Appendixes



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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping Appendixes

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping This page intentionally left blank.

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping APPENDIX A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff David R. Maidment, Chair, is the Hussein M. Alharthy Centennial Chair in Civil Engineering and director of the Center for Research in Water Resources at the University of Texas at Austin, where he has been on the faculty since 1981. Prior to joining the University of Texas, he was a research scientist at the Ministry of Works and Development in New Zealand and at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Vienna, Austria; he was also a visiting assistant professor at Texas A&M University. Dr. Maidment teaches, conducts research, and publishes in surface water hydrology, in particular the application of geographic information systems (GIS) to hydrology. He is currently project manager on a collaborative National Science Foundation (NSF) research project for the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI), which is developing a hydrologic information system (HIS) for data-intensive hydrologic research and its evolution. He also has longstanding collaborations with Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) Inc. and the Hydrologic Engineering Center of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. In 2002, he received a Hydrologic Benchmark Award from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for contributions to the USGS National Water-Use Information Program and was elected a fellow of the International Water Resources Association. In 2003, he received ESRI’s Lifetime Achievement Award for his contributions to the application of GIS in water resources and was made a national associate of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. He has chaired or been a member of four National Research Council (NRC) committees. He received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural engineering from the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Scott Edelman is the president of Watershed Concepts, a division of Hayes, Seay, Mattern and Mattern, Inc., a national architectural and engineering firm. He has been active in the field of floodplain data acquisition and interpretation for mapping and analysis for 25 years and is a recognized expert in hydrology and hydraulics. His direct experience in this specialized engineering field includes managing numerous watershed studies, with responsibilities including project scheduling, coordination, field work, design, and quality control. As president of Watershed Concepts, he is responsible for all watershed modeling

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping and stormwater management plans within the firm; many of these projects involve extensive programming tasks. Watershed Concepts stays abreast of and is a large user of mapping technologies for floodplain mapping and has used light detection and ranging (lidar) and interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) to produce flood maps for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). He received a B.S. in civil engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. Elvin R. (Vald) Heiberg III (lieutenant general, U.S. Army, retired) (NAE) is former chief of engineers of the U.S. Army. He is president of Heiberg Associates, Inc., and a member of the National Academy of Construction. His primary background is in “government engineering,” from his 35 years in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. During that time, and in the time since military retirement, he has become well acquainted with engineering and construction issues, in both the public and the private sectors, that relate to (1) environmental engineering (twice chief executive officer of cleanup firms); (2) privatization issues; (3) infrastructure issues; (4) streamlined and improved government acquisition (of engineering and construction services); and (5) water- and harbor-related projects. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous NRC boards and committees, including the Transportation Research Board’s executive committee, the Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems, the Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, chair of the Federal Facilities Council, and the Board on Army Science and Technology. Mr. Heiberg has a B.S. from the U.S. Military Academy (West Point), an M.S. in civil engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and an M.A. in government and M.S. in administration from the George Washington University. John R. Jensen has been a Carolina distinguished professor at the University of South Carolina since 1986. He has taught previously at the University of Georgia and has worked in remote sensing at the University of California, Santa Barbara and Aero Service Corporation. He has been the major professor for 60 master’s students and 29 Ph.D.s in geography specializing in remote sensing of the environment. All of these graduates currently work in the field of remote sensing. In 2004 he received the John E. Estes Excellence in Teaching Award from the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. His remote sensing research has focused on (1) remote sensing of coastal and inland wetland biophysical characteristics (e.g., biomass, leaf-area index); (2) development of improved digital image processing algorithms to extract and model change in wetland and urban-suburban land use; (3) development of error evaluation statistics for assessing the accuracy of multiple-date change detection products; (4) improvement of remote sensing and GIS-supported coastal environmental sensitivity index (ESI) mapping used worldwide for protecting coastal resources in the event of an oil spill; (5) modeling water quality parameters (e.g., chlorophyll,

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping dissolved inorganic matter, suspended sediment) in estuaries and reservoirs using high spatial and spectral resolution remote sensor data; (6) extraction of improved digital elevation models (DEMs) using photogrammetry and lidar; and (7) development of remote sensing-assisted spatial decision support systems (SDSS) to monitor hazardous waste sites. He has published more than 120 refereed journal articles and 60 chapters in books, and presented approximately 270 papers at national and international professional meetings. He was president of the 7,000-member American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) in 1995-1996 and is an ASPRS fellow. He majored in physical geography and specialized in analytical cartography and remote sensing at the following institutions: California State University at Fullerton (B.A.), Brigham Young University (M.A.), and University of California, Los Angeles (Ph.D.). David F. Maune (colonel, U.S. Army, retired) is a senior project manager for Dewberry and Davis in Fairfax, Virginia. His military mapping, charting, and geodesy career started in 1963 and included many different positions such as director of the Defense Mapping School and commander and director of the U.S. Army Topographic Engineering Center (TEC). After retirement, Dr. Maune joined Dewberry and Davis where he manages mapping contracts for the USGS, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), FEMA, and multiple states. He was instrumental in FEMA’s transition to using lidar data for hydrologic and hydraulic (H&H) modeling and is recognized as an industry leader in the use of lidar data for floodplain mapping. He has written FEMA’s standards for aerial mapping and surveying, including using lidar technology for cost-effective H&H modeling. He was the principal author of the National Height Modernization Study—Report to Congress, published by NOAA’s National Geodetic Survey in 1998. He has been an active member of ASPRS since 1968. He authored the DEM chapter of Digital Photogrammetry: An Addendum to the Manual of Photogrammetry, published by ASPRS in 1996. He edited the first and second editions of Digital Elevation Model Technologies and Application: The DEM Users Manual, published by ASPRS in 2001 and 2007. He is an ASPRS-certified photogrammetrist as well as a certified floodplain manager for the Association of State Floodplain Managers (ASFPM). He has an M.S. and a Ph.D. in geodetic science and photogrammetry from Ohio State University. Karen Schuckman is the geospatial technology leader at URS Corporation, Gaithersburg, Maryland, where she provides expert knowledge in remote sensing, photogrammetry, and GIS in support of a broad variety of engineering practice areas, including disaster response and preparedness, transportation and critical infrastructure, and environmental planning. Most recently, she has been supporting Hurricane Katrina, Rita, and Wilma rapid response, recovery, and mitigation activities. Prior to URS, Ms. Schuckman was with EarthData International where she held several positions including geospatial applications director

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping for EarthData Solutions, the organization’s GIS arm; senior vice-president of EarthData Technologies, the organization’s research and development group; and president and general manager of EarthData’s North Carolina office, where she was a collaborator in designing and implementing the first-of-its-kind lidar statewide floodplain mapping program for the State of North Carolina. Prior to joining the private sector, she worked for the USGS National Mapping Division, in Menlo Park, California. She is active in ASPRS and has held numerous offices within that organization, including ASPRS president in 2005. She has a B.S. in meteorology and has done graduate work in meteorology, geography, and civil engineering (surveying and photogrammetry). She has recently joined the geography faculty at the Pennsylvania State University and will be instructing courses in remote sensing and lidar in the World Campus Certificate in Geographic Information Systems, Geospatial Intelligence, and master’s of GIS programs. Ramesh Shrestha is a professor of the Division of Geosensing Systems Engineering (GSE) in the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering at the University of Florida (UF). His main research activities are associated with the application of advanced geodetic and remote sensing techniques, particularly airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM), ground-based laser scanning, and airborne digital photography, to the study of geosurficial processes and engineering problems. Recent research projects have included mapping erosion of sandy beaches; post-hurricane evaluation of beach and dune areas; identifying landslide areas and quantifying slide movements; and evaluating ALSM, ground-based laser scanning, and digital photography for detecting and locating obstructions near airports. He teaches graduate courses in geodesy, geodetic positioning including the Global Positioning System (GPS), adjustment computations, and geodetic surveys. He is the principal investigator for the NSF-funded National Center for Airborne Laser Mapping (NCALM), which is operated jointly by UF and the Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley. He is also the director of the Geosensing Engineering and Mapping (GEM) Research Center for Natural Disasters, the mission and goals of which are to provide state-of-the-art research capabilities in geosensing systems engineering (GSE) and mapping using new and evolving technologies. He leads the GSE academic group and the Optech Center for Excellence in Laser Mapping, and manages the ALSM research laboratory. He is a member of the American Geophysical Union. He has a B.S. in land surveying sciences, an M.S. in civil Engineering, and a Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering. National Research Council Staff Elizabeth A. Eide, Study Director, is a senior program officer with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources at the National Academies. Her areas of expertise include geochronology

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Elevation Data for Floodplain Mapping and petrology applied to crustal processes. Prior to joining the Academies, she worked for the Geological Survey of Norway managing a noble gas geochronology laboratory, and administrating personnel, budget and research programs in geology and geophysics. She received her Ph.D. in geology from Stanford University and a B.A. in geology from Franklin and Marshall College. Jared P. Eno is a senior program assistant with the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Before coming to the National Academies, he interned at Human Rights Watch’s Arms Division, working on the 2004 edition of the Landmine Monitor Report. Jared received his A.B. in physics from Brown University.