, which is affiliated with the Rehabilitation Insti- tute of Chicago. For the past 25 years, Dr. Rimmer has developed and directed health promotion programs for people with disabilities. He has published widely in peer-reviewed journals and authored several book chapters on various topics related to physical activity, health promotion, secondary conditions, and disability. He directs two federally funded centers: the National Center on Physical Activity and Disability and the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Recreational Technolo- gies and Exercise Physiology Benefiting People with Disabilities. Dr. Rimmer has published standardized measurement instruments that can be used to evaluate the accessibility of fitness and recreation facilities for people with disabilities, and was recently funded by NIH to develop a health empowerment zone for people with disabilities in and around the University of Illinois at Chicago medical campus. Dr. Rimmer is cur- rently completing a CDC-funded randomized trial; the Physician- Referred Community-Based Approach to Increasing Awareness and Sus- tainability of Physical Activity for Overweight Adults with Mobility Limitations. He is a Healthy People 2010 Panel Member and was in- volved in the development of the Chapter 6 Workplan, Disability, and Secondary Conditions. Dr. Rimmer serves on several national commit- tees, including the Scientific and Medical Advisory Board for Life Fit- ness Academy, and the Executive Committee of the American Public Health Association’s Disability Special Primary Interest Group. RADM Penelope Slade Royall, P.T., M.S.W., is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, and Director, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office of Public

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181 APPENDIX B Health and Science, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). She is a Commissioned Corps Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service. RADM Royall leads prevention priorities for DHHS and is a senior advisor to the Assistant Secretary for Health and to the DHHS Secretary. Prior to this appointment, she was Acting Executive Director, President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports and Senior Public Health Advisor, Immediate Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. Before joining the Office of Public Health and Science, she was the Chief of Physical Rehabilitation in the Physical Rehabilitation Depart- ment, Federal Medical Center, Butner, North Carolina. RADM Royall earned a degree in physical therapy and her M.S.W. degree in social work from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. David S. Siscovick, M.D., M.P.H., is Professor of Medicine and Epide- miology, Codirector of the Cardiovascular Health Research Unit, and Director of the NHLBI-funded Cardiovascular Epidemiology Training Program at the University of Washington. Dr. Siscovick completed his undergraduate training at the University of Pennsylvania and attended medical school at the University of Maryland before completing a resi- dency in internal medicine and earning an M.P.H. degree in epidemiol- ogy at the University of Washington. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, a Teaching and Research Scholar of the American Col- lege of Physicians, a NHLBI Preventive Cardiology Academic Awardee, and a Donald R. Reynolds Scholar. He is currently a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the NIA. He is a clinical- cardiovascular epidemiologist, whose research has focused on the devel- opment and application of knowledge related to the prevention of cardio- vascular diseases. In addition to his research on the role of exercise and nutrition in sudden cardiac arrest, he has conducted population-based research in genetic, biochemical, pharmacological, and environmental epidemiology related to atherosclerotic metabolic risk and cardiovascular health. He has also contributed to multiple NHLBI-funded prospective, multicenter cohort studies of risk factors, subclinical, and clinical cardio- vascular disease, including the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), the Multi-ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adult Study (CARDIA), and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). Dr. Siscovick has published widely in the scien- tific literature, and he is currently the PI of three R01s funded by the NHLBI.

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