TABLE 5-1 Aircraft/Engine Combinations

Aircraft Designation

Current Enginea

Re-engine Candidate

Re-engining

Engine Modification/Upgrade

KC-135R

F108 (CFM 56-2)

 

No

Yes

B-52

TF33 (JT3D)

F117 (4), CFM56 (4), CFM34 (8)

Yes

No

C-5

TF39

CF6-80

Ongoing

No

C-130H

T56 (T56)

AE 2100, PW150

Yes

Yes

KC-135D/E

TF33 (JT3D)

CFM56-2, JT8D-219

Yes

No

KC-10

CF6-50 (CF6-50)

 

No

Yesb

B-1

F101

F101 SLEP, F119, Derivative F119

Yesb

Yesb

E-3

TF33 (JT3D)

CFM56-2 and -7, JT8D-219

Yes

No

E-8

TF33 (JT3D)

JT8D-219, CFM56-2 and -7

Ongoing

No

aMilitary designations shown. Designations in parentheses are commercial engine equivalents where they exist.

bEntries corrected after release of the January 31, 2007, prepublication version of the report. An entry for the C-17 was also deleted at that time.

Nonrecurring Costs

Nonrecurring costs include any costs of the research and development (R&D), testing and evaluation efforts associated with airframe modification, engine modification, nacelle redesign, pylon redesign, other subsystems redesign, flight testing, weapons separation design efforts related to new tooling requirements, and all systems engineering and program management by contractors and the government.

Recurring Costs

The recurring costs would include the unit cost of new engines, of installation kits (engine and airframe modifications), of logistical support, of training, tooling, and test equipment, of spares, data, etc.

Costs and Benefits to Operations and Support

The benefits to operations and support (O&S) would include the impact of fuel savings attributed to more fuel-efficient engines. They also include the impact of improvements in engine reliability and maintainability on cost of mission maintenance personnel, consumables, depot-level reparables (DLRs), and engine overhaul. These elements are defined by the Cost Analysis Improvement Group (CAIG) in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) as follows:

  • Maintenance personnel cost reflects the pay and allowances of military and civilian personnel who support and perform maintenance on the engine. Depending on the maintenance concept and the organizational structure, this element will include maintenance personnel at the organizational level and, possibly, the intermediate level.

  • Consumables are materials and bits-and-pieces repair parts that are used up or consumed during maintenance.

  • DLRs are the unit-level cost of reimbursing the stock fund for purchases of the DLR spares (also referred to as exchangeables) used to replace initial stocks. DLRs may include repairable



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