E
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Invited Speakers, and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc. (Chair), is professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, where she holds the Robert B. Jaffe, M.D., endowed chair in the reproductive sciences. She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an M.D. from Stanford University, after postdoctoral training at Rockefeller University and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Giudice completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Stanford University and Washington University in St. Louis and was a fellow in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Stanford. In 1987, she joined the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine and in 2005 was named the Stanley McCormick memorial professor emerita. While at Stanford, Dr. Giudice served as founding director of the Center for Research on Reproduction, Women’s Health and Genomic Medicine and was director of the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Division from 1994 to 2005. Dr. Giudice was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2002 and has been affiliated with the Institute for Stem Cell and Tissue Biology at the University of California, San Francisco, since 2005, where she serves on the Gamete, Embryo, and Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee, the Stem Cell Research Coordinating Committee, and the Stem Cell Research Program Committee. She has a major interest in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer from the perspective of policy and human subject protection. Her research focuses on disorders of the endometrium leading to infertility and pregnancy disorders and translating findings to diagnostics and therapeutics for women



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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report E Biographical Sketches of Committee Members, Invited Speakers, and Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS Linda C. Giudice, M.D., Ph.D., M.Sc. (Chair), is professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, where she holds the Robert B. Jaffe, M.D., endowed chair in the reproductive sciences. She received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an M.D. from Stanford University, after postdoctoral training at Rockefeller University and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Giudice completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Stanford University and Washington University in St. Louis and was a fellow in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Stanford. In 1987, she joined the faculty of the Stanford University School of Medicine and in 2005 was named the Stanley McCormick memorial professor emerita. While at Stanford, Dr. Giudice served as founding director of the Center for Research on Reproduction, Women’s Health and Genomic Medicine and was director of the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Division from 1994 to 2005. Dr. Giudice was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 2002 and has been affiliated with the Institute for Stem Cell and Tissue Biology at the University of California, San Francisco, since 2005, where she serves on the Gamete, Embryo, and Stem Cell Research Oversight Committee, the Stem Cell Research Coordinating Committee, and the Stem Cell Research Program Committee. She has a major interest in human embryonic stem cells and somatic cell nuclear transfer from the perspective of policy and human subject protection. Her research focuses on disorders of the endometrium leading to infertility and pregnancy disorders and translating findings to diagnostics and therapeutics for women

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report with infertility and endometriosis and related disorders. Clinically, her focus is on patients needing assisted reproduction, as well as ovulatory dysfunction and endometriosis. Ezra C. Davidson, Jr., M.D., is associate dean of primary care and professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. He currently is also a professor in obstetrics and gynecology at the David Geffen School of Medicine of the University of California, Los Angeles. He was chief of service in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the King/Drew Medical Center in Los Angeles from 1991 to 1996. Dr. Davidson is currently president of the Association of Academic Minority Physicians and a member of the Board of Governors of the Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health. Dr. Davidson has a major interest in maternal and child health and has had many roles in public policy related to women’s reproductive health and infant health. He is currently a member of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program and of the California State Department of Health Services’ Black Infant Health Leadership Committee. He chaired the federal health and human services secretary’s Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality from 1991 to 1995 and served as president of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists from 1990 to 1991. He received his B.S. in zoology from Morehouse College and his M.D. from Meharry Medical College. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been involved in a number of study committees on issues of national health policy. He cochaired the Committee on Perinatal Transmission of HIV and served as a member of the IOM Committee on the Impact of Pregnancy Weight on Maternal and Child Health. Naihua Duan, Ph.D., is professor in residence in the departments of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Science and Biostatistics and the Jane and Terry Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). He is also director of methods core at the UCLA/RAND Center for Research on Quality in Managed Care. He has been involved in health services research for more than 20 years, working on innovative design paradigms for clinical and public health research. Dr. Duan was corporate chair and senior RAND fellow in statistics from 1979 to 2000. He currently serves as member of the Editorial Board for Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology, the Scientific Advisory Board of the Prevention

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report Center for Families in Stress at Arizona State University, and the National Institute of Mental Health’s Review Committee on Mental Health Services in Mental Health Specialty Settings. He served on the Advisory Committee for the 2005 International Conference on Health Policy Research, and as director of methods core for the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services at the Charles R. Drew University, RAND, and UCLA. He received his B.S. in mathematics from National Taiwan University and his Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Dr. Duan has also served as a member of the National Academies/Institute of Medicine’s Committees on Organ Procurement and Transplantation Policy, Advances on Assessing Human Exposure to Airborne Pollutants, and Carbon Monoxide Episodes in Meteorological and Topographical Problem Areas. Bernard L. Harlow, Ph.D., is a Mayo professor of public health and the division head of epidemiology and community health at the University of Minnesota. He is also an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. Previously, he was assistant professor (1989-1996) and associate professor (1996-2005) of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School, and associate professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health from 1999 to 2005. He was also the co-director of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Epidemiology Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital from 1990 to 2005. Dr. Harlow has published extensively in the area of women’s reproductive and mental health. Currently, he is a member of the National Institutes of Health–Center for Scientific Review’s Reproductive Epidemiology Study Section and the Advisory Board of the Center of Excellence in Women’s Health at the University of Minnesota, and he has served on a number of federally sponsored special emphasis panels on reproductive health research. Dr. Harlow is on the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Epidemiology and has reviewed manuscripts for many top-tier medical journals, including Fertility and Sterility, the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and the New England Journal of Medicine. He received his B.S. from the University of Rhode Island, his M.P.H. in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota, and his Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of Washington.

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report Susan C. Klock, Ph.D., is professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Department of Psychiatry at Northwestern University as well as a clinical psychologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital. She was director of the Women’s Mental Health Service from 1992 to 1994 and associate clinical psychologist in medicine from 1991 to 1994, both at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She was also assistant professor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut Medical School from 1989 to 1991 and instructor in the Division of Psychiatry, Department of Medicine, at Harvard Medical School from 1991 to 1994. Dr. Klock has been involved in multiple activities related to the psychological aspects of infertility and ovum donation. Currently, she serves as chair of the Regulation Task Force of the Mental Health Professional Group for the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and of the Credentialing Committee for the International Infertility Counseling Organization. She was member of the Oocyte Donation Task Force, Psychological Interest Group of ASRM from 1991 to 1993, and a member of the Embryo Donation Task Force of National RESOLVE from 2002 to 2004. Her research addresses the mental health aspects of infertility, in vitro fertilization, and ovum donation. She received her B.A. in psychology and computer science from Butler University and her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Bowling Green State University. Judith LaRosa, PhD, RN, FAAN, is deputy director of the Masters of Public Health Program and professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center. She served as professor and chair of community health sciences at the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine from 1996 to 1999. Dr. LaRosa has extensive experience in public policy on women’s health. She was director of the Tulane Xavier National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health from 1998 to 1999, associate project director at the National Science Foundation’s Louisiana Project from 1994 to 1999, and deputy director of the Office of Research on Women’s Health at the National Institutes of Health. She is also a journal reviewer for various public health and women’s health publications, including the American Journal of Public Health, the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Women’s Association, and the Journal of Women’s Health. She received her B.S. in nursing and M.N.Ed. from the University of Pittsburgh and her Ph.D. in health education from the University of Mary-

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report land. She has served as a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committees on Understanding the Biology of Sex and Gender Differences and Defense Women’s Health Research. Catherine Racowsky, Ph.D., HCLD, is associate professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School and director of the Assisted Reproductive Technology Laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She was associate professor at the University of Arizona from 1991 to 1997 and director of the Assisted Reproductive Technology Laboratory at the University of Arizona Medical Center from 1991 to 1997. Dr. Racowsky is currently a member of the Assisted Reproductive Technology Ethics Committee, the Center for Reproductive Medicine Leadership Committee, and the Partners’ Embryonic Stem Cell Research Oversight, all at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. She also serves as president of the New England Fertility Society and as a member of the Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the International Stem Cell Guidelines Task Force of the International Society for Stem Cell Research. In addition to her extensive clinical experience with assisted reproductive technology, she has an extensive publication record on oocyte maturation and embryo development and has been involved in other activities in this field throughout her career. Previously, she was a member of the Executive Council of the Society for Assisted Reproduction Technology (2004-2006) and member of the Editorial Board of Reproductive Toxicology (1997-2001) and Human Fertility (2004-2006). She received her B.A. from the University of Oxford and her Ph.D. in reproductive physiology from the University of Cambridge, England. She was a Lalor Foundation fellow in reproduction from 1976 to 1977 and a Research fellow in reproduction from 1976 to 1977, both at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Racowsky participated as a discussant at the Institute of Medicine’s Workshop on Guidelines for Human Embyonic Stem Cell Research. Zev Rosenwaks, M.D., is the Revlon distinguished professor of reproductive medicine in obstetrics and gynecology and professor of reproductive medicine in the Cornell Institute for Reproductive Medicine, both at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. He is the director and physician-in-chief of the Center for Reproductive Medicine and Infertility and attending obstetrician-gynecologist, all at New York Presbyterian Hospital–Weill Cornell. He is an internationally recognized authority on reproductive endocrinology and infertility with an extensive

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report publication record in this area. He is also a founding pioneer of assisted reproductive technologies. Dr. Rosenwaks is a diplomate and fellow of the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He has also been involved in many national and international activities related to assisted reproductive technology (ART) and in vitro fertilization (IVF). Dr. Rosenwaks was president of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinologists from 1987 to 1988, president of the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technologies from 1991 to 1992 and a member of the International Advisory Committee for the Sixth World Congress on IVF and ART in 1987 and for the Ninth World Congress in 1995. He is currently a member of the Editorial Board for Assisted Reproduction News and Seminars in Reproductive Endocrinology, and editor of the Journal of Assisted Reproductive Technology/Andrology (ARTA). Dr. Rosenwaks was also a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of the Weill Medical College Encyclopedia of Health and Healing. He received his B.A. in biology from the City University of New York and his M.D. from the State University of New York–Downstate Medical Center. Joe L. Simpson, M.D., is professor of obstetrics and gynecology and professor of molecular and human genetics at Baylor College of Medicine. From 1994 to 2006 he was Ernst W. Bertner chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Baylor. From 1986 to 1994 he was faculty professor and chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Tennessee. Prior to that he was head of the Section of Human Genetics and professor of obstetrics and gynecology, both at Northwestern University Medical School. Dr. Simpson is a leading researcher in the field of reproductive genetics, specifically in prenatal genetic diagnosis, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, and the genetics of gynecologic disorders, including premature ovarian failure. He has written a dozen major books, and approximately 650 chapters and peer-reviewed articles. He has served on over a dozen editorial boards, including the American Journal of Medical Genetics, Prenatal Diagnosis, Reproductive Biomedicine Online, the Journal of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation, and Human Reproduction Update. He was president of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) from 1993 to 1994 and president of the Society for Gynecologic Investigation (SGI) from 1998 to 1999. He is currently president of the Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis International Society (PGDIS) and president-elect of the American College of Medical Genetics (ACMG). He is a current member of the Board of Scientific Counselors of the Na-

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report tional Institute of Child Health and Human Development and previously served on its Advisory Council. He is on the March of Dimes Scientific Advisory Committee. Dr. Simpson majored in chemistry at Duke University and received his M.D. from the Duke University Medical School in 1968. Postgraduate training in pediatrics (internship), obstetrics and gynecology (residency) and genetics was taken at Cornell Medical School–New York Hospital. He has been a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1994, serving on the Maternal and Child Health and Human Development Committee and the Committee on Improving Birth Outcomes in Developing Countries. INVITED SPEAKERS Kurt T. Barnhart, M.D., M.S.C.E., is the director of the Center for Clinical Research in Women’s Health, associate director of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, and associate professor in both the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and the Department of Epidemiology, all at the University of Pennsylvania. He received his medical degree from Mount Sinai School of Medicine and his M.S.C.E. degree (clinical epidemiology and biostatistics) from the University of Pennsylvania. He is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology as well as reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Dr. Barnhart is currently on the Executive Board of the Society of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (SREI) and the Association of Reproductive Health Care Professionals (ARHP). He is also on the Editorial Board for the journals Fertility and Sterility and Menopausal Medicine. His research efforts regarding reproduction, family planning, early pregnancy, and menopause have been published in such journals as the New England Journal of Medicine, the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, the Journal of the American Medical Association, Fertility and Sterility, and Human Reproduction. Nicholas Cataldo, M.D., is a former assistant professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stanford University. After attending Harvard Medical School, he completed his residency in obstetrics/gynecology at Stanford and his fellowship in reproductive endocrinology at the University of California, San Francisco. Board certified in reproductive endocrinology and infertility, Dr. Cataldo has cared for patients with fertility and ovulation disorders and has been active in

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report both basic and clinical research on ovarian function. His major interest and recent publications center around polycystic ovarian syndrome and therapies for the ovarian abnormality that leads to ovulation failure in this disorder. Marcelle Cedars, M.D., is professor, director of the Center for Reproductive Health and Reproductive Laboratories, and vice-chair of clinical affairs, all in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of California, San Francisco. In the past, she has been director of IVF programs and/or laboratories at the University of California, Los Angeles, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. She is board certified in both reproductive endocrinology and obstetrics and gynecology. She has served on the Editorial Board of Fertility and Sterility and is currently a member of the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology for the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is the chair of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Panel on Obstetrical and Gynecological Devices. Dr. Cedars received her M.D. from Southwestern Medical School. Her clinical and research endeavors involve polycystic ovarian syndrome, perimenopause, and assisted reproduction. John Collins, M.D., is professor emeritus at McMaster University and adjunct professor at Dalhousie University. He was department chair at McMaster University from 1983 to 1993 and acting chair from 1996 to 1998. His clinical practice involved reproductive endocrinology and infertility. Dr. Collins received his M.D. and postgraduate training in Obstetrics and Gynecology from the University of Western Ontario. A previous member of the editorial boards of the New England Journal of Medicine, Fertility and Sterility, Human Reproduction Update and Evidence-Based Medicine, he is now on the Editorial Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is an associate editor of Human Reproduction. He is a former president of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada, the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society, and the Association of Professors of Obstetrics and Gynecology. He is currently a consultant to the Practice Committee of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Dr. Collins’s research, which has been reported in more than 150 peer-reviewed publications, involves the evaluation of outcomes, such as the effectiveness, safety, and cost of interventions for reproductive health disorders and the long-term cardiovascular and can-

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report cer outcomes associated with use of oral contraception and hormone treatment. David Guzick, M.D., Ph.D., is dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Rochester. He was the Henry A. Thiede professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Rochester from 1995 until 2002. He is also former director of reproductive endocrinology at Magee Women’s Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Guzick received his graduate degrees from New York University and is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and reproductive endocrinology. He has served on several National Institutes of Health scientific advisory committees. Dr. Guzick has published extensively on infertility and reproductive endocrinology. Ana Alvarez Murphy, M.D., is Brooks professor and chair of obstetrics and gynecology at the Medical College of Georgia. She is board certified in obstetrics and gynecology and reproductive endocrinology. She was formerly the Anne Bates Winship Leach professor of gynecology, obstetrics and reproductive endocrinology and director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, both at Emory University School of Medicine. Dr. Murphy received her M.D. from the University of Michigan Medical School. She currently serves on the Editorial Board of Fertility Today. She has also served on numerous National Institutes of Health scientific advisory committees and is an active member of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, the American Fertility Society, and the Society for Gynecological Investigation. She has published extensively in the field of women’s reproductive health. Roberta B. Ness, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of epidemiology, medicine, and obstetrics/gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh. She is chair of the Department of Epidemiology and director of its Women’s Health Program. She was previously assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania and director of cancer epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Dr. Ness received her M.D. from Cornell University and her M.P.H from Columbia University. She has served on various scientific advisory committees on women’s health. Her specific areas of interest include studies in the epidemiology of reproductive cancers, preeclampsia, and pelvic inflammatory disease.

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report Lawrence Ching Tsen, M.D., is associate professor in anesthesia at Harvard Medical School and director of anesthesia at the Center for Reproductive Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He is on the Editorial Board of the journals Obstetric Anesthesia Digest and International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia. He is also an active member of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology, the Massachusetts Society of Anesthesiologists, the American Society for Anesthesiologists, and the International Anesthesia Research Society. Dr. Tsen received his M.D. from the University of Kansas School of Medicine. His research aims to improve the quality and safety of obstetric analgesia and anesthesia. STAFF Amy Haas is the administrative assistant for the Board on Health Sciences Policy. She previously served as a senior project assistant for the Clinical Research Roundtable. Prior to joining the Institute of Medicine, she worked as a project manager for a medical education and publishing firm in Washington, DC. She graduated from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, with a B.A. in biology. Andrew Pope, Ph.D., is director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope’s previous research activities focused on the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the enhancement of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed studies on priority-setting processes at the National Institutes of Health, fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties, and organ procurement and transplantation. Eileen Santa, M.A., has been a research associate at the Institute of Medicine for two years. She earned her masters in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts, where she is currently a doctoral

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Assessing the Medical Risks of Human Oocyte Donation for Stem Cell Research: Workshop Report candidate. Her research focuses on the cultural factors that contribute to healthy outcomes for Latina mothers and children. Frances E. Sharples, M.A., Ph.D., has served as the director of the National Research Council’s Board on Life Sciences since October 2000. Immediately prior to this position, she was a senior policy analyst for the Environment Division of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) for four years. Dr. Sharples came to OSTP from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where she served in various positions in the Environmental Sciences Division between 1978 and 1996, most recently as a research and development section head. Dr. Sharples received her B.A. in biology from Barnard College and her M.A. and Ph.D. in zoology from the University of California, Davis. She served as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) environmental science and engineering fellow at the Environmental Protection Agency during the summer of 1981, and as a AAAS congressional science and engineering fellow in the office of Senator Al Gore in 1984-1985. She was a member of the National Institutes of Health’s Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee in the mid-1980s and was elected a fellow of the AAAS in 1992.

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