APPENDIXES



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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium APPENDIXES

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium Contributors Robert L. Axtell is an associate professor at the Center for Social Complexity and Computational Social Science at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. Previously, Dr. Axtell was a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., and he also served as a visiting or adjunct professor at the Santa Fe Institute, New School University, Johns Hopkins University, and Georgetown University. He earned a Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University, where he studied economics, computer science, game theory, operations research, and environmental science. His book, Growing Artificial Societies: Social Science from the Bottom Up (MIT Press, 1996), co-authored with J. Epstein, was an early exploration of the potential of multi-agent systems modeling in the social sciences. Dr. Axtell’s research has been published in academic journals (e.g., Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Economic Journal, Computational and Mathematical Organization Theory, Journal of Regulatory Economics) and reprised in the popular science press (e.g., Scientific American, Science News, New Scientist, Discover, Technology Review), newspapers (e.g., Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Washington Post), and magazines (e.g., Atlantic Monthly, New Yorker). His latest book, Artificial Economies of Adaptive Agents: The Multi-Agent Systems Approach to Economics, was published by MIT Press in 2006. Dr. Axtell has been a consultant to industry and government, through the former BiosGroup, with NuTech Solutions, and most recently with BAE Systems. Matthew J. Barth is director of the College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology at the University of California (UC), Riverside. His Transportation Systems and Vehicle Technology Research Laboratory

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium has several full-time staff members and provides research experience for undergraduate and graduate students; the research is focused on intelligent transportation systems and air quality. From 1985 to 1986, Dr. Barth was a member of the technical staff in the Advanced Technologies Division of General Research Corporation, Santa Barbara. From 1986 to 1987, he was a visiting research student at the University of Tokyo. After completing his Ph.D., he returned to Japan as a visiting researcher at Osaka University, where he conducted research in systems engineering from 1989 to 1991. When he returned to the United States, he joined the faculty of the UC-Riverside College of Engineering. Dr. Barth is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, the Air and Waste Management Association, the Transportation Research Board Transportation and Air Quality Committee and New Technology Committee, and the ITS America Energy and Environment Committee. He has also served on several National Research Council committees. Dr. Barth received his M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1986 and 1990, respectively. Marcel Bruchez is program manager at the Technology Center for Networks and Pathways and visiting associate research professor in the Department of Chemistry at Carnegie Mellon University. From 1998 to 2005, at Quantum Dot Corporation in Hayward, California, a company he cofounded, Dr. Bruchez was founding scientist and senior scientist in the chemistry division, principal scientist for labels product development, and director of marketing for labels products. He is the author of 12 manuscripts, 12 issued patents, and 20 published patent applications. Dr. Bruchez’s other professional activities include reviewer for Journal of the American Chemical Society, Advanced Materials, Angewandte Chemie, NanoLetters, Nature Materials, Nature Medicine, Nature Methods, and Nature Biotechnology (2002–2003). He is also co-editor of Methods in Molecular Biology: Quantum Dots in Biological Applications (Humana Press, 2006). Dr. Bruchez was the recipient of the Rank Prize Optoelectronics Award (2005) and MIT TR100 Award (2004). In 2003 he was recognized by Science for one of the Top Ten Scientific Innovations of 2003—quantum dots for biological detection. Dr. Bruchez received a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley (1998). W. Dale Compton is the Lillian M. Gilbreth Distinguished Professor of Industrial Engineering, Emeritus, at Purdue University. His research interests include materials science, automotive engineering, combustion engineering, materials engineering, manufacturing engineering, and management of technology. From 1986 to 1988, as the first National Academy of Engineering (NAE) Senior Fellow, Dr. Compton directed activities related to industrial issues and engineering education. He came to NAE from the Ford Motor Company, where he was vice president of research. Before that, he was professor of physics and director of the

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium Coordinated Sciences Laboratory at the University of Illinois. Dr. Compton has served as a consultant to numerous government and industrial organizations and is a fellow of the American Physical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Society of Automotive Engineers, and Engineering Society of Detroit. He has received the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, the University of Illinois College of Engineering Alumni Award for Distinguished Service, and the Science Trailblazers Award from the Detroit Science Center and the Michigan Sesquicentennial Commission. Dr. Compton was elected a member of NAE in 1981 and is currently NAE home secretary. Timothy J. Deming is a professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of California, Los Angeles. Previously, he held positions in the Materials and Chemistry Departments and the Interdepartmental Program of Biomolecular Science and Engineering at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Dr. Deming has received many awards and honors, including the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) Macromolecular Division, Samsung-IUPAC Young Scientist Award from the World Polymer Congress (2004), Materials Research Society Young Investigator Award (2003), Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (2000), Beckman Young Investigator Award (1998), Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow (1998), and National Science Foundation CAREER Award (1997). In 2002, he was a Rothschild-Mayent Foundation Fellow at the Institut Curie in Paris. Dr. Deming is currently a member of the editorial advisory boards of Macromolecules, Macromolecular Bioscience, and Biopolymers. He has also served on numerous professional society and faculty committees and worked with middle-school students. Dr. Deming has filed 11 patent applications. He received a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley (1993). Brenda L. Dietrich is director of mathematical sciences at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. Her areas of research include manufacturing scheduling, services resource management, transportation logistics, integer programming, and combinatorial duality. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Industrial Engineering/Management Science Department of Northwestern University; a member of the Industrial Advisory Board for both the Institute for Mathematics and Its Applications and the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science at Rutgers University; and IBM’s delegate to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Supply Chain 2020 Program. She has participated in numerous conferences of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), Math Programming, Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, Council of Logistics Management, and Association for Operations Management. She holds a dozen patents, has co-authored

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium numerous publications, and has co-edited Mathematics of the Internet: E-Auction and Markets (Springer-Verlag, 2002). Dr. Dietrich has been a member of the INFORMS Roundtable, served on the INFORMS board as vice president for Practice, was chair of the advisory committee for the first two Practice meetings, and is currently the president-elect of INFORMS. In addition, Dr. Dietrich has served on the editorial board of M&SOM and is currently on the editorial board of Logistics Research Quarterly. She received a B.S. in mathematics from the University of North Carolina and an M.S. and Ph.D. in operations research/ industrial engineering from Cornell University. Rebekah Anna Drezek, an associate professor of bioengineering and electrical and computer engineering at Rice University, is affiliated with numerous institutes at Rice, including the Institute for Biosciences and Bioengineering, Computer and Information Technology Institute, Rice Quantum Institute, Center for Biological and Environmental Nanotechnology, and Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology. Among her many awards are the MIT TR100 Award (2004), the Beckman Young Investigator Award (2005), the Coulter Foundation Early Career Translational Research Award (2005), and the American Association for Medical Instrumentation Becton Dickinson Career Achievement Award (2005). She has been an invited speaker or panelist at numerous colloquia, meetings, and workshops, including the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting (2006), the 36th Annual Colloquium on the Physics of Quantum Electronics (2006), and the IEEE International Biomedical Imaging Symposium (2006). Dr. Drezek received her M.S. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, in 1998 and 2001, respectively. Michael P. Johnson is an associate professor of management science and urban affairs at the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests are focused on public-sector facility location and service delivery, especially for affordable housing and sustainable community development. He has taught courses on operations research, decision-support systems, cost-benefit analysis, and a capstone project course for public policy master’s students. His extensive participation in academic service and community affairs has enriched his research and teaching. Dr. Johnson recently co-edited a volume of tutorials in operations research and is currently president of a professional society section on location analysis. He also founded and co-directed the Carnegie Mellon University/University of Pittsburgh Applied Decision Modeling Seminar Series. He recently evaluated plans by the Pittsburgh Public Schools to open, close, and resize various public schools and is currently a member of a committee to redesign the district’s program for gifted students. He has been a member of the board of the Highland Park Community Development Corporation and director of the development of a community plan for the Highland Park neighborhood of Pittsburgh. Dr. Johnson has received

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium master’s degrees in operations research from the University of California, Berkeley, and in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received a Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1997. His previous professional experience includes consulting in logistics, operations management, and information systems. Risto Miikkulainen, professor of computer sciences at the University of Texas at Austin, has conducted recent research on methods of evolving neural networks and applying these methods to game playing, robotics, and intelligent control. He is an author of more than 200 articles on neuroevolution, connectionist natural-language processing, and the computational neuroscience of the visual cortex. Dr. Miikkulainen is an editor of the Machine Learning Journal and Journal of Cognitive Systems Research. He received an M.S. in engineering from the Helsinki University of Technology, Finland (1986), and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California, Los Angeles (1990). Andreas Schäfer is a lecturer (associate professor) in the Department of Architecture and a research associate with the Institute for Aviation and the Environment at the University of Cambridge. He is also a research affiliate with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Previously, he spent five years at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria, and seven years at MIT. Dr. Schäfer has been working for more than 10 years in the area of technology, human behavior, and the environment. His main areas of interest are modeling the demand for energy services, assessing characteristics of greenhouse-gas-emission technologies, and simulating the optimum technology dynamics in a greenhouse-gas-constrained energy system. He has published widely on global travel-demand modeling, transport-system technology assessment, and the introduction of technology. Dr. Schäfer holds an M.Sc. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering and a Ph.D. in energy economics, both from the University of Stuttgart, Germany. Alan Schultz, director of the Navy Center for Applied Research in Artificial Intelligence at the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., conducts research on human-robot interaction, evolutionary robotics, learning in robotic systems, and adaptive systems. The recipient of an Alan Berman Research Publication Award, he has published more than 75 articles on machine learning and robotics. Dr. Schultz is currently co-chair of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) Symposium Series and program chair of the 2007 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Human Robot Interaction. In 2006, he was program co-chair of the 2006 ACM International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction. In 1999 and 2000, he chaired the AAAI Mobile Robot Competition and Exhibitions.

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium Lawrence V. Snyder is the Frank Hook Assistant Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Lehigh University and co-director of Lehigh’s Center for Value Chain Research. His research interests include modeling and solving problems in supply chain management, facility location, and logistics, especially under the threat of disruptions or other sources of uncertainty. His research has received awards from INFORMS and the Institute of Industrial Engineers. He has worked as a supply chain engineer and consultant for major producers of both perishable and durable goods. Dr. Snyder received a Ph.D. in industrial engineering and management sciences from Northwestern University. Morley O. Stone is a former program manager in the Defense Sciences Office of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and principal research biologist and biotechnology lead for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, where he has been a materials research engineer, research biologist, senior research biologist, and biotechnology group leader. In addition, he is an adjunct faculty member in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Ohio State University. His honors and awards include Fellow, AFRL (2005); Carnegie Mellon Alumni Award (2005); Vincent J. Russo Leadership Excellence Award (2003); and MIT TR100 nominee (2003). He is a member of the American Chemical Society, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Materials Research Society. Dr. Stone received a Ph.D. in biochemistry from Carnegie Mellon University (1997). Mark Y.D. Wang is a senior physical scientist at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California, where he works in the area of purchasing and supply chain management, including inventory and multimodal distribution logistics; business process reengineering; acquisition/purchasing strategy. Recent research projects have included improving contracting at the city of Los Angeles Airport, Port, and Department of Water and Power; reverse logistics; high-tech manufacturing; and technology transfer from federally funded research and development. He was associate director of RAND’s National Security Research Division and associate director of RAND’s Science and Technology Policy Institute. Dr. Wang received an Sc.D. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1994. Lloyd Watts is founder, chair, and chief technology officer of Audience Inc., a venture-backed company in Silicon Valley developing high-performance audio-signal processing systems for the telecommunications industry. He has worked at Microtel Pacific Research, Synaptics, Arithmos, and Interval Research. He received a B.Sc. in engineering physics from Queen’s University (1984), an M.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from Simon Fraser University (1989), and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (1992).

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Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2006 Symposium Susan Zielinski is managing director of SMART (Sustainable Transportation and Access Research and Transformation) at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor; SMART is a project of the Center for Advancing Research and Solutions for Society (CARSS). Just before joining SMART/CARSS, Ms. Zielinski spent a year as a Harvard Loeb Fellow working on New Mobility innovation and leadership. Prior to 2004, she co-founded and directed Moving the Economy, an innovative Canada-wide “link tank” that catalyzes and supports New Mobility industry development. For more than 15 years, she was a transportation planner for the city of Toronto, where she worked on developing and leading transportation and air-quality policies and initiatives, with a focus on sustainable transportation/New Mobility. Ms. Zielinski has been an advisor to local, national, and international initiatives, including the National Advisory Committee on Energy Efficiency, Transport Canada’s Sustainable Development Advisory Committee, Gridlock Panel of the Ontario Smart Growth Initiative, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Environmentally Sustainable Transport Project, the jury of the Stockholm Partnerships for Sustainable Cities, the European Conference of Transport Ministers, the Centre for Sustainable Transportation, and the Kyoto Cities Initiative International Advisory Panel. After receiving her undergraduate degree from the University of Toronto and a graduate fellowship to study for a year in France, she received a master’s degree in environmental studies from York University. She is a registered professional planner and a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners.

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