Appendixes



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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft Appendixes

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Kenneth E. Eickmann, Chair (Air Force, retired), whose leadership accomplishments include having led the federal rescue and recovery efforts following the 1995 bombing of Oklahoma City’s Alfred P. Murrah Building, served as the director of the Construction Industry Institute (CII) at the University of Texas (UT) at Austin from June 1998 to October 2003. CII, a nonprofit research institute, is the principal national forum for the multitrillion-dollar-a-year construction industry. The more than 100 member companies of the institute are dedicated to improving the cost, schedule, quality, safety, security, and operability of constructed facilities. CII annually funds $5 million in research at 30 U.S. universities to improve the total quality and cost effectiveness of the construction industry. General Eickmann’s recent accomplishments include selection as a distinguished engineering graduate of the University of Texas; selection for membership of the National Academy of Construction; selection as chairman of a General Officer Red Team, formed to review the logistics transformation efforts of the U.S. Air Force; and selection to serve on a National Research Council committee formed to evaluate the feasibility of achieving the science and technology requirements implied in the National Aerospace Initiative. He completed 22 assignments, including a stint from 1994 to 1996 as commander, Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center, Tinker Air Force Base. His last assignment on active duty was commander, Aeronautical Systems Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. As commander, he chaired a consortium partnering the U.S. Department of Defense, the aerospace industry, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to increase competitiveness in the aerospace industry. General Eickmann currently serves as the vice chairman of the Texas Engineers’ Task Force on Homeland Security and recently formed an executive placement company, The Eickmann Group, dedicated to the placement of retired military leaders in industry. General Eickmann earned a B.S. in mechanical engineering from UT Austin in 1967, an M.S. in systems engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology in 1968, and is a graduate of the University of Michigan Executive Business Program and the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, military systems acquisition, and systems engineering.

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft Natalie W. Crawford (NAE), Vice Chair, is vice president of the RAND Corporation and director of Project Air Force (PAF). It is her responsibility to ensure that the research agenda PAF addresses each year reflects those problems of greatest enduring importance to the Air Force, and that the research is of the highest possible quality and responsiveness. In addition, she must ensure that the PAF workforce is not only matched to the Air Force’s research needs but that it is renewed. She has worked at the RAND Corporation for 40+ years and has deep, substantive technical and operational knowledge and experience in areas such as conventional weapons, attack and surveillance avionics, fighter and bomber aircraft performance, aircraft survivability, electronic combat, theater missile defense, force modernization, space systems and capabilities, and nonkinetic operations. She was a member of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board since 1988 and was its vice chair in 1990 and co-chair from 1996 to 1999. She has served on numerous advisory committees. She received the Air Force Analytic Community’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the Vance R. Wanner Memorial Award from the Military Operations Research Society in 2003. She received the Department of the Air Force Decoration for Exceptional Civilian Service in 2003 and 1995. Mrs. Crawford has a B.A. in mathematics from UCLA, where she also pursued graduate study in applied mathematics and engineering. Dilip R. Ballal graduated from the Cranfield Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Currently, he is head of the Energy and Environmental Engineering Division at the University of Dayton. As division head, Dr. Ballal has overall responsibility for the direction and successful completion of basic and applied research in aerospace fuel science, fuels engineering, combustion, environmental engineering, modeling and simulation, and energy conservation. He joined the university in April 1983 as the leader of aerospace fuels and combustion group in the Research Institute. He has over 35 years of research experience in academia and industry. Dr. Ballal is also the Hans von Ohain Distinguished Professor in mechanical and aerospace engineering and director of the von Ohain Fuels and Combustion Center at the University of Dayton. His expertise in fuels, combustion, and emissions requirements of advanced propulsion systems has led to improvements in gas turbine combustor technology. Meyer J. Benzakein (NAE) received a B.S. in mechanical engineering in 1960. He received an M.S.M.E. in 1963 and a Ph.D. in engineering mechanics in 1967. He joined General Electric in 1967. There he served in a number of positions in advanced technology and project and product engineering. He led the CFM56 engineering program from 1984 to 1993 and the GE90 engineering program from 1993 to 1995. In February 1995, Dr. Benzakein became general manager for engine systems design and integration, in which capacity he was responsible for engineering leadership and technical oversight of GE-Evendale’s commercial and military aircraft engines. In January 1996, Dr. Benzakein took over the position of general manager, Advanced Engineering Programs. He maintained that position until he retired, in October 2004. He was responsible for leading the technology development efforts and the new commercial and military engines development programs. In January 2005, Dr. Benzakein joined the faculty of Ohio State University, where he is currently chair of the Aerospace Engineering Department and co-director of the Ohio Center for Advanced Propulsion and Power. Dr. Benzakein’s experience on NAS committees includes membership on the Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences (DEPS) Aerospace Engineering Peer Committee, the DEPS Committee on Review of NASA’s Next Generation Launch Technology program, and the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee for developing an aviation environmental design tool. Dr. Benzakein received the Gold Medal Award from the Royal Aeronautical Society in 2001. He was elected as a fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society in 2002 and a fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) in 2004.

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft John-Paul B. Clarke is an associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where his research and teaching address optimization and robustness in aircraft and airline operations, air traffic management, and the environmental impact of aviation. He received S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was a faculty member there prior to moving to Georgia Institute of Technology. He has also been a researcher at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and a visiting scholar at the Boeing Company. Dr. Clarke is a member of the Airline Group of the International Federation of Operations Research Societies, the AIAA, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the Institute of Navigation, and Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. He serves on several national and international committees, including the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (ASEB) of the National Research Council, the FAA Research Engineering and Development Committee, the Airspace Systems Program Subcommittee of the NASA Aerospace Research Advisory Committee, the AIAA Air Transportation Systems Technical Committee, and the Aircraft Noise Committee of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Dr. Clarke was the first director of the Partnership for Air Transportation Noise and Emissions Research (PARTNER), the Center of Excellence for Aviation Noise and Aircraft Emissions Mitigation, and is an active researcher in both PARTNER and the National Center of Excellence for Aviation Operations Research. In 1999, he was awarded the AIAA/American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE)/Airport Consultants Council (ACC) Jay Hollingsworth Speas Airport Award, and in 2003 he was awarded the FAA Excellence in Aviation Award. David E. (Ed) Crow (NAE) graduated from the University of Missouri-Rolla with a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering. Dr. Crow joined the faculty of the University of Connecticut as a distinguished professor-in-residence in the mechanical engineering department after a distinguished career in industry. He joined Pratt & Whitney in 1966, rising to the position of senior vice president of Pratt & Whitney’s engineering organization, where he was responsible for the design, development, validation, and certification of all Pratt & Whitney large commercial engines, military engines, and rocket products. He also led the research and development of advanced technologies systems to meet future aircraft requirements. Dr. Crow previously held the position of senior vice president for Pratt & Whitney’s large commercial engines organization, which included the PW4000 and JT9D high-thrust family of products. Dr. Crow is a past secretary of the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE), and a member of both the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and AIAA. In addition to having served as president of Pi Tau Sigma, he has served on the Engineering Advisory Board at Clarkson University and is an elected member of the Academy of Mechanical Engineers at the University of Missouri-Rolla. His expertise is in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and rocket propulsion engineering. Alan H. Epstein (NAE) received B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is currently the R.C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and the director of MIT’s Gas Turbine Laboratory. His responsibilities include teaching and research in aerospace propulsion, fluid mechanics, power production, and microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS). He has been an active consultant to industry and government for over 25 years. His activities have included gas turbine design and operation, MEMS, system testing and advanced instrumentation, military infrared systems, and vehicle observable technology. Dr. Epstein is a fellow of the AIAA and the ASME and a member of the NRC’s Board on Army Science and Technology (BAST).

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft Frank C. Gillette, Jr., received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Florida. Mr. Gillette retired from Pratt & Whitney in 1998, after 36 years of service, and now actively consults with Pratt & Whitney Large Military Engines, also performing reviews of Sikorsky helicopters and assessing damage tolerance of their aircraft. During his time at Pratt & Whitney, he played a major role in designing and developing almost every engine that powers the U.S. Air Force frontline fighter aircraft. As director of the F119 engine, he was responsible for the JAFE, YF-119, and F119 EMDPs. During these programs, he developed a thrust vectoring supercruise engine for the U.S. Air Force’s new F-22 Raptor fighter. Mr. Gillette is currently a consultant for United Technologies and Belcan Corporation and participates in the final design reviews for the Belcan Corporation. He is active at the University of Florida and recently completed the search for dean of engineering and is on the Engineering Advisory Committee of the University of Florida Foundation board of directors. He is an active fellow in the ASME and an associate fellow of the AIAA. His expertise is in military systems acquisition, propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, and space science. Brig Gen Wilfred Goodson retired from the Air Force in 1985 as the assistant chief of staff, studies, and analyses and commander of the Air Force Center for Studies and Analyses, Air Force Headquarters, Washington, D.C. He received a B.S. degree in basic sciences and engineering sciences and was commissioned a second lieutenant following graduation from the Air Force Academy in 1960. An Olmstead scholar, he began his study at the Defense Language School, Washington, D.C., in February 1964, and in September 1964 moved to Germany and entered the University of Heidelberg, where he received his doctorate in theoretical astrophysics in 1966. He graduated from the National War College in 1975. He is a senior pilot with 2,500 flying hours. His military decorations and awards include the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Bronze Star Medal, Meritorious Service Medal with oak leaf cluster, Air Medal with six oak leaf clusters, Air Force Commendation Medal, and Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with palm. Jeffrey W. Hamstra graduated from the University of Michigan with an M.S. in aerospace engineering. Mr. Hamstra is currently a Lockheed Martin fellow in propulsion integration and is responsible for providing technical consultation and guidance, conducting program reviews, and ensuring technical integrity in the propulsion discipline across the entire Lockheed Martin aero enterprise. He has 20 years of experience in jet propulsion systems integration at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company and its Heritage organizations, including program experience from F-16, F-22, F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, and Skunk Works Advanced Development Programs. He has performed as an R&D principal investigator, aircraft project lead, and function department manager. He is familiar with U.S. aircraft engine industry, government propulsion organizations, and propulsion technology programs and has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, systems engineering, and aircraft propulsion. He was inducted as a Lockheed Martin fellow in 2003. S. Michael Hudson retired as vice chairman of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison Engine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company, Inc. During his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, chief of preliminary design, and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines. Mr. Hudson brings insight to propulsion engineering issues, related business issues, and the European perspective on

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft aviation issues. He is currently a member of ASEB and served as chair of the NRC Committee on Technology Pathways: Assessing the Integrated Plan for a Next Generation Air Transportation System. Clyde Kizer graduated from Eastern Michigan University in 1960 with a B.S. in biochemistry. After graduation, he enlisted in the aviation officer candidate course and became a naval aviator. During the following 15 years of active duty, Mr. Kizer participated in one astronaut recovery, flew three combat tours in Vietnam, graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), served a tour as a USNTPS instructor, and flew as an experimental test pilot for 8 years. He left active duty in 1974 to join United Airlines but remained in the Naval Reserves for 8 more years. During that period, Mr. Kizer held a squadron command and retired from the Naval Reserves in 1982 with the rank of captain. He flew with United for 14 years as an engineering test captain and was promoted to director of engineering and then to vice president of engineering and was responsible for 1,100 personnel and all of the engineering and quality assurance activities for United. He left United in 1988 to join the Air Transport Association (ATA) as vice president, engineering and maintenance. At ATA Mr. Kizer assumed leadership of the Airworthiness Assurance Task Force. After that project was completed, in 1990, he left ATA to become the senior vice president of operations for Midway Airlines. In 1992, he joined Airbus Industries of North America as president of Airbus Service Company (later Airbus North America-Customer Services) and served in that position for over 12 years. In that capacity, he had total customer services responsibilities for all Airbus aircraft operating in North America, and spares and training responsibilities for all Airbus operators in the Western Hemisphere. Mr. Kizer’s tenure with Airbus saw explosive growth for that company in North America. When he joined Airbus in 1992, there were 98 Airbus aircraft of all types in North America. When he retired from Airbus, in April 2004, there were 980 Airbus aircraft operating in North America. Neil E. Paton (NAE) graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in materials science. Currently, he is the chief technology advisor and chairman of the Technology Advisory Board at Liquidmetal Technologies, where he has worked since March 2002. Prior to joining Liquidmetal, he served for 12 years as vice president of technology for Howmet Corporation and as president of Howmet Research Corporation, which developed products, processes, and materials for gas turbines. He also worked in materials development and advanced engineering for 20 years at Rockwell International, where he was involved in numerous programs, including the space shuttle program and the National Aerospace Plane program. He has experience in propulsion engineering, materials science and engineering, rocket propulsion engineering, aircraft propulsion and rocket/missile propulsion. Jonathan Protz is currently an assistant professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke University. Previously, he worked as a defense policy fellow through the Science and Technology Policy Fellows program of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS); as a strategy consultant for an international strategy consulting firm; and as a summer researcher at NASA and USAF civilian research centers. Dr. Protz’s research interests include propulsion and power generation at the micro scale; dynamics and control of microsystems; and financial valuation, modeling, and analysis of engineered systems in aerospace and defense. Dr. Protz holds a Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Rene G. Rendon is on the faculty of the Naval Postgraduate School, where he teaches acquisition and contract management courses in the M.B.A. and M.S. programs. In addition to teaching at the Naval Postgraduate School, Dr. Rendon has conducted research for the Office of the Under Secretary of

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics) and the U.S. Navy and has taught acquisition management courses to foreign military officers and civilian officials. Prior to his appointment at the Naval Postgraduate School, he served for more than 22 years as an acquisition and contracting officer in the Air Force, retiring at the rank of lieutenant colonel. His Air Force career included assignments as a warranted contracting officer for the Peacekeeper intercontinental ballistic missile and the F-22 programs, a contracting squadron commander for an Air Force pilot training base, and the director of contracting for the Air Force’s space surveillance satellite and space launch rocket programs. Dr. Rendon has earned bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in business administration and has taught contract management courses for the UCLA government contracts program. He was also a senior faculty member for the Keller Graduate School of Management, where he taught M.B.A. courses in project management and contract management. He is also a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Squadron Officer School, the Air Command and Staff College, the Air War College, and the Department of Defense Systems Management College. Dr. Rendon is a certified professional contracts manager with the National Contract Management Association (NCMA), a certified purchasing manager with the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), and a certified project management professional with the Project Management Institute. He has received the prestigious Fellow Award from NCMA and was recognized with the Air Force Outstanding Officer in Contracting Award. Dr. Rendon is a member of the ISM Certification Committee and is on the editorial review board for the ISM Inside Supply Management magazine. He is a member of the NCMA board of advisors, as well as associate editor for its Journal of Contract Management. Dr. Rendon is coauthor of Contract Management Organizational Assessment Tools and has also published articles in Contract Management magazine, the Journal of Contract Management, Program Manager magazine, the Project Management Journal, and PM Network magazine. Eli Reshotko (NAE) graduated from the California Institute of Technology with a Ph.D. in aeronautics and physics. Dr. Reshotko is currently the Kent H. Smith Professor Emeritus of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University. He was elected to the NAE in 1984 and is a fellow of the following societies: AIAA, ASME, the American Physical Society, and the American Academy of Mechanics, which he served as president. He is coauthor of over 100 publications and is affiliated with many task forces, committees, and governing boards, several of which he served as chair. His area of expertise is viscous effects in external and internal aerodynamics; two- and three-dimensional compressible boundary layers and heat transfer; stability and transition of viscous flows, both incompressible and compressible; and low-drag technology for aircraft and underwater vehicles. He has expertise in propulsion engineering, thermodynamics, aerodynamics, and aircraft propulsion. Raymond Valeika retired from Delta as senior vice president-technical operations (TechOps). He directed a worldwide maintenance and engineering staff of more than 10,000 professionals, maintaining a fleet of nearly 600 aircraft. Currently, he is an independent consultant advising major companies on aviation matters and an internationally recognized senior airline operations executive with over 40 years of managing the maintenance operations of large airlines. Through his leadership and focus on continuous improvement of the human processes in aviation maintenance, Delta TechOps consistently rated at the top of the industry for performance benchmarks in the areas of safety, quality, productivity, and reliability. Mr. Valeika was honored with ATA’s Nuts & Bolts award, recognizing his leadership in the aviation industry. Finally, his leadership of the human side has been recognized over the years with a Humanitarian Award from the Community Mayors of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, and Laurel from Aviation Week and Space Technology for his role with human factors training at Continental.

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft In October 1999, Mr. Valeika received the Marvin Whitlock Award from the Society of Automotive Engineers. Most recently, the Aviation Week Group honored him with a lifetime achievement award. He is currently a member of NRC’s ASEB. Previously, he held senior executive positions with Pan Am and Continental Airlines as well as Delta. He graduated from St. Louis University with a degree in aeronautical engineering in 1964. Alan van Weele is currently senior platform technical advisor with responsibility for employing Northrop Grumman’s extensive experience on the Boeing 707 developed during the Joint STARS program into other similar military platforms based on the B-707 aircraft. He began his career in the Air Force, where he was assigned to the 1607th Air Transport Wing and became an airframe and engine technician. During his tenure at Dover Air Force Base he enrolled in the pre-engineering course offered by the University of Delaware. Upon discharge from the Air Force in 1960, he completed his engineering degree at Hofstra University, where he acquired a B.S. in engineering science. Mr. van Weele joined the Grumman Corporation in June 1965, where he was employed as a structural test engineer. This assignment involved him in all aspects of material, systems, structural, and fatigue testing of the Grumman products manufactured during that era. After that, he held a number of engineering and program management positions with increasing responsibility. In March 1978, Mr. van Weele was assigned to the hydrofoil program of the Israeli navy as the test and certification manager. Upon transition to Israel of the program in July 1982, Mr. van Weele assumed the additional responsibility of in-country program manager. In January 1985 he was appointed section head of the engineering test department, a position which he held until May 1986, when he was named director of vehicle engineering for the JSTARS program. During that assignment, he was responsible for all vehicle engineering aspects that transitioned the commercial Boeing 707 airliner into a military surveillance platform. In 1991, he assumed the additional responsibilities of follow-on full-scale development engineering manager responsible for producing the engineering design for the third test aircraft. This design package formed the bridge to the current production JSTARS aircraft. During formation of the JSTARS production program in early 1992, Mr. van Weele was assigned the task of activating the JSTARS production facility in Lake Charles, Louisiana, where he was named site manager and director of operations. In 1997, Mr. van Weele was reassigned to work with British Aerospace in the United Kingdom on a cooperative program that leveraged JSTARS technology into a business jet class of aircraft. Francis Veldman is currently senior program manager, refueling systems modernization and sustainment, at Boeing. His responsibilities include leading an organization of 177 people composed of program managers, engineers, and functional support for KC-135, KDC-10, E-6, and MC-130 aircraft, with responsibility for modification and fleet support while developing organizational strategic goals and vision during site transition and realignment. Mr. Veldman is an Air Force command pilot with over 2,500 flying hours in C/KC-135, C-18, and Boeing-707 aircrafts. He graduated from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a B.S. in electrical engineering and from Western New England College with an M.S. in engineering management. Obaid Younossi is a senior management systems analyst currently involved in analyzing cost and acquisition issues for the Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy, and the Department of the Air Force. Before joining RAND in 1998, Dr. Younossi was a member of the Navy’s acquisition community, where he worked on the Joint Strike Fighter program, the F/A-18 E/F, and the AIM-9X missile. Since joining RAND, his research has focused on weapon system acquisition, cost analysis, and defense

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Improving the Efficiency of Engines for Large Nonfighter Aircraft industrial base issues. He has led studies that investigated the reasons for cost growth in F/A-22 aircraft and the issues surrounding the restart of the C-2 aircraft and shutdown of the E-2C production lines, and he assessed various deterministic and probabilistic methods of cost risk estimations. He has advised the Investment Panel of the Defense Science Board. Dr. Younossi holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, an M.A. from George Mason University, and an M.P.P. (Master of Philosophy in Public Policy) and a Ph.D. in public policy from the George Washington University.