THE RISE OF INTELLIGENT SOFTWARE SYSTEMS AND MACHINES



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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium THE RISE OF INTELLIGENT SOFTWARE SYSTEMS AND MACHINES

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium Introduction M. BRIAN BLAKE Georgetown University Washington, D.C. DAVID B. FOGEL Natural Selection, Inc. La Jolla, California The human brain is the most powerful computer not developed by man. The complexity, performance, and power dissipation of the human brain are all unmatched in traditional computer and software systems. For decades, scientists have attempted to model the complexity and efficiency of the human brain, or the evolutionary process that created it, in other words, to create intelligent systems that can adapt their behavior to meet goals in a variety of environments. In this session, we examine the creation, use, and integration of intelligent systems in our lives and offer insights into the future capabilities of machine intelligence.

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